contact the north carolina state bar - North Carolina Bar Association

39MB Size 1 Downloads 659 Views

May 13, 2016 ... Patrick Brown, Relationship Manager, Lawyers Mutual Liability ...... 327 New Bridge Street, P.O. Box 353, Jacksonville, NC 28541-0353;.
NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION (NCBA) and NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE OF BAR PRESIDENTS (NCCBP) 37th Annual Bar Leadership Institute May 13, 2016 7:45 – 8:30 a.m.

(Optional) Legislative Update—Special Session on Legislative Issues of Interest Michelle Frazier, Legislative Advisory Committee, NCBA

8:00 – 8:30 a.m.

Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:30 – 8:45 a.m.

Welcoming Remarks and Introduction to the Institute Will Oden, Chair, Local Bar Services Committee, NCBA Bill Christy, Chair, NCCBP Patrick Brown, Relationship Manager, Lawyers Mutual Liability Insurance Company of North Carolina

8:45 – 9:50 a.m.

Go-To Resources for Bar Leaders Josh McIntyre, Director of Membership, NCBA David Daggett, past Board Member, NCBA

9:50 – 10:50 a.m.

Leadership Training Session: Motivators Matter—Understanding the Passions that Drive Us Joy Ruhmann, President, Level Up Leadership

10:50 – 11:00 a.m.

Break

11:00 – 12:00 p.m.

News and Views You Can Use Leadership Tech Tips from the Center for Practice Management Joyce Brafford, Center for Practice Management, NCBA Transitioning Lawyers Commission Nan Hannah, Commission Member Administration of Justice Committee – Update on Chief Justice’s Commission on the Administration of Law and Justice Emma Hodson, Committee Member

12:00 – 12:15 p.m.

{00151117.DOC}

Presidential Views Margaret Hunt, President, NC State Bar Shelby Benton, President, NCBA

Updated as of 5/10/16

12:15 – 1:25 p.m.

LUNCH and CONCURRENT SESSION I—PICK ONE SESSION 1. Issues for Metropolitan / Urban / Specialty Bars Dean Carroll Weathers Library Doug Brocker, NCBA 2. Issues for Mid-Sized Bars H. Grady Barnhill Jr. Conference Room (B) Bill Christy, NCCBP Don Higley, NCBA 3. Issues for Small, Multi-County Bars Kilpatrick Stockton Conference Room (A) Peter Bolac, NCCBP Noah Oswald, NCBA 4. Issues for Small, Single County Bars Godwin Executive Conference Room (Upstairs) Kathryn (Katie) Setzer, NCCBP Shelby Benton, NCBA

1:25 – 2:00 p.m.

Speed Resources Session—Find your topic of interest and switch at the bell Hunter Galleria

2:00 – 2:05 p.m.

Transition Back into the Auditorium

2:05 – 2:45 p.m.

Bar Leadership with an Inclusive Perspective Mark Merritt, President-Elect, NC State Bar

2:45 – 3:15 p.m.

Keynote – Leadership Lessons Learned Colonel (Retired) Kirk G. Warner, Smith Anderson

3:15 – 3:20 p.m.

Concluding Remarks – Bill Christy and Will Oden

3:20 – 4:00 p.m.

CONCURRENT SESSION II — PICK ONE SESSION TOPIC 1. Everything You Need to Know about Running a Judicial District Bar James Dorsett Jr. Auditorium Peter Bolac, District Bar Liaison, NC State Bar Nichole McLaughlin, District Bar Liaison, NC State Bar 2. How to Develop a Successful Local Bar Mentorship Program Kilpatrick Stockton Conference Room (A) Doug Brocker, The Brocker Law Firm, P.A. Joyce Brafford, Asst. Director of Center for Practice Management, NCBA

Please complete the short evaluation at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NCBABLI2016

{00151117.DOC}

Updated as of 5/10/16

North Carolina Bar Association and North Carolina State Bar

2016

Bar Leadership Institute Resource Manual CONTENTS 1.

North Carolina Bar Association a. b. c. d.

2.

North Carolina Conference of Bar Presidents a. b.

3.

NCBA Membership Application NCBA Section Application Fastcase Quick Reference Guide Centennial Award for Local Bars Citizen Lawyer Award NCBA Foundation Endowment: Grant Information, Funding and Application

Essential Go-To Resources for Bar Leaders – David Daggett and Josh McIntyre a. b. c. d. e. f.

{TOC.doc}

Executive Committee NC State Bar Officers and Councilors

Additional NCBA Services, Awards and Resources a. b. c. d. e. f.

4.

Officers and Board of Governors Division and Section Chairs and Vice Chairs Committee & Task Force Descriptions Local Bar Services Committee

Resources for Bar Leaders - PowerPoint NC State Bar Web Staff and Department Directory NC State Bar Frequently Asked Questions Statutes Governing District Bar Activities Rules and Regulations Governing District Bars Essential Duties of District Bar Officers

g. h. i. j. k. l. m. n. o. p. q. r. s. t. u.

Lawyer Assistance Program ACAP – Complaints Against Lawyers Fee Dispute Resolution Program ABA Resources and Services NCBA Mentoring Programs NCBA Lawyer Referral Service Application Centennial Award Nomination Form/Example/Recipients Law Related Education Information and Programs Lunch with a Lawyer Articles and Examples BarCARES FAQ Sheet, Services Summary, Forms NC Specialty Bars Lake Family Public Service Award NCBAF Grant Information/Forms NCBA Composite List of all Awards Inns of Court Articles and Materials

5.

Level Up Leadership – Joy Ruhmann

6.

Leadership Tech Tips – Joyce Brafford a.

Tips for Bar Leaders

7.

Bar Leadership With an Inclusive Perspective: Leading Four Generations – Mark Merritt

8.

Everything You Need to Know about Running a Judicial District Bar – Peter Bolac No materials for this section

8.

How to Develop a Successful Local Bar Mentorship Program – Doug Brocker a.

{TOC.doc}

NCBA Mentorship Program

Chapter 1

North Carolina Bar Association

North Carolina Bar Association 2015-16 Officers & Board of Governors E= Executive Committee Member

Title

Officers

Call

Phone, Fax & E-mail

E

President

Shelby D. Benton PO Box 947 Goldsboro, NC 27533-0947

Shelby

Phone: 919-736-3076 Fax: 919-736-1830 [email protected]

E

President-Elect

Kearns Davis PO Box 26000 Greensboro, NC 27420-6000

Kearns

Phone: 336-271-3174 Fax: 336-378-1001 [email protected]

E

Immediate Past President

Catharine B. Arrowood PO Box 389 Raleigh, NC 27602

Catharine

Phone: 919-890-4142 Fax: 919-834-4564 [email protected]

Vice President

Justice Cheri L. Beasley NC Supreme Court PO Box 1841 Raleigh, NC 27602

Cheri

Phone: 919-831-5716 Fax: N/A [email protected]

Vice President

Judge W. Douglas Parsons NC Superior Court PO Box 2617 Clinton, NC 28329

Doug

Phone: 910-596-6616 Fax: 910-596-6617 [email protected]

Vice President

Judge William G. Hamby, Jr. NC District Court PO Box 1732 Concord, NC 28026

Billy

Phone: 704-262-5512 Fax: 704-262-5513 [email protected]

Vice President

Dean Luke Bierman Elon University School of Law 201 N. Greene Street Greensboro, NC 27401

Luke

Phone: 336-279-9201 Fax: 3336-279-8199 [email protected]

E

Vice President

Mahlon W. DeLoatch PO Box 308 Tarboro, NC 27886

Mahlon

Phone: 252-823-8108 Fax: 252-823-7390 [email protected]

E

Vice President

James W. Narron PO Box 1567 Smithfield, NC 27577-1567

Jim

Phone: 919-934-6021 Fax: 919-934-6280 [email protected]

{00145953.DOC}

E

YLD Chair

Harrison A. Lord 5821 Fairview Road, Suite 100 Charlotte, NC 28209

Harrison

Phone: 704-335-0444 Fax: 704-335-0551 [email protected]

E

SLD Chair

J. Phil Carlton PO Box 67 Pinetops, NC 27864

Phil

Phone: 252-827-5141 Fax: 252-827-5487 [email protected]

Board of Governors

E

Term Expiring 2016

Renny W. Deese PO Box 1358 Fayetteville, NC 28302

Renny

Phone: 910-672-4600 Fax: 910-323-0066 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2016

John W. Lassiter 200 S. College Street, Suite 1500 Charlotte, NC 28202

John

Phone: 704-343-4822 Fax: 704-343-0211 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2016

David F. Mills 1559-B Booker Dairy Road Smithfield, NC 27577

David

Phone: 919-934-7235 Fax: 919-989-1529 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2016

Christine L. Myatt PO Box 3463 Greensboro, NC 27402

Christy

Phone: 336-373-1600 Fax: 336-387-8923 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2016

Bonnie J. Refinski-Knight PO Box 1168 New Bern, NC 28563

Bonnie

Phone: 252-638-6666 Fax: 252-638-3542 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2016

Stuart H. Russell 110 Oakwood Drive, Suite 400 Winston-Salem, NC 27103

Stuart

Phone: 336-631-8866 Fax: 336-631-9770 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2016

Felicia A. Washington 104 Airport Drive, CB # 1045 Chapel Hill, NC 27599

Felicia

Phone: 919-962-1554 Fax: 919-962-8677 [email protected]

{00145953.DOC}

Term Expiring 2017

Robert W. Allen 101 N. Tryon Street, Suite 1900 Charlotte, NC 28246

Robert

Phone: 704-377-8350 Fax: 704-373-3950 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2017

Steven B. Epstein 301 Fayetteville Street, Suite 1900 Raleigh, NC 27601

Steve

Phone: 919-783-2846 Fax: 919-783-1075 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2017

C. Mark Holt PO Box 10430 Raleigh, NC 27605

Mark

Phone: 919-745-8600 Fax: 919-745-8135 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2017

Afi S. Johnson-Parris 208 W. Wendover Avenue Greensboro, NC 27401

Afi

Phone: 336-333-2244 Fax: 336-510-2150 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2017

Daniel A. Merlin 308 Solomon Street Charlotte, NC 28216

Danny

Phone: 980-335-0713 Fax: 704-365-3676 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2017

Patti W. Ramseur 300 N. Greene Street, Suite 1400 Greensboro, NC 27401

Patti

Phone: 336-378-5304 Fax: 336-433-7418 [email protected]

E

Term Expiring 2017

Lloyd C. Smith, Jr. PO Box 100 Windsor, NC 27983

Lloyd

Phone: 252-794-3161 Fax: 252-794-2392 [email protected]

E

Term Expiring 2018

Peter S. Brunstetter 2085 Frontis Plaza Boulevard Winston-Salem, NC 27103

Pete

Phone: 336-718-2051 Fax: 336-726-9004 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2018

Heather W. Culp 1701 South Boulevard Charlotte, NC 28203

Heather

Phone: 704-377-4300 Fax: 704-372-1357 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2018

Jason M. Hensley PO Box 740 Lenoir, NC 28645

Jason

Phone: 828-759-6356 Fax: 828-759-4142 [email protected]

E

{00145953.DOC}

Term Expiring 2018

Catherine E. Lee 4700 Homewood Court, Suite 320 Raleigh, NC 27609

Catherine

Phone: 919-341-2636 Fax: 919-647-4485 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2018

Kimberly N. Overton 5308 Arete Way Raleigh, NC 27607

Kimberly

Phone: 919-890-1500 Fax: 919-890-1931 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2018

Jan E. Pritchett 5709 W. Friendly Avenue Greensboro, NC 27420

Jan

Phone: 336-292-4076 Fax: 336-292-8003 [email protected]

Term Expiring 2018

David N. Woods PO Box 2086 High Point, NC 27261

David

Phone: 336-819-6053 Fax: 336-819-6113 [email protected]

Revised 4/19/16

{00145953.DOC}

SECTIONS/DIVISIONS   2015 – 2016  ADMINISTRATIVE LAW {Jeremy}

ANTITRUST & COMPLEX BUSINESS DISPUTES LAW {Andi}

APPELLATE PRACTICE {Kim Crouch}

BANKRUPTCY {Julie}

                                 CHAIR

VICE‐CHAIR | CHAIR‐ELECT

Jennifer A. Morgan Williams Mullen 301 Fayetteville Street, Suite 1700 Raleigh, NC 27601 P: 919‐981‐4051 F: 919‐981‐4300 [email protected]

Bradford A. Williams City of Raleigh City Attorney's Office PO Box 590 Raleigh, NC 27602 P: 919‐996‐6622

E. Bradley Evans Ward & Smith PA PO Box 8088 Greenville, NC  27835‐8088 P: 252‐215‐4025 F: 252‐215‐4077 [email protected]

J. Mitchell Armbruster Smith Anderson Blount Dorsett Mitchell & Jernigan LLP PO Box 2611 Raleigh, NC  27602‐2611 P: 919‐821‐6707 F: 919‐821‐6800 [email protected]

Julia C. Ambrose Brooks Pierce McLendon Humphrey & Leonard LLP PO Box 1800 Raleigh, NC 27602‐1800 P: 919‐839‐0300 F: 919‐839‐0304 [email protected]

Preston O. Odom III James McElroy & Diehl PA 10230 Victoria Blake Drive Cornelius, NC 28031 P: 704‐372‐9870 F: 704‐333‐5508 [email protected]

John C. Bircher III White & Allen PA PO Drawer U New Bern, NC  28563 P: 252‐638‐5792 F: 252‐637‐7548 [email protected]

Ashley S. Rusher Blanco Tackabery & Matamoros PA PO Box 25008 Winston‐Salem, NC  27114‐5008 P: 336‐293‐9000 F: 336‐293‐9030 [email protected]

[email protected]

BUSINESS LAW {Jeremy}

CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS  & RESPONSIBILITIES {Andi}

CONSTRUCTION LAW

{Julie}

CORPORATE COUNSEL {Julie}

Anna S. Mills The Van Winkle Law Firm 2820 Selwyn Ave Ste 861 Charlotte, NC  28209 P: 704‐650‐0576 F: 704‐831‐5336 [email protected] 

[email protected]

Curtis H. [Trey] Allen III UNC School of Government Campus Box 3330 Chapel Hill, NC  27599‐3330 P: 919‐843‐9019 F: 919‐962‐0654 [email protected]

Robert M. [Bob] Ward Solo Practitioner PO Box 1231 Burlington, NC  27216‐1231 P: 336‐228‐1433 F: 336‐228‐6610 [email protected]

Stephanie U. Roberts Spilman Thomas & Battle PLLC 110 Oakwood Dr Ste 500 Winston Salem, NC  27103 P: 336‐631‐1062 F: 336‐725‐4476 [email protected]

M. Riana Smith Strauch Green & Mistretta PC 911 Paverstone Dr Ste F Raleigh, NC  27615 P: 919‐817‐1589 F: 336‐725‐8867 [email protected]

Robert C. Hunter The Clearing House Payments Co LLC 115 Business Park Drive Winston‐Salem, NC 27107 P: 336‐769‐5314 [email protected]

Elizabeth C. Southern Hanesbrands, Inc. 1000 E. Hanes Mill Road Winston‐Salem, NC 27105 P: 336‐519‐6661

Stephen F. Later Robbins May & Rich LLP 120 Applecross Road Pinehurst, NC 28374 P: 910‐692‐4900

[email protected]

CRIMINAL JUSTICE {Jacquelyn}

DISPUTE RESOLUTION {Julie} 

EDUCATION LAW {Jeremy}

ELDER & SPECIAL NEEDS LAW {Julie}

Robert C. Kemp III Public Defenders Office Pitt Cty District 3A 602 Queen Anne's Rd Greenville, NC 27858 P: 252‐695‐7300 [email protected]

Benjamin O. [Boz] Zellinger District Attorneys Office District 10 PO Box 31 Raleigh, NC  27602‐0031 P: 919‐792‐5107 [email protected]

Richard [Rick] J. Igou Solo Practitioner 1007 Vickers Ave Durham, NC  27707 P: 919‐682‐3517 F: 919‐682‐2016 [email protected]

Patricia L. [Trish] Holland Jackson Lewis LLP 1400 Crescent Green Ste 215 Cary, NC 27518‐8118 P: 919‐424‐8608 F: 919‐854‐0908 [email protected]

Krista L. Newkirk UNC Charlotte 9201 University City Blvd Chancellor's Office Charlotte, NC 28223‐0001 P: 704‐687‐5674 F: 704‐687‐1700 [email protected]

Benita N. Jones Tharrington Smith LLP PO Box 1151 Raleigh, NC  27602‐1151 P: 919‐821‐4711 F: 919‐829‐1583 [email protected]

Doris (Dori) J. Wiggen Schell Bray PLLC 100 Europa Drive, Suite 271 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 P: 919‐869‐3074 F: 919‐882‐9495 [email protected]

Natalie J. Miller Law Office of Natalie J. Miller, PLLC 548 Williamson Road, Suite 2 Mooresville, NC 28117 P: 704‐662‐3557 F: 704‐662‐3575 [email protected]

ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY &  NATURAL RESOURCES LAW {Andi}

ESTATE PLANNING & FIDUCIARY  LAW {Jeremy}

FAMILY LAW {Jacquelyn}

GOVERNMENT & PUBLIC SECTOR {Andi}

Theodore [Ted] A. Feitshans

Sean Sullivan

NC State University PO Box 5884 Raleigh, NC  27650 P: 919‐515‐5195 F: 919‐515‐6268 [email protected]

Troutman Sanders LLP 434 Fayetteville Street, Suite 1900 Raleigh, NC  27601 P: 919‐835‐4173 F: 919‐829‐8748 [email protected]

Amy H. Kincaid

Edward W. Griggs

Schell Bray PLLC 230 N. Elm Street, Suite 1500 Greensboro, NC 27401 P: 336‐370‐8849 F: 336‐370‐8830 [email protected]

Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice LLP 1 W. 4th Street, Suite 1200 Winston‐Salem, NC 27101 P: 336‐721‐3762

Kevin L. Miller Solo Practioner 1144 W. Fourth Street Winston Salem, NC 27101 P: 336‐793‐1790 F: 337‐793‐1751 [email protected]

Rebecca [Becky] K. Watts Krusch & Sellers PA 6230 Fairview Road, Suite 105 Charlotte, NC 27210 P: 704‐556‐0707 F: 704‐553‐7824 [email protected]

Ward A. Zimmerman

John P. Schifano

NC Dept of Justice 114 W. Edenton St. Raleigh, NC  27602 P: 919‐716‐6000 [email protected]

Town of Holly Springs PO Box 8 Holly Springs, NC  27540‐0008 P: 919‐557‐2917 F: 919‐552‐0654 [email protected]

[email protected]

HEALTH LAW {Andi}

INSURANCE LAW {Julie}

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW {Andi}

INTERNATIONAL LAW & PRACTICE  {Julie}

Joseph [Joe] M. Kahn Nexsen Pruet PLLC 4141 Parklake Ave Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27612 P: 919‐653‐7834 F: 919‐890‐4549 [email protected]

Kimberly A. Licata BCBS of NC Corporate HQ PO Box 2291 Durham, NC  27702‐2291 P: 919‐765‐7458 F: 919‐765‐4474 [email protected]

Josephine H. Hicks Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein 401 S. Tryon Street, Suite 3000 Charlotte, NC 28202 P: 704‐335‐9025

J. David Stradley White & Stradley PLLC 3105 Charles B Root Wynd Raleigh, NC 27612 P: 919‐844‐0400

[email protected]

[email protected]

Laura M. Kelley Myers Bigel Sibley & Sajovec PA PO Box 37428 Raleigh, NC  27627‐74288 P: 919‐854‐1400 F: 919‐854‐1401 [email protected]

Darrell A. Fruth Brooks Pierce McLendon Humphrey & Leonard LLP 1600 Wells Fargo 150 Fayetteville St Raleigh, NC  27601 [email protected]

David A. Shuford

Mica N. Worthy

Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson PA 101 N. Tryon St. Ste 1900 Charlotte, NC  28246 P: 704‐377‐8118 F: 704‐339‐3418 [email protected]

Cranfill Sumner & Hartzog LLP 2907 Providence Rd. Ste 200 Charlotte, NC  28211 P: 704‐940‐3405 [email protected]

JUVENILE JUSTICE & CHILDREN’S RIGHTS {Jeremy}

LABOR & EMPLOYMENT LAW {Julie}

LAW PRACTICE MGMT & TECH {Jeremy}

Peggy D. Nicholson Legal Aid of NC PO Box 2101 Durham, NC 27702 P: 919‐226‐0052

Eric J. Zogry State Juvenile Defender PO Box 2448 Raleigh, NC 27602 P: 919‐890‐1650

[email protected]

[email protected]

Grant B. Osborne Ward and Smith PO Box 2020 Asheville, NC 28802 P: 828‐348‐6070

Jessica E. Leaven Grimes Teich Anderson LLP PO Box 7074 Asheville, NC 28802 P: 828‐251‐0800

[email protected]

[email protected]‐injurylaw.com

Virginia [Ginny]Vaughan Allen Cranfill Sumner & Hartzog LLP 5420 Wade Park Blvd Ste 300 Raleigh, NC 27611 P: 919‐863‐8750

Abigail E. Peoples Solo Practioner 5509B W Friendly Avenue, Suite 206 Greensboro, NC 27410 P: 336‐275‐6003 [email protected]

[email protected]

LITIGATION

{Julie}

L. Cooper Harrell Van Laningham Duncan PLLC 300 N. Greene St. Ste 850 Greensboro, NC  27401 P: 336‐645‐3327 [email protected]

Karen M. Rabenau Twiggs Strickland & Rabenau PA 4309 Emperor Blvd Ste 410 Durham, NC  27703 P: 919‐828‐4357 F: 919‐833‐7924 [email protected]

REAL PROPERTY {Jeremy}

SOLO, SMALL FIRM & GENERAL  PRACTICE {Jeremy}

Scott A. Schaaf Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice LLP 1 W 4th St Ste 1200 Winston Salem, NC  27101 P: 336‐721‐3531 F: 336‐726‐6999 [email protected]

Tonya B. Powell Shanahan Law Group 128 E. Hargett Street, Suite 300 Raleigh, NC 27601 P: 919‐856‐9494

Elysia Prendergast‐Jones

T. Gregory Doucette

119 Greengate Court, Apt. A Cary, NC 27511 P: 919‐285‐1712 [email protected]

Solo Practioner 311 E. Main Street Durham, NC 27701 P: 919‐998‐6993

Nichelle N. Levy NASCAR Inc. 550 S. Caldwell Street, Suite 2000 Charlotte, NC 28202 P: 704‐348‐7304 [email protected]

Shannon L. Vandiver Solo Practioner PO Box 726 Huntersville, NC 28070 P: 704‐618‐1104 [email protected]

Paul G.Topolka Nexsen Pruet PLLC PO Box 3463 Greensboro, NC  27402‐3463 P: 336‐387‐5123 F: 336‐387‐8934 [email protected]

Joshua D. Bryant Smith Anderson Blount Dorsett Mitchell & Jernigan LLP 2520 Beechridge Road Raleigh, NC  27608 P: 919‐821‐6643 F: 919‐821‐6800 [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

SPORTS &  ENTERTAINMENT {Julie}

TAX {Jacquelyn}

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION {Andi}

ZONING, PLANNING & LAND USE {Julie}

PARALEGAL  DIVISION (PD)  {Jeremy}

SENIOR LAWYERS DIVISION

{Andi}

Jeffrey A. Misenheimer Lewis & Roberts PLLC PO Box 17529 Raleigh, NC  27619‐7529 P: 919‐981‐0191 F: 919‐981‐0199 [email protected]‐roberts.com

William B. Wallace Law Offices of Michael A. Demayo LLP PO Box 34426 Charlotte, NC  28234‐4426 P: 704‐333‐1000 F: 704‐333‐6677 [email protected]

John H. Carmichael

LeAnn Nease Brown

Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson, PA 101 N. Tryon Street, Suite 1900 Charlotte, NC 28246 P: 704‐377‐8341 [email protected]

Brown & Bunch PLLC 101 N. Columbia Street Chapel Hill, NC 27514 P: 919‐968‐1111 [email protected]

Nichole D. Hutchins, NCCP, ACP 407 Rockbridge Dr Kernersville, NC  27284 P: 336‐378‐5458 F: 336‐725‐7876 [email protected]

Annette L. Phelps Benton Family Law PO Box 947 Goldsboro, NC  27533‐0947 P: 919‐736‐3076 F: 919‐736‐1830 [email protected]

John (Phil) Phillips Carlton PO Box 67 Pinetops, NC 27864 P: 252‐827‐5141 F: 252‐827‐5487 [email protected]

John Melvin Bowen PO Box 627

Williamston, NC 27892 P: 252‐792‐2222 [email protected]

YOUNG LAWYERS DIVISION {Jacquelyn}

Harrison A. Lord Bernhardt and Strawser, PA 5821 Fairview Road, Suite 100 Charlotte, NC 28209

Matthew A. Cordell PO Box 33009 Raleigh, NC 27636

P:704-335-0444

P: 919‐277‐9196

F: 704‐335‐0551 [email protected]

[email protected]

2016-17 NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION (NCBA) and NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION FOUNDATION, INC. (NCBAF)

COMMITTEE DESCRIPTIONS [Includes Chairs & Staff Liaisons] 04/22/2016

Access To Justice Leadership Council (ATJ-LC) (F) is committed to increasing the level of financial support by lawyers for the annual statewide Legal Aid of North Carolina Access to Justice Campaign. (Chair: Wade Smith) (Staff Liaison: Tom Hull) Administration of Justice Committee - AOJ (F) monitors the civil and criminal justice systems in North Carolina and addresses important issues such as overcrowded court dockets, creation of new courts, public defender's offices and judicial salaries. (Chair: Jim Phillips) (Staff Liaison: Kim Crouch) Appellate Rules Committee (F) Appellate Rules examines the rules of appellate procedure and recommends any revisions to the Board of Governors for ultimate referral and consideration by the N.C. Supreme Court. (Chair: Michelle Connell) (Staff Liaison: Kim Crouch) Audit & Finance Committee (A/F) is made up of members of the Board of Governors to reviews the financial affairs of the North Carolina Bar Association and North Carolina Bar Association Foundation, Inc. It prepares the annual budget and serves as the audit committee. (Chair: Kearns Davis) (Staff Liaison: Ginny Craig) Bench/Bar Liaison Committee (A) promotes cooperation between the bench and the bar to advance the legal profession and its service to the public. (Co-Chair: Judge Jane Gray & D.J. Mason) (Staff Liaison: Kim Crouch) Career Services Task Force (A) is charged with researching the issues around the different stages of the careers of our members and to develop a work product containing recommendations to be considered by the Board of Governors identifying the opportunities where our organization may provide services to our members. (Co-Chair: Walker Douglas & Devon Williams) (Staff Liaison: TBA) Charter & Bylaws Committee (A/F) is made up of members of the Board of Governors. The committee originates and recommends amendments to the Charter & Bylaws of both the North Carolina Bar Association and the North Carolina Bar Association Foundation, Inc. It also assists the Board of Governors in submitting proposed charter and bylaws amendments to the membership. (Chair: David Woods) (Staff Liaison: TBA) Communications Committee (A) recommends requirements to accommodate the communications needs of the NCBA and monitors production of the This is the Law pamphlet series. (Chair: Neubia Harris) (Staff Liaison: Russell Rawlings) Continuing Legal Education Committee (F) provides oversight for Continuing Legal Education programs and activities. (Chair: Roberta King Latham) (Staff Liaison: Catherine Peglow) Convention Planning Advisory Committee (A) assists with planning the NCBA Annual Meeting. (Chair: George Doyle) (Staff Liaison: Tom Hull) Development Committee (F) provides volunteer leadership for fundraising activities. (Chair: Beth Langley) (Staff Liaison: Tom Hull) Endowment Committee (F) reviews funding requests and recommends grants from the NCBA Foundation Endowment. (Chair: Judge Julian Mann) (Staff Liaison: Tom Hull)

{00139464.DOC}

2 4All Service Day Committee (F) plans and implements our signature phone-a-lawyer day that occurs at call centers located across the state. (Co-Chairs: Kat Armstrong & Ashley Bennington) (Staff Liaison: Kim Bart Mullikin) Investment Committee (A/F) oversees the investments of the North Carolina Bar Association and North Carolina Bar Association Foundation, Inc., including the Endowment, and assures that their respective funds are invested in the proper manner. (Chair: Mike Hearn) (Staff Liaison: Ginny Craig) Judicial Independence Committee (A) strives to increase public and legislative awareness of the importance of an independent judiciary and seeks improvements in judicial selection in North Carolina. (Chair: ) (Staff Liaison: Kim Crouch) Judicial Performance Evaluation (JPE) Committee (F) oversees the survey of North Carolina lawyers to evaluate the trial bench candidates (Superior and District Courts) in each election cycle. (Chair: Charles Raynal) (Staff Liaison: TBA) Law-Related Education Committee (F) organizes and promotes a better understanding of, and appreciation for, the rule of law through programs and activities impacting youth. (Co-Chairs: Lucy Austin & Doug McClanahan) (Staff Liaison: Diane Wright) Law School Liaison Committee (A) facilitates communication between legal educators and the practicing bar and serves as a clearinghouse for information regarding N.C. law schools. (Chair: Dean Luke Bierman) (Staff Liaison: Catherine Peglow) Lawyer Effectiveness & Quality of Life Committee (F) engages in activities to help attorneys successfully practice law in an increasingly complex and competitive profession. (Chair: Travis Martin) (Staff Liaison: Amber Nimocks) Lawyer Referral Service Committee (F) monitors the operation of our North Carolina Lawyer Referral Service and recommends improvements to the program. (Chair: David Daggett) (Staff Liaison: Kim Bart Mullikin) Legislative Advisory Committee (A) works with the NCBA’s Office of Governmental Affairs to provide advice and counsel to the Board of Governors regarding public policy and legislative priorities. It will closely look at strategies and initiatives that the NCBA may undertake to effectively advance its legislative agenda, particularly on substantive legislation involving the legal profession and the administration of justice. The Committee will develop and propose recommendations to the Board of Governors regarding various legislative strategies. (Chair: Alan Duncan) (Staff Liaison: Kim Crouch) Local Bar Outreach Committee (A) acts as the advisory committee to offer recommendations about how the Association may serve the needs of local bar organizations. This committee conducts the annual Bar Leadership Institute, a full day of leadership skills training for leaders of local, judicial district and specialty bar organizations across the state. The committee is also responsible for selecting and honoring attorneys with the Citizen Lawyer Award to recognize and promote the non-legal, public service work of these individuals in communities across the state. (Chair: Mary Dillon & Will Oden) (Staff Liaison: TBA) Membership Committee (A) promotes strategies to encourage new and continued membership in the organization. (Chair: Dan Atcheson) (Staff Liaison: Josh McIntyre) Memorials Committee (A) is made up of members of the Board of Governors. It is responsible for reporting the names of deceased NCBA members and honoring them by a memorial tribute at the Annual Meeting. (Chair: Catherine Lee & Jan Pritchett) (Staff Liaison: Allan Head) Minorities in the Profession Committee (A) is dedicated to the outreach and promotion of an increased presence of minorities in the legal profession. (Chair: Sharita Whitaker) (Staff Liaison: Diane Wright)

{00139464.DOC}

3 NC LEAP (F) provides direction and oversight of this pro bono entrepreneurship assistance program where low wealth entrepreneurs obtain assistance on business matters from volunteer lawyers. (Chair: Laura Davenport) (Staff Liaison: Charlotte Stewart and Kim Bart Mullikin) Nominations Committee (A) selects and nominates qualified NCBA members for the offices of vice-presidents and board members, which are voted on by the membership at the NCBA Annual Meeting. (Chair: Mark Holt) (Staff Liaison: Allan Head) Past Presidents’ Council (A/F) serves as a leadership resource to the various working groups of the NCBA and the NCBA Foundation. Its membership consists of seven past presidents of the NCBA charged with the responsibility of following up on major reports and recommendations, reviewing existing programs and advising current leadership on new challenges and opportunities. The Council also screens nominees for the office of President-Elect and selected NCBA/NCBAF awards. (Chair: Shelby Benton) (Staff Liaison: Allan Head) Personnel Committee (A/F) consults with the Executive Director and Audit and Finance Committee to advise NCBA officers and the Board of Governors regarding personnel matters. (Chair: Janet Ward Black) (Staff Liaison: Allan Head) Planned Giving Committee (F) advises on efforts to educate lawyers about planned giving opportunities to further sustain activities of our Endowment. (Chair: Robin Barefoot) (Staff Liaison: Tom Hull) Pro Bono Activities Committee (F) advises on activities relating to pro bono delivery of legal services and annually selects recipients of our Pro Bono Awards. (Chair: Alex Elkan & Beth Froehling) (Staff Liaison: Kim Bart Mullikin) Professionalism Committee (F) develops and oversees professionalism initiatives and recommends a recipient for the annual H. Brent McKnight Renaissance Lawyer Award. (Chair: Lisa Sheppard) (Staff Liaison: Russell Rawlings) Resolutions Committee (A/F) is made up of members of the Board of Governors. It prepares and screens all resolutions to be voted on by the membership at the NCBA Annual Meeting. It also serves as a working committee at Board meetings to draft necessary resolutions for considerations by the Board. (Chair: Kimberly Overton) (Staff Liaison: TBA) Strategic Planning & Emerging Trends Committee (A/F) creates and oversees the implementation of the strategic plan of the organization and alerts the Board of Governors of emerging trends impacting the legal profession. (Chair: Debra Foster) (Staff Liaison: TBA) Technology Committee (A) helps lawyers to realize the benefits of technology through the identification and recommendation of products, services and providers of particular interest to legal professionals. (Chair: Neil Riemann) (Staff Liaison: Erik Mazzone) Transitioning Lawyers Commission (TLC) (A) [formerly Retiring With Dignity Task Force] addresses issues involved with winding down a law practice and retiring gracefully. (Co-Chairs: Woody Connette & Mark Scruggs) (Staff Liaison: Joyce Brafford) Women in the Profession Committee (A) identifies ways to encourage and maintain the active participation and advancement of women in the legal profession. (Chair: Melissa Walker) (Staff Liaison: Joyce Brafford)

{00139464.DOC}

The North Carolina Bar Association Local Bar Outreach Committee Roster Name Oden III, William Augustus Anderson, Matthew Allen Lawson Brocker, Douglas J. Christy, William Henry Cross, Meredith Laughridge Denning, Michelle Drake Dula, Arnita Maria Grantham, Norris Musselwhite Higley II, Donald Strong Hildebran-Bachofen, Deborah L. Hucks, Erin Suzanne Hunt, Grady Lee Oswald, Michael Noah Pavur, Catherine Rogers, Ciara Louise Sayed, Linda B. Scudder, Sharon Griffin Stark, Bradley Alexander Stokes, Stephen Craig

Firm Ward and Smith PA Roberson Haworth & Reese PLLC The Brocker Law Firm PA Stone & Christy PA Gailor Hunt Jenkins Davis & Taylor NC Industrial Commission City of Hickory Musselwhite Musselwhite Branch & Grantham Lanier Law Group PA Manning Fulton & Skinner PA Hucks & Regan LLP Locklear Jacobs Hunt & Brooks Solo Practitioner The Law Offices of Oliver & Cheek PLLC Block Crouch Keeter Behm & Sayed LLP Scudder Law PLLC Fisher Stark Cash PA NC District Court

Address PO Box 7068 Wilmington, NC 28406-7068 PO Box 1550 High Point, NC 27261-1550 5540 Centerview Dr Ste 200 Raleigh, NC 27606-3386 110 N Dougherty St Black Mountain, NC 28711-3326 1101 Haynes St Ste 201 Raleigh, NC 27604-0000 1052 N Lake Dr Smithfield, NC 27577-0000 PO Box 398 Hickory, NC 28603-0398 PO Box 1448 Lumberton, NC 28359-1448 108 Firetower Rd Ste G ,Winterville, NC 28590-0000 PO Box 20389 Raleigh, NC 27619-0389 PO Box 2033 Monroe, NC 28111-0000 PO Box 999 Pembroke, NC 28372-0999 307 Meadowland Dr Ste 101 Hillsborough, NC 27278 4819 Emperor Blvd Ste 400 Durham, NC 27703-0000 PO Box 1548 New Bern, NC 28563-1548 PO Box 4 Wilmington, NC 28402-0004 PO BOX 1682 Morehead City, NC 28557 35 N Market St Asheville, NC 28801-0000 150 Northstone Place Fayetteville, NC 28303

Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]eklaw.com [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Phone (910)794-4813 (336)889-8733 (919)424-6334 (828)669-7642 (919)832-8488 (919)807-2668 (828)323-7564 (910)738-5277 (252)757-7777 (919)787-8880 (704)289-3229 (910)521-3413 (919)904-4624 (919)675-3633 (252)633-1930 (910)763-2727 (252)648-0115 (828)505-4300 (910)475-3012

Chapter 2

North Carolina Conference of Bar Presidents

4/15/2016

OFFICERS & COUNCILORS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE BAR 2015-2016

Margaret M. Hunt, President, 52 W. Main Street, Suite B; PO Box 1175, Brevard, NC 28712; 828/884-2780; FAX: 828/884-7975; Email: [email protected] (Jeff) (6737) Mark W. Merritt, President-Elect, 101 N. Tryon Street, Suite 1900, Charlotte, NC 28246; 704/3772536; FAX: 704/378-4000; Email: [email protected] (Lindsay) (12198) John M. Silverstein, Vice President, Satisky & Silverstein, 415 Hillsborough Street, Suite 201, Raleigh, NC 27603; 919.790.9102; FAX 919.790.1560; email: [email protected] (Leslie) (3993)

L. Thomas Lunsford, II, Secretary-Treasurer, 217 E. Edenton Street (27601), PO Box 25908 Raleigh, NC 27611; 919/828-4620; FAX 919/821-9168; Email: [email protected] (Julie) (8379) Ronald L. Gibson, Past President, Ruff Bond Cobb Wade & Bethune, 831 East Morehead Street, Suite 860, Charlotte, NC 28202; 704/377-1634, Email: [email protected] (Felicia) (8283)

COUNCILORS DIVISION I DISTRICT C. Everett Thompson, II, 101 W. Main Street, Elizabeth City, NC 27909; 252/335-7200; FAX: 1. 252/338-5297; Email: [email protected] (Dru) (5859) G. Thomas Davis, Jr., P. O. Box 277, Swan Quarter, NC 27885, 252/926-3781; FAX: 252/9262. 3486; Email: [email protected] (Kathy) (8723) 3A. Charles R. Hardee, 202 E. Arlington Blvd. Ste. W, P.O. Box 924, Greenville, NC 27835; 252/3551998; FAX: 252/321-2948; Email: [email protected] (Tena) (9836) 3B. Debra L. Massie, 710 Cedar Street, P.O. Box 360, Beaufort, NC 28516; 252/728-3158; FAX: 252/728-5282; Email: [email protected] (Lee Pittman) (17545) Robert W. Detwiler, 327 New Bridge Street, P.O. Box 353, Jacksonville, NC 28541-0353; 4. 910/455-0867; FAX: 910/346-5418; Email: [email protected] (8245) Harold L. Pollock, 105 East Fremont Street, P.O. Drawer 999, Burgaw, NC 28425; 910/259/6030; 5. FAX: 910/259-6035; Email: [email protected] (Sadie) (8465) W. Rob Lewis, II, 114 Deerwoods Road, Ahoskie, NC 27910; 252/395-2093; Email: 6. [email protected] (Faye) (9918) Randall Pridgen, P.O. Box 7100, 2343 Professional Drive, Rocky Mount, NC 27804; 252/9377. 2200; FAX: 252/937-8100; Email: [email protected] (Liz) (11060) C. Branson (Branny) Vickory, III, P.O. Box 10809, Goldsboro, NC 27532-0809; 919.778.6707; 8. Email: [email protected] (Deborah) (10083)

4/15/2016

DIVISION II 9. 9A. 10. 10. 10. 10. 10. 10. 10. 10. 11A. 11B. 12. 13. 14. 14. 15A. 15B. 16A. 16B. 16C.

Paul Jerald Stainback, P.O. Box 1820, Henderson, NC 27536; 252/438-4136; FAX 252/4928183; Email: [email protected] (Ellen) (7339) Alan S. Hicks, 3 Union Plaza, 205 N. Main Street, Roxboro, NC 27573; 336/599-4032; FAX: 336/599-3656; Email: [email protected] (Cindy) (5658) Theodore C. Edwards, II, 2119 Abby Knoll Drive, Apex, NC 27502; 919/474-9137; Email: [email protected] (Tiffany) (20948) Nicholas J. Dombalis, II, P.O. Box 18237, Raleigh, NC 27619; 919/781-1311; FAX: 919/7820465; Email: [email protected] (Melissa) (6596) Heidi C. Bloom, P.O. Box 17803, Raleigh, NC 27619; 919/781-4000; Email: [email protected] (Woofer Davidan) (22848) C. Colon Willoughby, Jr., 2700 Peachtree Street, Raleigh, NC 27608; 919 755-6617; Email: [email protected] (Tricia) (9040) Warren Savage, Lawyers Mutual, P.O. Box 1929, Cary, NC 27512; 919.677.8900; FAX: 919.677.0131; Email: [email protected] (Elizabeth) (23534) Walter E. Brock, Jr., Young Moore Henderson, P.O. Box 31627, Raleigh, NC 27622; 919.861.5119; Email: [email protected]oorelaw.com (Lynne) (8195) Katherine Ann Frye, Frye Law Office, 162 Mine Lake Court, Suite 200, Raleigh, NC 27615; 919. 846.8807; FAX: 919.457.1496; Email: [email protected] (Kevin Smith) (27835) Donna R. Rascoe, GlenLake One, Suite 200, 4140 Parklake Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27612; 919/329-3835; Email: [email protected] (Glen) (20078) Eddie S. Winstead, III, Harrington, Gilleland, Winstead, et al; 1410 Elm Street, Sanford, NC 27330; 919.776.4131; Email: [email protected] (Libby) (10587) Marcia Armstrong, 602 South Third St., P.O. Box 27, Smithfield, NC 27577; 919/934-1575; FAX: 919/934-1846; Email: [email protected]; (Lamar) (10784) Lonnie M. Player, Jr., P.O. Box 88095, Fayetteville, NC 28304; 910/426-5291; FAX: 910/4269500; Email:[email protected] (Dana) (25462) Harold (Butch) Pope, 706 N. Madison Street, P.O. Box 749, Whiteville, NC 28472; 910/6400876; FAX: 910 640-2173; Email: [email protected] (Beverly) (10704) John A. Bowman, 2741 University Drive, Durham, NC 27707; P.O. Box 52396, Durham, NC 27717; 919/493-6464; FAX: 919/493-1218; Email: [email protected] (Ginny) (13865) William S. Mills, 404 Hunt Street, Suite 100, Durham, NC 27701; P.O. Drawer 3865, Durham, NC 27702; 919/683-2135; Email: [email protected] (8905) Charles Davis, P.O. Box 366, Mebane, NC 27302; 919/563-2550; FAX: 919/563-9019; Email: [email protected] (7082) Dorothy (Dottie) Bernholz, 1202 Roosevelt Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27514; 919/942-1845; Email: [email protected] (Steve) (6505) Terry R. Garner, Moser, Garner & Bruner, PA, P.O. Box 563, Laurinburg, NC 28353; 910.2762631; Email: [email protected] (Marilyn) (1599) David F. Branch, Jr., 606 N. Elm Street, P.O. Box 1448, Lumberton, NC 28359; 910/738-5277, FAX: 910/738-3678, Email: [email protected] (JoAnne) (9710) Richard Buckner, 109 W. Franklin Street, #1, Rockingham, NC 28379; 910/997-5076; Email: [email protected] (Pat) (7637)

4/15/2016

DIVISION III 17A. 17B. 18. 18. 18H 19A. 19B. 19C. 19D. 20A. 20B. 21. 21. 22A. 22B. 23.

Matthew W. Smith, 610 Henry Street, Eden, NC 27288; P.O. Box 507, Eden, NC 27289; 336/623-4491; FAX: 336/623-7308; Email: [email protected] (Michelle) (25652) Thomas W. Anderson, P.O. Box 1273, Pilot Mountain, NC 27041; 336/368-9621; FAX: 336/368-9168; Email: [email protected] (Ann) (8628) Barbara R. Christy, 1500 Renaissance Plaza, 230 N. Elm Street, P.O. Box 21847, Greensboro, NC 27420; 336/370-8800; FAX: 336/370-8830; Email: [email protected] (Rick) (10833) Stephen Edward Robertson, Higgins Benjamin, PLLC, P.O. Box 20570, Greensboro, NC 27420, 336.273.1600; FAX: 336.274.4650; Email: [email protected] ( ) (27608) Richard S. Towers, 322 South Wrenn Street, High Point, NC 27260; 336/885-5151; FAX: 336/885-5152; Email: None (Doris) (5446) James D. Foster, P.O. Box 1362, Concord, NC 28026; 3900 Davidson Hwy., Concord, NC 28027; 704/782-1996; FAX: 704/782-1996 Email: [email protected] (Willie) (12154) Clark R. Bell, P.O. Box 4064, Asheboro, NC 27204; 336.629.5883; FAX: 336.629.6337; Email: [email protected]; (Diane) (10799) Darrin D. Jordan, 305 N. Main Street, Salisbury, NC 28144; 704/637-1111; FAX: 704/642-0672; Email: [email protected] (Dana) (17483) Richard J. Costanza, 375 Southeast Broad Street, Southern Pines, NC 28387; 910/692-7121; FAX: 910/692-4206; Email: [email protected] (Dana) (20915) John Webster, Singletary & Webster, P.O. Box 1518, Albemarle, NC 28002; 704.985.1300; Email: [email protected] ( ) (22840) H. Ligon Bundy, 316 Hayne Street (28112), P.O. Box 7, Monroe, NC 28111; 704.289.2519; FAX: 704.261.0083; EMAIL: [email protected] (Linda) (7034) Michael L. Robinson, 101 N. Cherry Street, Suite 720, Winston-Salem, NC 27101; 336/6318500; FAX 336/631-6999; Email: [email protected] (Wynn Tanner) (9438) Kevin G. Williams, P.O. Box 21029, Winston-Salem, NC 27120-1029; 336.714.4150; FAX: 336.722.8153; Email: [email protected] (Aimee) (25760) Kimberly S. Taylor, P.O. Box 1237, Taylorsville, NC 28681; 828/635-0312; Email: [email protected] (Tim Byrd) (9834) Roger S. Tripp, 118 W. First Avenue, Lexington, NC 27292; P.O. Box 743, Lexington, NC 27293; 336/249-9961; FAX: 336/249-3309; Email: [email protected] (Diane) (6413) John S. Willardson; 206 E. Main Street, Wilkesboro, NC 28597; 336/838-5129; FAX: 336/8388959; Email: [email protected] (Ann) (4730)

4/15/2016

DIVISION IV 24. 25. 26.

26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 27A. 27B. 28. 29A. 29B. 30.

Andrea N. Capua, 642 W. King Street, P.O. Box 193, Boone, NC 28607; 828.264.6126; FAX: 828.264.7743; Email: [email protected] (Steve Owen) (20278) M. Alan LeCroy, LeCroy & Wilcox, P.O. Drawer 1785, Morganton, NC 28680; 828.438.9327; FAX: 828.438.9328; Email: [email protected] ( ) (18272 ) DeWitt “Mac” McCarley, Parker Poe, 3 Wells Fargo Center, 401 S. Tryon Street, Suite 3000, Charlotte, NC 28202; 704/335-9519; FAX 704/335-9693; Email: [email protected] (Leslie) (7865) Nancy Black Norelli, 1340 Harding Place, Charlotte, NC 28204; 704/376-5484; FAX: 704/3765485; Email: [email protected] (Ronald) (7940) Mark P. Henriques, 3500 One Wachovia Center, 301 South College Street, Charlotte, NC 28202; 704/331-4912; FAX: 704/338-7830; Email: [email protected] (Anna Guyton) (18701) A. Todd Brown, Hunton & Williams, LLP, 101 S. Tryon Street, Suite 3500, Charlotte, NC 28280; 704/378-4727; FAX: 704/ 378-4890; Email: [email protected] (Jacqui) (13806) David N. Allen, Hedrick Gardner Kincheloe & Garofalo, LLP, P.O. Box 30397, Charlotte, NC 28230; 704.602.8015; Email: [email protected] (Kimberly) (9095) Robert C. Bowers, Moore & VanAllen, PLLC, 100 N. Tryon St., Ste. 4700, Charlotte, NC 28202; 704.331.3560; Email: [email protected] (Sandy) (23009) Eben T. Rawls, III, Rawls, Scheer, Foster & Mingo, PLLC, 1011 E. Morehead Street, Suite 300, Charlotte, NC 28204; 704.376.3200; Email: [email protected] (Leslie) (8478) Sonya C. McGraw, Gaston County Schools; 943 Osceola Street, P.O. Box 1397, Gastonia, NC 28053; 704/866-6119; Email: [email protected] (Jay) (18318) Ralph W. Meekins, 1219 Fallston Road, Shelby, NC 28150; 704/487-1234, FAX: 704/487-1251; Email: [email protected] (Loann) (13611) Anna Hamrick, 56 College Street, Suite 201, Asheville, NC 28801; 828.253.0336; FAX: 828.253.0886; Email: [email protected] (Sam Snead) (23150) H. Russell Neighbors, 28 S. Main Street, Marion, NC 28752; 828.652.5355; Email: [email protected] (Patty) (12503) Christopher S. Stepp, 112 S. Main Street, Hendersonville, NC 28792; 828/693-4135; Email: [email protected] (Heather) (16933) Gerald Collins, Jr., Collins Law Firm, P.O. Drawer 740, Murphy, NC 28906; 828/837-9456; FAX: 828/837-3635; Email: [email protected] (Sherry) (9169) PUBLIC MEMBERS Paul L. Fulton, Jr., Forsyth County Finance Dept. 201 N. Chestnut Street; Winston-Salem, NC 27101; 336/703-2051; FAX 336/727-8045, Email: [email protected] (Vera) James W. Hall, 751 Mt. Moriah Road, Ahoskie, NC 27910; cell: 252/358-1662; office: 252/358-1662; Email: [email protected] (Bettie) Margaret H. Dickson, 501 Valley Road, Fayetteville, NC 28305; Cell 910/977-8937; Email: [email protected]

DISTRICT BAR OFFICERS Updated April 12, 2016

DIVISION 1 District 1 (Terms expire 1/17) (2 Year Terms) David F. Mills, PA 1559-B Booker Dairy Rd. Smithfield, NC 27577

Benjamin Gallop-Vice-President 2502 S. Croatan Hwy. Nags Heads, NC 27959 252/441-0871 [email protected] Lamar Armstrong III-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 27 Smithfield, NC 27577 919/934-1575 [email protected] Kim Pellini-Past-President 200 E. Colonial Ave. Elizabeth City, NC 27909 252/331-4743 [email protected]

District 2 (Terms expire 7/16) Lloyd Williams-President 4428 Loop Rd. Scranton, NC 27875 252/946-0141 [email protected] Curtis S. Potter-Vice-President 116 Adams St. Plymouth, NC 27962 252/793-5823 [email protected] Sarah A. Homes – Secretary/Treasurer 279 White Plains Rd. Engelhard NC 27824 252/917-2712 [email protected]

Lisa Coltrain-Past-President

1

PO Box 1186 Williamston, NC 27892 252/809-5110 252/809-5111 Fax [email protected]

District 3A (Terms expire 12/16) Joe Leahy-President PO Box 6028 Greenville, NC 27834 252/847-7468 [email protected] Jordan Smith-Vice-President 1717 W. 5th St. Greenville, NC 27834 252/902-3116 [email protected] Jarrette Pittman-Secretary/Treasurer 138 Parkridge Ct. Rocky Mount, NC 27804 252/443-5594 [email protected] Mary Stokes-Past-President 1510 E. Arlington Blvd., Ste. A Greenville, NC 27858 252/758-4100 [email protected]

District 3B (Terms expire 12/16) Ben Eisner-President 405 Middle St. New Bern, NC 28560 252/633-1930 [email protected] William Joseph Kennedy II-Vice-President 613 Cedar St. Ste. A Beaufort, NC 28516 252/728-1208 Heather Beam-Secretary/Treasurer 325 Pollock St. New Bern, NC 28560 [email protected] Sharon G. Scudder-Past-President 405 Evans St. Ste. B Big Rock Landing Morehead City, NC 28557 252/648-0115

2

[email protected]

District 4 (Terms expire 10/16) Trevor James Avery- President 636 Court St. Jacksonville, NC 28540 910/347-0161 [email protected] Tiffany N. Naylor-Vice-President PO Box 2148 Clinton, NC 28329 910/299-0935 [email protected] Shannon Page-Treasurer/Secretary 381 Woods Crossroads Rd. Benson, NC 27504 [email protected] Braxton Price-Past-President PO Box 277 Kenansville, NC 28349 910/296-9838 910/296-9636 Fax [email protected]

District 5 (Terms expire 11/16) Alex Dale-President PO Box 7068 Wilmington, NC 28406 910/794-4800 910/794-4806 Fax [email protected] Tonya Turner-Vice-President PO Box 1386 Burgaw, NC 28425 910/259-3180 910/259-3186 Fax [email protected] Clay Collier - Secretary 5002 Randall Pkwy. Wilmington, NC 28403 910/762-9711 910/256-0310 Fax [email protected]

William Augustus Oden III- At Large Member for New Hanover PO Box 7068 Wilmington, NC 28406

3

910/794-4800 [email protected] Jacqueline Newton –At Large Member for Pender PO Box 1580 101 W. Fremont St. Burgaw, NC 28425 910/300-6391 [email protected] Lindsey Luther- Past-President 316 Princess St. Wilmington, NC 28401 910/772-6610 [email protected]

District 6 (Terms expire 1/17) Ronnie C. Reaves-President PO Box 587 Weldon, NC 27890 252/536-2503 252/536-5130 Fax [email protected] Michael Petty Hinton-Vice-President PO.Box 444 Murfreesboro, NC 27855 252/398-8101 [email protected] Maria R. Jones – Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 448 Murfreesboro, NC 27855 252/398-4171 255/398-4051 Fax [email protected] Jonathan E. Huddleston –Past-President PO Box 100 Windsor, NC 27983 252/794-3161 [email protected]

District 7 (Terms expire 11/16) Robert C.M. Rountree-President PO Drawer 279 Wilson, NC 27894 252/237-3153 [email protected] Sharon Sprinkle-1st Vice-President 4497 Sunset Ave. Rocky Mount, NC 27804

4

252/451-1515 [email protected] Michael D. Gaynor-2nd Vice-President PO Box 757 Nashville, NC 27856 252/459-2121 [email protected] Kelly H. Shore – Secretary PO Box 4751 Rocky Mount, NC 27803 252/557-2224 [email protected] J. Mike Eatmon – Treasurer PO Box 10 Nashville, NC 27856 252/469-9000 252/459-9797 Fax [email protected] Kristen P. Miller-Past-President 130 S. Franklin St. Rocky Mount, NC 27804 252/972-7042 [email protected]

District 8 (Terms expire 11/16) Michael A. Muskus-President PO Box 2468 Kinston, NC 28501 252/527-5505 [email protected] Jonathan Smith-Vice-President PO Box 11050 Goldsboro, NC 27532-1050 919/432-1505 [email protected] Ashley Fillippeli Stucker-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 3169 Kinston, NC 28502 252/527-8000 [email protected] Tonya Nicole Davis Barber- Past-President PO Box 1493 Goldsboro, NC 27533 919/738-3228 [email protected]

5

DIVISION II District 9 (Terms expire 12/16) Joyce W. Fischer-President PO Box 567 Oxford, NC 27565 919/603-1454 [email protected] Deborah Leigh Holtzman-Vice-President PO Box 139 Henderson, NC 27536 252/438-8131 [email protected] Gerald Thomas Koinis-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 247 Oxford, NC 27565 919-693-8161 [email protected] C. Boyd Sturges, III- Past-President PO Box 708 Louisburg, NC 27549 919/496-2137 [email protected]

District 9A (Terms expire 12/16) J. Hoyte Stultz III-President Caswell County Chief ADA 336/459-4010 [email protected] William Russell Johnston-Vice-President PO Box 999 Yanceyville, NC 27379 336/694-4363 [email protected] Julie A. Ramsey-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 3130 Roxboro, NC 27573 336/599-5004 [email protected] Wallace W. Bradsher Jr. –Past- President PO Box 1143 Roxboro, NC 27573 336/503-5252 336/503-5253 Fax [email protected]

6

District 10 (Terms expire 12/16) Brian O. Beverly-President PO Box 31627 Raleigh, NC 27622 919/782-6860 [email protected] Ashley H. Campbell –President-Elect PO Box 31507 Raleigh, NC 27622-1507 [email protected] Meghan N. Knight-Secretary 101 SAS Campus Dr. Cary, NC 27513 [email protected] Adam M. Gottsegen-Treasurer 3700 Glenwood Ave., Ste. 500 Raleigh, NC 27612 [email protected] Whitney D.G. Von Hamm-Executive Director PO Box 3686 Cary, NC 27519-3686 919/677-9903 [email protected] Shaula A. Brannan-Membership Coordinator 8000 Weston Pkwy. Cary, NC 27513 919/659-1441 919/657-1564 [email protected] Mark A. Finkelstein-Past-President PO Box 27525 Raleigh, NC 27611 919/755-8819 [email protected]

District 11A (Terms expire 1/17) Rebecca Whitaker –President PO Box 4477 Sanford, NC 27331 919/774-4445 [email protected] Kathryn Tart- Vice-President PO Box 2177 Dunn, NC 28335 910/892-3112

7

[email protected] Jasmine Lucas-Secretary/Treasurer 1502 Woodland Avenue Sanford, NC 27330 919/775-5653 [email protected] Charlene Edwards-Past-President PO Box 2446 Lillington, NC 27546 910/893-1128 [email protected]

District 11B (Terms expire 12/16) David F. Mills-President 1559-B Booker Dairy Rd. Smithfield, NC 27577 919/934-7235 [email protected] Scott Johnson-Vice-President PO Box 119 Smithfield, NC 27577 919/934-6187 [email protected] Lamar Armstrong-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 27 Smithfield, NC 27577 919/934-1575 [email protected] Alan B. “Chip” Hewett-Past-President PO Box 369 Selma, NC 27576 919/202-9811 [email protected]

District 12 (Terms expire 7/16) Victoria Hardin-President 330 Dick St. Fayetteville, NC 28301 910/323-3500 ext. 215 910/323-0066 Fax [email protected] Mark. L. Hearp-1st Vice-President PO Box 2275 Fayetteville, NC 28302 910/323-4600 910/323-3403 Fax [email protected]

8

Cull Jordan-2nd Vice-President P O Drawer 209 Fayetteville, NC 28302 910/484-8195 [email protected] Thomas Neville-Secretary PO Box 705 Fayetteville, NC 28302 910/433-4433 [email protected] Deanna Coleman-Treasurer 4317 Ramsey St. Fayetteville, NC 28311 910/864-6888 [email protected] Hilton “Hutch” Hutchens- Past-President 4317 Ramsey St. Fayetteville, NC 28302 910/864-6888 [email protected]

District 13 (Terms expire 4/16) Allen M. Johnson-President PO Box 2212 Elizabethtown, NC 28337 910/862-2252 [email protected] Heath Nance-President-Elect District Attorney's Office 110 Courthouse Sq. Whiteville, NC 28472 910/641-4462 Jason Disbrow-Vice-President PO Box 11058 Southport, NC 28461 910/475-5076 [email protected] Andrew Wall-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 72 505 Harwood St. Elizabethtown, NC 28337 [email protected] Calvin Chandler-Past-President PO Box 3125 Shallotte, NC 28459 910/755-5005 910/755-5050 Fax

9

[email protected]

District 14 (Terms expire 6/15) Dorothy Hairston Mitchell-President 510 S. Dillard St., Ste. 4700 Durham, NC 27701 919/808-3327 919/808-3040 Fax [email protected] Fredrick S. Battaglia Jr.-Vice-President 120 E. Parrish St., Ste. 210 Durham, NC 27701 919/688-7199 [email protected] Antoinette Hilliard-Secretary 510 S. Dillard St., Ste. 4700 Durham, NC 27701 919/808-3023 [email protected] Catherine Wilson-Treasurer 3211 Shannon Rd., Ste. 620 Durham, NC 27707 919/493-0584 [email protected] Bonnie B. Biggs-Executive Director Durham County Bar Association PO Box 593 Durham, NC 27702 919/682-2012 [email protected] Carlos E. Mahoney-Past-President PO Drawer 3865 Durham, NC 27702 919/683-2135 [email protected]

District 15A (Terms expire 12/16) Molly Anne Whitlatch-President PO Box 22106 Greensboro, NC 27420 336/333-6387 [email protected] Hillary Whitaker-Vice-President 3132 Commerce Place, Ste. C Burlington, NC 27215

10

336/517-0087 [email protected] Jamie Hamlett-Secretary 319 N. Graham-Hopedale Rd. Burlington, NC 27217 336/570-6548 [email protected] Benjamin D. Overby-Treasurer PO Drawer 2958 Burlington, NC 27216 336/227-8851 [email protected] Marissa West-Past-President 522 S. Lexington Ave. Burlington, NC 27215 336/227-8851 336/226-3866 Fax [email protected]

District 15B (Terms expire 5/16) Brian M. Ferrell- President PO Box 51579 Durham, NC 27717-1579 919/490-0500 [email protected] Hathway Pendergrass-Vice-President 410 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919/929-0323 [email protected] Andrew Slawter-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 607 Pittsboro, NC 27312 919/542-2400 [email protected] Gregory Herman-Giddens-Past-President 205 Providence Rd. Chapel Hill, NC 27514 919/493-6351 [email protected]

District 16A (Terms expire 12/16) Ian Bloom-President Public Defender's Office 125 E. Edinborough Ave. Raeford, NC 28376

11

[email protected] Angela Carter-Vice-President PO Box 399 Raeford, NC 28376 910/248-6039 [email protected] Timothy Snead-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 1548 Laurinburg, NC 28353 910/506-4373 [email protected] Ida Baker- Past-President 119 Live Oak Dr. Raeford, NC 28376 910/565-2369 [email protected]

District 16B (Terms expire 12/16) Jack H. Moody Jr. - President 417 Highland Ave. Lumberton, NC 28358 910/671-3364 [email protected] Vercelia Y. Freeman-Vice-President 219 Emma Jane Rd. Saint Pauls, NC 28384 910/277-3237 [email protected] Ronette A. Gerber-Secretary UNC Pembroke PO Box 1510 One University Drive Pembroke, NC 28372 910/521-6201 Katherine H. Davis-Treasurer PO Box 1571 Lumberton, NC 28359 910/739-8196 [email protected] Norris M. Grantham-Past-President PO Box 1448 Lumberton, NC 28359 910/738-5277 [email protected]

District 16C (Terms expire 1/17)

12

Aaron Bates-President PO Box 1419 Wadesboro, NC 28170 704/694-0195 [email protected] Clifford Ray Herndon-Vice-President 322 Richmond Rd. Rockingham, NC 28379 [email protected] Ira B. Pittman – Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 758 Rockingham, NC 28330 910/895-4018 910/895-0101 Fax [email protected] J. Brent Garner-Past-President PO Box 1224 Rockingham, NC 28380 910/997-4700 910/997-4779 Fax [email protected]

DIVISION III District 17A (Terms expire 7/16) Wendy Walker-President PO Box 143 Reidsville, NC 27323 336/613-1262 [email protected] Shireen Z. Wayne-Secretary PO Box 35 Wentworth, NC 27375 [email protected] Scott K. Skidmore-Treasurer PO Box 899 Reidsville, NC 27323 336/349-4364 [email protected] Haynes Dallas-Past-President 117 E. Murphy St. Madison, NC 27025 336/548-2309 [email protected]

District 17B (Terms expire 1/17) (Two-year terms)

13

Brandon West- President PO Box 775 King, NC 27021 336/983-3177 336/983-8626 [email protected] Karen Adams-First Vice-President 332 N. Main St. Dobson, NC 27017 336/356-4900 336/356-2900 Fax [email protected] Quentin Harris-Second Vice-President 225 Oak Ridge Dr. Mount Airy, NC 27030 336/918-6384 Hugh B. Campbell, III-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 1846 Mount Airy, NC 27030 336/719-1700 336/719-1703 Fax [email protected] James N. Freeman, Jr.-Past-President PO Box 347 Elkin, NC 28621 336/835-4407 336/526-3908 Fax [email protected]

District 18 (Terms expire 8/16) Afi Johnson-Parris - President 208 W. Wendover Ave. Greensboro, NC 27401 336/333-2244 [email protected] Kenneth R. Keller – President-Elect 235 N. Edgeworth St. Greensboro, NC 27401 336/478-1125 [email protected] Sarah H. Roane - Secretary 324 W. Market St. Greensboro, NC 27401 336/332-6128 [email protected] Parrish L. Peddrick - Treasurer 300 N. Greene St., 6th Floor Greensboro, NC 27401

14

336/378-4085 [email protected] Diane Lowe-Administrator Greensboro Bar Association 122 North Elm St., Ste. 805 PO Box 1825 Greensboro, NC 336/378-0300 [email protected] James W. Bryan – Past President 701 Green Valley Rd., Ste. 100 Greensboro, NC 27408 336/387-5122 [email protected]

District 18H (Terms expire 12/16) David K. Rosenblutt-President PO Box 2756 High Point, NC 27261 336/883-6177 [email protected] Kimberly H. Floyd-Vice-President 401 S Main St High Point, NC 27260 336/886-5031 [email protected] Nathan K. Chriswan-Secretary/Treasurer PO Drawer 2086 High Point, NC 27261 [email protected] David H. Idol II-Past-President PO Box 1776 High Point, NC 27261 [email protected]

District 19A (Terms expire 12/16) Judge Christy Wilhelm-President PO Box 1841 Concord, NC 28026 704/262-5512 [email protected] Annette Heim-Vice-President PO Box 743 Concord, NC 28026 704/788-3262 [email protected]

15

Kimberly Herrick-Secretary PO Box 528 Concord, NC 28026 704/782-3315 [email protected] Heather Mobley-Treasurer 363 Church St. North, Ste. 260-H Concord, NC 28085 980-354-1390 Fredrick Joseph Kraus- Past-President 285 Church St., North Concord, NC 28025 704/707-4224 704/943-9166 [email protected]

District 19B (Terms expire 12/16) Jeannie Blake-President PO Box 611 Troy, NC 27371 [email protected] Sarah Lanier-Vice-President 350 N Cox St., Ste. 25 Asheboro, NC 27203 336/629-6529 [email protected] Walter Jenkins-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 1208 Biscoe, NC 27209 [email protected] Jeff Suggs- Past-President PO Box 4730 Asheboro, NC 27204-4730 336/626-1201 [email protected]

District 19C (Terms expire 11/16) M. Reid Acree, Jr. - President 225 N. Main St. Salisbury, NC 28144 704/633-0860 [email protected] Emily Hunter-Vice-President PO Drawer 1617 Salisbury, NC 28145 704/636-7100

16

[email protected] Richard R. Reamer – Secretary/Treasurer PO Drawer 1617 Salisbury, NC 28145 704/636-7100 704/636-2284 Fax [email protected] Kathryn C. Setzer-Past-President PO Box 4479 Salisbury, NC 28145 704/202-0515 [email protected]

District 19D (Terms expire 3/16) Robert Garner IV-President PO Box 1540 Carthage, NC 28327 910-947-1500 [email protected] William H. Pate-Vice-President PO Box 1669 Pinehurst, NC 28370 910/295-2161 [email protected] Austin Morris-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 2558 Southern Pines, NC 28388 910/255-0004 [email protected] Arthur M. Blue –Past-President PO Box 1540 Carthage, NC 28327 910/947-1500 [email protected]

District 20A (Terms expire 9/16) Patrick Currie-President 214 E. North St. Albemarle, NC 28001 704/983-6116 [email protected] Andrew Scales-Vice-President PO Box 2300 Albemarle, NC 28002 704/985-1332 [email protected]

17

J. Kent Trull-Secretary/Treasurer 2036 Woodhurst Ln. Albemarle, NC 28001 704/983-3167 [email protected] Jim Senter-Past-President PO Box 400 Albemarle, NC 28002 704/982-2141 [email protected]

District 20B (Terms expire 12/16) Tracy Regan-President PO Box 2033 Monroe, NC 28111 704/289-3229 [email protected] Cynthia Brooks-Vice-President 100 Winchester Ave. Monroe, NC 28110 704/283-5070 [email protected] Isla Tabrizi-Treasurer 112 N. Main St. Monroe, NC 28111 704/ 289-3250 [email protected] Travis Green-Secretary 314 N. Hayne St. PO Drawer 99 Monroe, NC 28112 704/289-4577 [email protected] Erin S. Hucks-Past-President 211 N. Main St., Ste. G Monroe, NC 28111 704/289-3229

District 21 (Terms expire 7/16) George Cleland IV-President One Salem Tower, Ste. 303 119 Brookstown Ave. Winston Salem, NC 27101-5400 336/725-0234 [email protected] Josh H. Bennett-President-Elect 1560 Westbrook Plaza Dr.

18

Winston-Salem, NC 27103 336/765-3121 [email protected] Allison Tomberlin-Vice-President PO Box 2513 Winston-Salem, NC 27120 336/727-2509 [email protected] Jones Pharr Byrd Jr.-Secretary 860 W. Fifth St. Winston Salem, NC 27101 336/725-1304 [email protected] Kathleen DuBois-Treasurer 1100-A S.Stratford Rd., Ste. 523 Winston Salem, NC 27103 336/201-0730 [email protected] Elliot A. Fus-Past-President PO Drawer 25008 Winston-Salem, NC 27114 336/293-9000 336/293-9030 Fax [email protected] Sandy Dickstein-Admin. Assistant 2135 New Walkertown Rd. Winston-Salem, NC 27101 336/760-1232 [email protected]

District 22A (Terms expire 10/16) Ronnie Crisco-President 330 S. Main St. Mooresville, NC 28115 704/664-2162 [email protected] Richard Webb-Vice-President PO Box 3010 Mooresville, NC 28117 [email protected] Christopher Main-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 1146 Statesville, NC 28687 704/878-5401 [email protected] Christina Clodfelter- Past-President

19

316 E.Broad St. Statesville, NC 28677 704/873-2172 [email protected]

District 22B (Terms expire 11/16) Brandy Koontz-Stockert- President 132 W. Brickwalk Ct. Mocksville, NC 27028 336/751-6235 [email protected] Michael Eldredge-Vice-President 19 E. 2nd Ave. Ste. C Lexington, NC 27292 336/499-1955 [email protected] Courtney Roller-Secretary 40 Salem St. Thomasville, NC 27360 336/475-0099 [email protected] Judge Mark Klass-Treasurer PO Box 1343 Lexington, NC 27292 336/249-4797 Shawn Fraley-Past-President Barnes Grimes Bunce & Fraley, PLLC PO Box 476 Lexington, NC 27293 336/249-9128 [email protected]

District 23 (Terms expire 12/16)

Stacy Adams-President PO Box 989 Sparta, NC 28675 336/372-6999 336/372-5164 [email protected] Amy Brodland-Vice-President PO Box 67 West Jefferson, NC 28694 336/246-7172 [email protected] Robert P. Laney-Secretary/Treasurer 906 Main St. North Wilkesboro, NC 28659 336/838-1111

20

[email protected] Charles Fred Bauer-Past-President 500 Courthouse Dr., Ste. 2022 Wilkesboro, NC 28697 336/651-4410 [email protected]

DIVISION IV District 24 (Terms expire 12/15) Nichole and Peter to work on getting current officers. Per Kathryn Hemphill we need to contact Donny Laws for Yancey County president.

Donny J. Laws – Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 397 Burnsville, NC 28714 828/682-9645 Shannon Aldous-Past-President 827 W. King Street Boone, NC 28607 828/355-9543 [email protected]

District 25 (Terms expire 10/15) Richard S. Holloway- President 1005 Norwood St. SW Lenoir, NC 28645 828/757-2904 [email protected] Michael Paul Thomas-Vice-President PO Box 218 Hickory, NC 28601 828/322-7741 [email protected] Timothy J. Rooks-Secretary/Treasurer 305 E. Union St. Ste. A-145 Morganton, NC 28655 828/438-8802 [email protected] Steven Schoeberle-Director 2981 Village Dr. Morganton, NC 28655 828/413-3542 [email protected] Edward H. Blair Jr.-Director

21

210 Ridge St. NW PO Box 776 Lenoir, NC 28645 828/758-0141 Kimberly H. Whitley-Director PO Box 218 Hickory, NC 28603 828/322-7741 [email protected] Lyndon Helton-Past-President 827 Highland Ave. NE Hickory, NC 28601 828/328-9966 [email protected]

District 26 (Terms expire 6/16) Cory Hohnbaum-President 100 N. Tryon St., Ste. 3900 Charlotte, NC 28202 704/503-2561 704/503-2622 Fax [email protected] F. Lane Williamson-President-Elect 301 E. Park Avenue Charlotte, NC 28203 704/338-1220 [email protected] Heather W. Culp-Vice-President 1701 South Blvd. Charlotte, NC 28203 704/377-4300 [email protected] Christopher C. Lam-Secretary Nexsen Pruet, PLLC 227 West Trade St., Ste. 1550 Charlotte, NC 28202 704/338-5359 Tracy H. Hewett-Treasurer 700 E. Fourth St., Ste. 400 Charlotte, NC 28202 704/686-0943 704/686-0901 Fax [email protected] Carla N. Archie-Past-President 300 S. College St. Charlotte, NC 28202 704/374-4902 704/383-0649 Fax

22

[email protected] Jill Manchester Wiggins Membership/Database Coordinator* Mecklenburg County Bar 2850 Zebulon Ave. Charlotte, NC 28208 704/375-8624 x107 [email protected] *Please address all membership and dues questions to Jill Wiggins

District 27A (Terms expire 11/16) Lauren Lowry- President 117 E. Main Ave. Gastonia, NC 28052 704/861-9199 [email protected] Jamie Hester-Vice-President 6313 W. Wilkinson Blvd. Belmont, NC 28012 [email protected] Megan Shepard-Treasurer 190 S. South St. Gastonia, NC 28052 704/750-1394 [email protected] Joy Chappell-Secretary PO Box 2206 420 E. Long Ave. Gastonia, NC 28053-2206 704/865-1900 [email protected] James Richardson-Past-President 325 N. Marietta St., Ste 3122 Gastonia, NC 28052 [email protected]

District 27B (Terms expire 11/16) Rebecca Yoder-President PO Box 38 Lincolnton, NC 28092 704/735-1423 [email protected] Lacey Beam-Vice-President 111 N. Lafayette St. Shelby, NC 28150 704/482-6329

23

[email protected] Van Graham-Secretary/Treasurer PO Box 1060 Boiling Springs, NC 28017 [email protected] Brittany Waters-Past-President 522 S. DeKalb St. Shelby, NC 28150 704/471-0808 [email protected]

District 28 (Terms expire 6/16) Brad Stark-President 35 N. Market St. Asheville, NC 28801 828/505-4300 828/505-4302 Fax [email protected] Natalie W. Bacon- President-Elect NC Dept. of Justice 952 Old US Hwy. 70 Black Mountain, NC 28711 828/669-3388 828/669-3365 Fax [email protected] Annika Brock-Vice-President 14 S. Pack Square, Ste. 406 Asheville, NC 28801 828/254-6200 [email protected] Dustin James McIntee -Secretary One Oak Plaza Ste. 209 Asheville, NC 28801 828/708-7850 [email protected] Bo Carpenter-Treasurer 72 Patton Ave. Asheville, NC 28801 828/252-7381 [email protected] Lisa-Gaye Hall-Bar Administrator 28th Judicial District Bar PO Box 7391 Asheville, NC 28802 828/252-5733 [email protected] Jacqueline Grant-Past-President BB&T Building, Ste. 1100

24

One West Pack Square Asheville, NC 28801 828/258-6909 [email protected]

District 29A (Terms expire 10/16) Brian W. King- President 215 N. Main St. Rutherfordton, NC 28139 828/286-3332 828/286-1110 Fax [email protected] Aaron Walker- Vice-President McDowell County DSS PO Box 338 Marion, NC 28752 828/652-3355 [email protected] John B. Crotts-Secretary 215 N. Main St. Rutherfordton, NC 28139 828/286-3332 828/286-1110 Fax [email protected] David Denninger-Treasurer 21 S. Main St. Marion, NC 28752 305/469-9177 [email protected] Tiffany Morgan-Past-President 124 E. Court St. Marion, NC 28752 828/652-2900 [email protected]

District 29B (Terms expire 11/16) Doug Mundy-President 117 Forest Lake Dr. Asheville, NC 28803 828/884-3155 [email protected] Douglas H. Pearson-Vice-President 611 N. Church St., Ste. 109 Hendersonville, NC 28792 828/424-9859 [email protected] Scott Sheffron-Secretary/Treasurer

25

Scott H. Sheffron 317 N. Washington St. Hendersonville, NC 28739 828/698-9889 [email protected] Tony C. Dalton-Past-President PO Box 1268 Brevard, NC 28712 828/884-2334 [email protected]

District 30 (Terms expire 1/17) (2 Year Terms) Jason Arnold-President PO Box 1002 Franklin, NC 28744 828/349-7210 [email protected] Zeb Smathers-Vice-President 118 Main St., Ste. B Canton, NC 28716 828/648-8240 [email protected] Bonnie J. Claxton-Secretary/ Treasurer PO Box 426 Sylva, NC 28779 828/586-8931 [email protected] Diane Sherrill- Past-President PO Box 2043 Sylva, NC 28779 828/586-4051 [email protected]

26

Chapter 3

Additional NCBA Services, Awards and Resources

North Carolina Bar Association Membership Application Please complete the information below. This information will be used to maintain your individual membership record.

1. Name & Contact Information

Salutation:



Mr. 

Ms.



Other: __________

Name: _________________________________________________________________________________________ Preferred Name: ______________________________

Spouse’s Name: __________________________________

Mailing Address: _________________________________________________________________________________ City: _________________ State: ____ Zip: _________ County: _________________________________________ Street Address: __________________________________________________________________________________ City: _________________ State: ____ Zip: _________ County: ________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________________

Fax: ____________________________________________

Primary Email (required): ___________________________________________

Date of Birth: ________________

Employer: ______________________________________________________________________________________ Position Title: _________________________________

Referred by: _____________________________________

Law School: __________________________________

Law School Graduation Date: _______________________

N.C. State Bar Number: ________________________

Date Admitted: ___________________________________

Other State(s) Licensed: _________________________ Date Admitted: ___________________________________ NCCP Number: _______________________________ I am a:  Government Atty.

 Law Student

Date Admitted: ___________________________________

 Legal Services Atty.

 Paralegal

 Private Practitioner

It is the responsibility of the individual occupying the positional membership and the agency to notify the NCBA of any changes to the individual’s contact information, including if a new individual occupies the positional membership.

2. Gender & Race/Ethnicity

(optional)

For demographic purposes only, please identify your gender and race/ethnicity below. Please check all that apply.

 Female

 Male

 African-American

 Asian-American

 Caucasian

 Hispanic

 Native American

 Other: ______________________________________________________________________________________

3. Membership Classification ¨ Regular | Licensed in good standing with the N.C. State Bar or resident of N.C. who is licensed and in good standing with a state bar other than N.C. ¨ Sustainer | Sustaining members meet the requirements of Regular members and enable the Association to accomplish goals outlined in the mission statement and further the implementation of the Long-Range Plan.

¨ Out-of-state | Resident of a state other than N.C. and licensed in good standing with a state bar other than N.C. Out-of-state members cannot hold NCBA office, cannot vote and are not eligible for insurance programs; however, Out-of-state members can participate in all other membership privileges.

¨ Retired | Inactive Retired Status with the North Carolina State Bar and who are 60 years of age or older. ¨ Law Student | Free Law Student Division membership is open to all law students in ABA-accredited programs. ¨ Paralegal Division | Two classes of paralegal membership are open to those who perform or are eligible to

perform substantive legal work under the direction of an attorney. Paralegal students will need a separate application to apply for membership. Definitions for both Regular and Provisional classes can be found at paralegaldivision.ncbar.org.

Continued on back...

Continued from front...

4. Basic Membership Dues

The NCBA membership year is July 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016. Dues are not prorated. MEMBERSHIP TYPE

REGULAR

SUSTAINER

 Paralegal Membership

$60

N/A

 Paralegal Provisional

$60

N/A

 Law Student Membership

Free

N/A

Anticipated Graduation Date: ___________________________

 First year licensed to practice

Free

N/A

This includes attorneys licensed by exam or comity in North Carolina or attorneys licensed for the first time ever by exam in any state in 2015 or 2016. Select one section from the list of sections for a free year of section membership. You may join additional sections at the dues levels indicated; the lowest priced section selected will be free.

 First licensed* in 2014

$95

$190

 First licensed* in 2013

$120

$240

 First licensed* in 2012

$135

$270

 First licensed* in 2011

$195

$390

 First licensed* in or before 2010 $290

$580

 Retired

$190

$95

* Licensed in any state Note: The NCBA is a voluntary association for the legal profession in North Carolina. The NCBA is unrelated to the North Carolina State Bar or the Board of Law Examiners. Membership in the State Bar is mandatory. The State Bar and the Board of Law Exami­ners are the agencies that govern the licensing and discipline of lawyers in North Carolina.

5. Section Dues Please check all those you wish to join

                       ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨    

Administrative Law* Antitrust & Complex Business Disputes Law Appellate Practice Bankruptcy Business Law Constitutional Rights & Responsibilities Construction Law Corporate Counsel (full-time in-house counsel only) Criminal Justice Dispute Resolution* Education Law Elder & Special Needs Law Environmental, Energy & Natural Resources Law* Estate Planning & Fiduciary Law Family Law Government & Public Sector Health Law Insurance Law Intellectual Property Law* International Law & Practice* Juvenile Justice & Children’s Rights* Labor & Employment Law Law Practice Management & Technology* Litigation Military & Veterans Law* Real Property Solo, Small Firm & General Practice Sports & Entertainment Tax Workers’ Compensation* Zoning, Planning & Land Use*

$35 $40 $45 $45 $45 $45 $40 $45 $35 $40 $35 $45 $40 $40 $45 $35 $40 $45 $45 $40 $35 $40 $45 $40 $40 $45 $40 $40 $40 $40 $40

*Non-lawyer affiliate members may join. Please see section application for specific affiliate information.

6. Payment Total

To submit this application, please:

Basic Membership Dues (from Section 4) $_________

 Fax to 919.677.1775

Section Dues Total (from Section 5) Total Amount Enclosed

$_________

$_________

 Mail to NCBA Membership Department P.O. Box 3688 | Cary, NC 27519-3688 Or apply online at www.ncbar.org

7. Payment Method  Check

(make payable to the NCBA)

 Credit Card:

 Visa

 MasterCard

 AmEx

 Discover

Card Number: _______________________________ Exp. Date: ___________________________ Name on Card: ______________________________ Signature: ___________________________ I hereby make an official application to membership in the North Carolina Bar Association. Signature: ___________________________________________________ Date: _______________

SECTION MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION Please complete the information below. Only use this application if you are already an NCBA member (including Paralegal and Law Student Division members) or if you are a non-lawyer joining a single section as an affiliate member. To submit this application, please mail to NCBA Membership Department, P.O. Box 3688, Cary NC 27519-3688, fax to 919.677.1775 or apply online at www.ncbar.org.

I am a:

Section Affiliation Dues:

 NCBA member | NCBA #: ________________________

Please check all those you wish to join

 Paralegal Division member

 Administrative Law*

$35

 Antitrust & Complex Business Disputes Law

$40

 Appellate Practice

$45

 Law Student Division member  Non-lawyer affiliate member (Only available in Administrative Law, Dispute Reso­lu­tion, Environment, Energy & Natural Resources Law, Intellect­ual Property Law, International Law & Practice, Juvenile Justice & Children’s Rights, Law Practice Management, Military & veterans Law, Workers’ Compensation and Zoning, Planning & Land Use.)

 Bankruptcy $45  Business Law

$45

 Constitutional Rights & Responsibilities

$45

 Construction Law

$40

 Corporate Counsel**

$45

Contact Information:

 Criminal Justice

$35

 Mr.

 Dispute Resolution*

$40

 Education Law

$35

 Elder & Special Needs Law

$45

 Ms.

 Other: ______________________

Name: _____________________________________________ Mailing Address: _____________________________________ ___________________________________________________

 Environment, Energy & Natural

City: _____________________ County: __________________

Resources Law*

$40

 Estate Planning & Fiduciary Law

$40

State: _____________________ ZIP:_____________________

 Family Law $45

Business Phone: _____________________________________

 Government & Public Sector

Business Fax: ________________________________________

 Health Law $40

Email: ______________________________________________

 Insurance Law

$45

 Intellectual Property Law*

$45

 International Law & Practice*

$40

 Juvenile Justice & Children’s Rights*

$35

 Labor & Employment Law

$40

 Law Practice Management & Technology*

$45

Firm/Employer: ______________________________________ Payment TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED:

$ _______________

 Check (make payable to the NCBA)  Credit Card:

 Visa

 MasterCard  AmEx

$35

 Litigation $40  Military & Veterans Law*

$40

Card #: ____________________________________________

 Real Property $45

Name on Card: ______________________________________

 Solo, Small Firm & General Practice

$40

Exp. Date: ___________________________________________

 Sports & Entertainment

$40

Signature: ___________________________________________ Return completed application to: North Carolina Bar Association Membership Department P.O. Box 3688 Cary, NC 27519-3688 Fax to 919.677.1775 or apply online at www.ncbar.org

 Tax $40  Workers’ Compensation*

$40

 Zoning, Planning & Land Use*

$40

*Non-lawyer affiliate members may join. Please see section application for specific affiliate information. **Membership is limited to full-time, in-house counsel

Last updated October 2015

Administrative Law | Represents the interests of lawyers who represent and practice before state and local regulatory boards and commissions, the Office of Administrative Hearings and occupational licensing boards. Also addresses matters related to the regulatory rulemaking process. Affiliate membership is open to non-lawyers who are actively involved in the promulgation, execution or enforcement of administrative rules Antitrust & Complex Business Disputes Law | Deals with issues relating to antitrust law, unfair and deceptive trade practices, trade regulation and consumer protection. Newsletter highlights recent cases affecting members’ areas of interest. Appellate Practice | Brings together association members who have a special interest in appellate practice, provide networking and educational opportunities in appellate practice, and promotes excellence in North Carolina’s appellate courts. Bankruptcy | Promotes networking and education for practitioners in all areas of bankruptcy practice, both business and consumer areas, and among members who practice in the three federal bankruptcy districts. The ListManager provides valuable discussion of bankruptcy issues faced by members. Business Law | Provides information practice tools and member activities related to business law practice. Proposes and monitors changes to state business laws and regulations. Constitutional Rights & Responsibilities | Provides forum for all practice areas interested in issues relating to constitutional law. Goal is to increase public awareness of the Constitution. Construction Law | Addresses issues concerning public and private contracting, mechanics’ liens and bonds, development, insurance and claims, construction defects, OSHA compliance and subcontracting. Corporate Counsel | Membership in the Corporate Counsel Section is limited to fulltime, in-house counsel and paralegals. Sponsors three regional luncheon meetings each year in the Triad, Charlotte and the Triangle, annual meeting with CLE designed for inhouse counsel, and less formal “no-speaker” networking lunches. Criminal Justice | Represents the interests of all lawyers who participate in the criminal justice system, whether defense attorney, prosecutor or member of the judiciary. Promotes civility, professionalism and the highest ethical standards in the practice of criminal law; serves as a vehicle for meaningful dialogue among prosecutors, the defense bar and the judiciary on topics of importance to criminal law. Dispute Resolution | Affiliate membership is open to non-lawyer mediators. Addresses issues that are relevant to both mediation and arbitration. Acts as a resource for practicing mediators and arbitrators as well as attorneys who utilize alternative dispute resolution processes in and related to courts as well as in the context of business transactional matters. Education Law | Promotes education of and networking among attorneys serving schools K-12 and colleges, administrators, employees, faculty and students. Broad coverage of legal perspectives including state and federal law and regulation, student issues, employment, board representation and other topics of interest to school systems, institutions of higher education, their personnel and students. Elder & Special Needs Law | Addresses such issues as care management and correct placement for disabled adults requiring long-term care; Medicaid and Special Assistance eligibility for nursing home and assisted living; Medicare claims and appeals; Veterans’ benefits; Medicaid estate recovery; private payment options such as long-term care insurance; special needs trusts; planning for families with disabled children; guardianship law; advance directives and end-of-life decision-making; and mental capacity issues. Environment, Energy & Natural Resources Law | Affiliate membership is offered to non-lawyer environmental professionals. Provides the only ongoing forum in the state for collegial interaction among all three sectors, boasting significant numbers of environmental lawyers (private, public and nonprofit). Estate Planning & Fiduciary Law | Addresses issues of interest to attorneys engaging in estate planning and trust and estate administration. Promotes public awareness of estate planning and administration issues and the role of attorneys in these fields. Family Law | The Family Law Section promotes improvements in family law practice and jurisprudence by legislative changes, legal education, practice guides, pro bono legal services and mentoring programs. It is a leader in CLE seminars, quality newsletters with case updates and articles for practitioners, and a List- Serve for practice aid and discussion. Best of all is a great party at the Family Section Annual Meeting. Participation is rewarding. Government & Public Sector | Promotes the interests and practice of law by attorneys and paralegals employed by local, state or federal government and by those in private practice who represent public agencies. Members include attorneys employed in executive/administrative agency as well as those serving in legislative and judicial positions.

Health Law | Addresses legal issues related to health care including health care regulation of individual and institutional providers, medical liability and health insurance. Co-publishes Prognosis newsletter with the N.C. Society of Health Care Attorneys. Insurance Law | Brings together NCBA members who have a primary interest to inform all lawyers interested in the field of insurance law of the current and significant developments in that area. Intellectual Property Law | Affiliate membership is offered to patent agents. Subject matter committees examine patent, trademark, copyright, trade secret, international IP, licensing, , and other areas of intellectual property. International Law & Practice | Affiliate membership in this section is open to nonlawyers active in the field. Serves as an educational, legislative and networking resource for practitioners engaged in cross border issues and international affairs. Plans and organizes both outbound and inbound attorney exchange delegations. Reviews current developments in political and trade-related entities, monitors state and federal laws and regulations and makes recommendations where appropriate. Juvenile Justice & Children’s Rights | Affiliate membership offered to non-lawyer professionals dealing with children’s rights issues. Provides networking with attorneys and advocacy organizations interested in protecting the rights of children in all areas of the law affecting children including domestic, juvenile court and education. Labor & Employment Law | Serves as an educational and networking resource for lawyers involved in a broad spectrum of employment law representation, also provides input on legislative and ethical matters affecting employers, employees, and counsel. Members include attorneys representing management, employees, and labor unions, plus representatives from various government entities and in-house counsel. Law Practice Management & Technology | Provides resources and business training for all aspects of individual and firm practice management including technology, marketing, HR and financial management for firms of all sizes. Affiliate membership is open to non-lawyer firm administrators and law librarians. Litigation | Includes those who have a substantial portion of their practice in civil litigation. The section takes the lead in addressing changes in the rules of civil procedure, the ethics rules and other statutes affecting civil litigation. The council, consisting of both plaintiff and defense attorneys, seeks to achieve a balanced approach to issues affecting litigation. Military & Veterans Law | Affiliate membership offered to non-lawyer professionals dealing with military and veterans issues. Brings together NCBA members and affiliates who have a special interest in military law or veteran-focused legal services. Serves as a coordinating body for NCBA activities and initiative impacting military and veterans. Real Property | Drafts, monitors and comments upon state and federal proposed legislation and regulations affecting real property practice; monitors and comments upon State Bar ethics inquiries; sponsors and participates in pro bono projects; provides variety of CLE programs; conducts aggressive consumer protection/authorized practice program; hosts active electronic discussion list; periodically updates and republishes forms book; and oversees NCBA copyrighted real property forms. Solo, Small Firm & General Practice | Serves the needs of small and solo firms and general practitioners, publishes General Practice Deskbook and Habitat for Humanity Forms Book. Sponsors a variety of initiatives designed to enhance one’s practice and promote professionalism. Sports & Entertainment | Includes lawyers who represent sports and entertainment clients, who serve as counsel to organizations engaged in the multi-billion dollars sports and entertainment industry and who wish to broaden their practices to include the sports and entertainment area. The section provides expertise to its members on the NHL, NFL, MLS, WUSA, Motor Sports, Olympic Sports, Professional Tennis and Golf, NCAA, Music, Film, Theater, Publishing and Television industries. Tax | Offers a wide variety of programs on tax issues and engages in tax policy, tax pro bono projects, and tax legislative projects (in each case, with a focus on North Carolina state and local tax issues). The section meets annually with the North Carolina Department of Revenue and IRS representatives located in North Carolina. Workers’ Compensation | Affiliate membership is offered to non-lawyer professionals who are involved in workers’ compensation law. Plaintiff and defense attorneys and the Industrial Commission are represented on the council and all perspectives are addressed in the newsletter. The section appoints a representative to meet periodically with the Industrial Commission to review issues of interest to members. Zoning, Planning & Land Use | Includes attorneys in private and local governmental practice who routinely handle matters related to land use, zoning, zoning litigation, and environmental regulations affecting the development of land. Affiliate membership is open to non-lawyers active in the field of zoning, planning and land use law.

®

Fastcase Quick Reference Guide | 2014

Locating a case by keyword

Sorting search results

To pull up a document by keyword, use Advanced Caselaw Search and formulate your search query using one or more of the 8 Boolean operators listed at the bottom of this sheet.

To sort your search results, click on any column heading on the Results page. For example, clicking on Decision Date will sort your results in chronological order.

Tip: Start with a broad search and use Fastcase’s sorting and filtering tools

Filtering cases by jurisdiction

to find the document you need. If you are not sure where to start, a natural language search may help point you in the right direction.

Locating a case by party name Try performing a keyword search using the following format: Plessy v. Ferguson. You can use Quick Caselaw Search or Advanced Caselaw Search. To pull up Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896), type Plessy v. Ferguson into the search box.

To filter your cases by jurisdiction, click the down arrow on the Jurisdiction Filter at the top left side of the screen, and select the jurisdiction you want from the drop down menu.

Generating a list of later citing cases To generate a list of cases that cite the case you are viewing, click the hyperlinked number under the Authority Check heading on the top left hand side of the screen.

Tip: This works best when parties have less common names.

Locating a case by citation Type in the volume number, reporter abbreviation, and first page number of the case. You can use Quick Caselaw Search or Advanced Caselaw Search. To pull up Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896), type 163 U.S. 537 into the search box.

An Authority Check Report with a list of later-citing cases will open in a new tab or window in your browser.

Browsing statutes in Outline View Start by selecting Search Statutes from the Search menu and then select the Browse tab. Select the code you want to browse by clicking on the plus sign to expand the view. Expand any section by clicking on the plus sign. To view the

Printing a document To print the document you are viewing, start by clicking the Print/Save link at top right hand side of the screen. When you get to the Print Document screen make your formatting selections (e.g., .pdf, .doc, .rtf ) and click Print/Save again. The document will begin downloading to your computer. Once the document has downloaded, you can open and print the document using the appropriate software program (e.g., MS Word, Adobe Acrobat, Word Perfect).

statute, click on the statute title.

Batch-print multiple cases Start by adding cases to your print queue, either by clicking on the Add to My Print Queue link when you are viewing a case, or by clicking the Print Queue icon from the results page. Next, select View Print Queue from the Print menu. On the next screen, review the cases on the list, make your formatting selections, and click Print/Save to begin downloading the document to your computer.

Boolean Search Operators Result

Syntax AND, &

Example copyright AND preemption

cases with both the words "copyright" and "preemption"

OR NOT

landlord OR lessor

cases with either the word "landlord" or "lessor"

chemical waste NOT management

cases with the words "chemical" and "waste" but not "management"

()

(security OR pledge) AND assignment

cases with either "security" or "pledge", and also the word "assignment"

“” w/2, /2

“felony murder”

cases containing the exact phrase "felony murder"

capital w/2 punishment

cases in which the word "capital" appears within 2 words of the word "punishment"

*

mitig*

wildcard - cases containing variations of the stem, such as "mitigate", "mitigated"

mari?uana

cases containing mari - any letter - uana

?

Want more information about Fastcase?

This one is easy—visit us online at www.fastcase.com anytime, or call 1-866-773-2782 from 8a-8p Eastern time M-F, excluding holidays.

Official Nomination Requirements North Carolina Bar Association Citizen Lawyer Award

Purpose of the Award: To recognize and thank lawyers who exemplify the ideals of a citizen lawyer; to recognize role models who inspire other lawyers. In addition to their legal work, lawyers throughout North Carolina serve their communities in numerous ways every day, including public service in appointed or elected positions, work with nonprofit charitable or political organizations, service in the military, and volunteering with youth sports programs or religious organizations.

Selection Criteria: A broad cross-section of citizen lawyers will be recognized at the NCBA Annual Meeting for their service and contributions as citizen lawyers. Nominations are encouraged for lawyers who work outside their law practice to help others. The lawyer’s service can be in a local community or on a statewide basis. Examples of service may include the following: – Military service – Elected or appointed service in local or state government – Service on boards of community agencies or nonprofit organizations – Involvement in public service projects, such as Habitat for Humanity, scouting or youth sports – Volunteer involvement with schools, faith-based programs, or other service-minded organizations

Please submit the following information about the Nominee: 1. Biographical Information, including: – Name – Firm name – Business address – Telephone/Email – Area(s) of practice 2. A description of the nominee’s public or community service activities.

3. Contact information of a person with whom the nominee works in his/her public or community service activity: – Name – Organization – Email 4. Contact information of person making nomination – Name – Organization – Email

{e - Citizen Lawyer Award Info..doc}

Please return this form and any supporting information by December 15 to: David Bohm | Citizen Lawyer Nominations P.O. Box 3688, Cary, NC 27519-3688 [email protected] Questions? Please contact Carole Oliver at 919-677-0561

{e - Citizen Lawyer Award Info..doc}

North Carolina Bar Association Foundation ENDOWMENT GRANT APPLICATION FORM P.O. Box 3688, Cary, NC 27519 • www.ncbar.org

Grant cycle for which funds are requested:



January 1 – June 30, 20_____

 July 1 – December 31, 20_____ Please indicate which of the following objectives and purposes of the Foundation most accurately describes your request for Endowment funding (check only one):

 To study, improve and facilitate the administration of justice;  To build respect for and understanding of the law;  To enhance the professional competence of lawyers;

 To support legally related community service projects;

or  To support the delivery of legal services to eligible indigent communities

Application Instructions and Deadlines: 1. Applications must be received by April 30 to be considered by the Endowment Committee in the spring, and by October 31 to be considered in the fall. 2. Applications (and attached documents) should be submitted in a single-sided format (no double-sided or front/back documents). 3. Applications, correspondence, etc., should be mailed to the attention of: Thomas M. Hull, Director of Development, N.C. Bar Association Foundation, P.O. Box 3688, Cary, NC 27519 4. When funding is requested for projects involving the printing and distribution of publications of any type (books, brochures, pamphlets, etc.), a sample or mock-up should accompany the application. 5. When a group submits more than one application for consideration within the same grant period, its group leader must submit a prioritized list of requests for each submission ranging from the most important to the least important. You will be contacted if additional information is needed, and notified of the status of your application after review by the NCBA Foundation Endowment Committee and approval by the NCBAF Board of Directors in June (Spring applicants) or January (Fall applicants).

1.

Name of Organization: _____________________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip: _____________________________________________________________________________________________

2.

Contact’s Name: __________________________________________________________________________________________ Title: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ E-mail: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone: ________________________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________

3.

Project Name: _____________________________________________________ 4. Grant Amount Requested: $_____________ (Form continues on next page)

(Continued from previous page) 5.

General Description of Project: _______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary.

6.

Purpose, Scope and Desirability of Project (include schedule of events, location and description of intended audience): ____________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary.

7.

Expected Completion Date of Project: _________________________________________________________________________

8.

Total Cost of Project: $____________________________________________________________________________________

9.

Describe how you will determine the success of this project (e.g. measurable outcomes, number of people served, etc.): ___________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary.

10. Other Funds Pledged or On Hand: SOURCE

AMOUNT

_________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary. 11. On a separate page, please submit a project line-item budget to include administrative costs, such as personnel, supplies, print and mailing expenses, etc., identifying anticipated expenses of the project. 12. If the Organization/Applicant has been accorded tax-exempt status, please submit the Federal I.D. number: _______________ Attach a copy of the determination letter from the Internal Revenue Service.

If granted funds by the Foundation, the undersigned, on behalf of the above-named organization, agrees to render faithful efforts to carry out the activities described in this application, and further agrees to furnish semi-annual status reports to the Foundation by April 30 and October 31 until the conclusion of the project. If necessary, you will need to request semi-annual grant extensions with your status reports. Authorized Signature: __________________________________________________________________________________________ Title: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Submitted: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ For additional information regarding eligibility for Endowment Funds, please contact: Director of Development • North Carolina Bar Association Foundation • P.O. Box 3688 • Cary, North Carolina 27519 or call the North Carolina Bar Center at (919) 677-0561 or 1 (800) 677-0761.

APPLICATION DEADLINES are APRIL 30 and OCTOBER 31.

NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION FOUNDATION ENDOWMENT GRANT APPLICATION FORM P. O. Box 3688, Cary, NC 27519 – www.ncbar.org ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Grant cycle for which funds are requested:

 January l - June 30, _____  July l - December 3l, _____

Please indicate which of the following objectives and purposes of the Foundation most accurately describes your request for Endowment funding:  To study, improve and facilitate the administration of justice;  To build respect for and understanding of the law;  To enhance the professional competence of lawyers;  To support the delivery of legal services to eligible indigent communities; or  To support legally-related community service projects.

1.

Name of Organization/Applicant: _____________________________________________________ Mailing Address: __________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip: ____________________________________________________________________

2.

Contact's Name: __________________________________________________________________ Title: ____________________________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________ E-mail Address: ___________________________________________________________________ Telephone Number: ________________________FAX Number: ___________________________

3.

Project Name: ________________________________4. Grant Amount Requested:____________

5.

General Description of Project: ______________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________

6.

Purpose, Scope & Desirability of Project (include schedule of events, location & description of intended audience): ________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ ____

7.

Expected Completion Date of Project: ________________________________________________

8.

Total Cost of Project: $_____________________________________________________________

9.

Describe how you will determine the success of this project: (e.g. measurable outcomes, number of people served, etc.):

________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary. 10.

Other Funds Pledged or On Hand: SOURCE

AMOUNT

____________________________________________

_________________________________

____________________________________________

________________________________

Attached additional pages if necessary

11.

On a separate page, please submit a line-item budget to include administrative costs, such as personnel, supplies, print and mailing expenses, etc., identifying anticipated expenses of the project.

12.

If the Organization/Applicant has been accorded tax-exempt status, please submit the Federal I.D. Number: _____________________. Attach a copy of the determination letter from the Internal Revenue Service.

If granted funds by the Foundation, the undersigned, on behalf of the above-named organization agrees to render faithful efforts to carry out the activities described in this application, and further agrees to furnish semiannual status reports to the Foundation by April 30 and October 3l until the conclusion of the project. If necessary, you will need to request semi-annual extensions with your status report. Authorized Signature: _________________________________________________________ Title: ______________________________________________________________________ Date Submitted: _____________________________________________________________ For additional information regarding eligibility for Endowment Funds, please contact the Director of Development - NC Bar Association Foundation - P.O. Box 3688 - Cary, NC 27519 or call the North Carolina Bar Center at (9l9) 677-056l or 1 (800) 662-7407 Application Deadlines are April 30 and October 3l

Chapter 4 Essential Go-To Resources for Bar Leaders David Daggett Josh McIntyre

2016 Bar Leadership Institute

“Go-To Resources for Bar Leaders”

by David D. Daggett Daggett Shuler, Attorneys At Law Winston-Salem, NC

2016 Go-To Resources for Bar Leaders Table of Contents 1.

PowerPoint Slides - Essential Go-To Resources for Bar Leaders

p. 1-38

2.

North Carolina State Bar - Web Staff and Department Directory

p. 39-40

3.

North Carolina State Bar - Frequently Asked Questions

p. 41-58

4.

Statutes Governing District Bar Activities

p. 59

5.

Rules and Regulations Governing District Bars

p. 60

6.

Essential Duties of District Bar Officers

p. 61

7.

Lawyer Assistance Program - Brochure/Report

p. 62-84

8.

ACAP - Complaints Against Lawyers - Brochure

p. 85-86

9.

Fee Dispute Resolution Program

p. 87-88

10.

ABA – Resources and Services

p. 89-98

11.

NCBA – Mentoring Programs

p. 99-110

12.

NCBA – Lawyer Referral Service Application

p. 111-112

13.

Centennial Award - Nomination Form/Certificate Example

p. 113-118

14.

Law-Related Education Information and Programs

p. 119

15.

Lunch with a Lawyer - Articles and Examples

p. 120-129

16.

BarCARES - FAQ Sheet, Services Summary, Forms

p. 130-138

17.

North Carolina Specialty Bars

p. 139-142

18.

Public Service Awards

p. 143-146

19.

N.C. Bar Foundation - Grant Information/Forms

p. 147-150

20.

NCBA - Composite List of Awards

p. 151-157

21.

Inns of Court - Article and Materials

p. 158-170

22.

District Court 50th Anniversary

p. 171-176

POWERPOINT SLIDES – GO-TO RESOURCES FOR BAR LEADERS Pages: 1-38

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Bar Leadership Institute

Go-To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Presented by:

DAVID D. DAGGETT of

“Go‐To Resources for  Bar Leaders”  Making Your Association  Valuable to Its Members  Mandatory, Local, and Specialty  Bars

What do you need?  • Resources available • Where to find them • Who to call

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

1

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Resources Available From...

• • • •

State Bar ABA NCBA and Specialty

Each Program Overview 

• Cover the basic point • What’s in it for your members • Contact Information

N.C. State Bar www.ncbar.gov 

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

2

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Direction of State Bar “The State Bar seeks to work closely  with the North Carolina Bar  Association to further the Programs  and Missions of both organizations.   We appreciate the work of all Local,  District, and Specialty bar leaders in  bettering the legal profession in North  Carolina.”   James R. Fox, President,  2011‐2012

Challanges • Authorized Practice of Law • Non‐Lawyer Ownership of Firms • Of course Ethics and Discipline, but a whole  lot more that can help you! • And, the new building serving our 24,000+  Lawyers . . . 

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

3

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Your District Responsibilities • Essential Duties • District Bar Checklist • Responsibilities and Obligations of  Governance of District Bars • See lists in handout • District Bar section on website • Contact....

Peter Bolac  North Carolina State Bar [email protected]  919‐828‐4620

Nichole P. McLaughlin Assistant Ethics Counsel District Bar Liaison North Carolina State Bar 919‐828‐4620, ext. 238

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

4

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Attorney Client Assistance Program    (ACAP) • Seeks to improve communications between   lawyers and clients by resolving minor  problems • Basically a mediation between lawyers and  clients • Attempts to resolve matters short of the  grievance process • In 2007  CAP became ACAP

ACAP ‐ 2015 stats (Hot off the Press!) • Total calls  11,167   *Lower calls attributed to better web info • Attorneys  Contacted    Approx 2,970   • Letters  from Inmates 2,224   • E‐mails Responded to Approx 881

Fee Disputes (Hot off the Press!) • Fee disputes filed • Handled through State Bar

530 424

– two State Bar mediators

• Sent to Local Districts(5 Districts)  108 – The numbers are down, due in part to the  economy and information that is available on the  website.

*Brochures in Materials

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

5

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Contact: Luella C. Crane, Director [email protected] Certified Mediator One Facilitator Three Public Liaisons 919-828-4620

Lawyer Assistance Programs PALS FRIENDS www.nclap.org

The North Carolina Lawyer Assistance Program is a safe, confidential and free program of assistance for all North Carolina lawyers, judges, and law students, which helps address problems of anxiety, stress, depression, alcoholism, addiction or other issues that may lead to impairing a lawyer’s ability to practice.

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

6

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

PALS – since 1979 (Positive Action for Lawyers) • For alcohol and other chemical addictions      • Discrete and confidential investigation to  determine if intervention is needed • Any NC Lawyer, their families, and colleagues • Confidential by rule of State Bar • Peer Volunteers

FRIENDS Assists lawyers suffering w/ depression or  other mental health disorders since 1999 1.  FRIENDS does initial interview to  determine the scope of the problem 2.  Connects the lawyer w/ proper medical  professional 3.  Confidential under State Bar rules

2015 Latest Stats/Updates: • Since 2000 more than 2,000 lawyers have been  assisted – Close to 10% of Bar • State now divided into 3 Districts Western, Piedmont, Eastern • Over 200 in volunteer network;  494 current  open files • 84% success rate for addiction and mental  health

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

7

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Good News! Increase in number of self referrals to PALS and  FRIENDS (over 50%)   Better understanding of programs  Increased confidence in  confidentiality  Greater awareness  Free CLE/Speaker Programs

Services are confidential and free and include: • In-office appointments to talk through your issues of concern • Referrals as needed to specialized health care providers • Lawyer discussion groups • On-going support

Robynn Moraites  Executive Director 704‐892‐5699 [email protected] Nicole Ellington Raleigh and Areas East 919‐719‐9267 [email protected]

Cathy Killian Charlotte and Areas West 704‐910‐2310 [email protected] Towanda Garner Piedmont Triad Area 919‐719‐9290 [email protected]

www.nclap.org

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

8

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Chief Justice’s Commission on  Professionalism • • • • •

Promote professionalism Historical video library Speaker Programs Mentoring programs  Yearly Professionalism Award

District Bar Professionalism  Programs  • • • • •

“Celebration of the Practice of Law” Chief Justice serves as the keynote speaker 2 free CLE hours and a free meal + 1 hour mental health/substance if requested CJCP and Lawyers Mutual and any other local  sponsors that would like to participate • Local speakers are featured and these have  been great programs – have done ALL districts

Professional Support Initiative  • PSI for short • Voluntary local lawyer and judge assistance  program  • Intervention for client‐lawyer, lawyer‐lawyer,  and lawyer‐judge issues  • Offers counsel and assistance to lawyers and  judges who receive repeated complaints at  the  State Bar, the Judicial Standards Commission,  etc • No reporting – statistical records only 

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

9

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Contact: Melvin F. Wright, Jr. [email protected] 919‐571‐4762

ABA www.americanbar.org

Division for Bar Services Roseanne T. Lucianek Division Director (312) 988‐5344 [email protected]  Molly Flood  Research & Information Manager  312‐988‐5362 [email protected]

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

10

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Division for Bar Services Resources • Link to more than 3000 state, local, minority,  women’s, and specialty Bar organizations • Information Clearinghouse                            ‐ activities, services, programs, events • Bar Leader ‐ magazine targeted to volunteer  and staff Bar leaders – NCBA frequently  featured!! www.americanbar.org/groups/bar_services    1‐312‐988‐5343

Field Services Program

• Personalized service to Bar leaders and staff • Onsite visits to organizations • Program and Management Assistance

Consulting Services • Mission Statement Development  (focus on purpose)

• Operational Survey (assess and make change)

• Strategic Planning (create its future)  www.americanbar.org/groups/bar_services/services/ consulting_service_program

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

11

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Contact... Karyn S. Linn Field Service Director 1‐312‐988‐5350 [email protected] www.americanbar.org/groups/bar_services /services/field_service_program

NCBA www.ncbar.org 

Initial Points of Emphasis • Public Service through Lawyer On The Line and 4ALL  Service Day ‐ 800+ Volunteers • NC Lawyer Referral Service (LRS) • Member Benefits:  – – – –

CLE Discounts Fastcase Health Benefit Trust Office and Travel Discounts and Social Events

• Sections (30) and Divisions (4) (19,500+) • Numerous committees, commissions and task forces 

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

12

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Website Info and Resources are  NUMEROUS!

So, ……… Josh McIntyre Dir. of Membership 

Check out our website

To log in to the site, click “Login”

#1 Center for Practice Management (CPM) Director Erik Mazzone offers free practice management advice for NCBA members – [email protected] or 1‐800‐662‐7407 • Erik can consult directly with firms or speak at local  bar events • Practice management advice on a wide variety of  topics including management, marketing,  technology…to name a few • Help with the bottom line – particularly useful given  this economic climate!

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

13

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Where to find the CPM Available to click on the left menu

Or, go directly to http://cpm.ncbar.org

#2 – Career Center

• A service to member and the public. • Use “YM Careers”  • Members get a 15% discount for posting  • Users can post resumes and get automatic  job listings emailed to them weekly. 

Select “Career Services” on the second green bar

Or, go directly to http://careercenter.ncbar.org/

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

14

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

#3 – Free Legal Research • Online Legal Research available  through Fastcase at NO extra charge to  members • Federal and North Carolina materials, as  well as all 50 states • Case law, statutes, attorney general  opinions and more

If already logged  into  the site, go to  Fastcase  on the green bar  and  choose “Start”  from the drop  down menu

Fastcase offers research capabilities and also  has mobile apps

Also available: case law and statutes  for all 50 states and a Federal library

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

15

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

#4 Sections and Divisions • 30 Sections and 4 Divisions

Available

click – Paralegal, Law School, YLD and SLD on to the top

green bar • Listserv access, discounted CLEs, social and  networking events, public service  opportunities, forms and newsletters • Over 70% of all paid NCBA memberships  are a member of at least 1 section 

Forms are available to members of the Real Property Section. You will need to log in before downloading one.

#5 BarCARES program provides basic coverage  for NCBA members

To find more information about the two-year pilot program, and the entire BarCARES program, click here

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

16

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

#6 Lawyer Referral Service • Public Benefit – Connects public to an 

Click on “NC Findattorney in the area for $50 for 30 min  a-Lawyer” onconsultation the Public – Can find an attorney online or by phone Service • page NCBA Members can join for $150/yr

• IntelLinx manages LRS system

Accept the attorney to see the referral!

NCBA members can use the online Membership  Directory to locate other members

• Choose from the  Membership drop down  menu on the main page. • You will need to be logged  in. • Many choices to search:  county, section membership,  committee membership,  firm…etc.

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

17

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

#7 Social Media Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Twitter

#8 Bar Foundation CLE

 Relevant, practical CLEs with NC attorney colleagues,  judges, and national speakers  Automatic CLE Credit reporting to the NC State Bar  Interactive CLEs with networking statewide  The CLE Passport program: Your Seasons Pass for CLE   Made to Order CLE for Bar Organizations  The Largest NC Specific Publications Collection  Available, With Online Library and e‐book options

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

18

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Our Online Learning Center

Browse our entire catalog of  courses and books (over 1000 options!) Take online courses, including live webcasts, on demand courses,  audiocasts and  webinars Download digital versions of your program materials for any program, including live  onsite programs.

Location, Quality, Flexibility

• • •

Top Rated Live Programs Statewide Interactive live webcasts, teleseminars, webinars and audioseminars from the comfort of  your computer On Demand, online CLEs anytime, from anywhere



Made to Order CLE:  You choose the topics and the location and we’ll come to you.

CLE Production Studio • Producing top quality webcast and  online CLE programs by NC lawyers and  paralegals, for NC lawyers and  paralegals • Professional production staff, anchor  desk,  and equipment to make your  program look great! High speed  streaming capability and slide  synchronization for speaker materials.   Ability to support live online Q&A with  attendees. • Welcoming proposals from all NC Bar  Leaders to present or participate in a  Webcast

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

19

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

#9 Health Benefit Trust More than 8,200 lawyers, their staff and families pool health benefit contributions to cover health care expenses.

#10 – Public Service / Pro Bono

The Public Service/ Pro  Bono web page offers  information on Local  Bar Services and NCBA  public service  programs. 

NCBA  advocates for all of us

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

20

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Contact: Josh McIntyre NCBA  Director of Membership  [email protected] 919‐657‐1552

The Solo, Small Firm and      General Practice Section  • The Solo and Small Firm Resource Center • Staff Training Videos • Resource Center Library ‐ 20% off ABA  Materials to NCBA members • “Quick Check” pamphlets on budgeting,  filing, client relations, and calendar basics • Lots of resources now in Center for Practice  Management   

Technology Assistance • Now under Center for Practice  Management  • Quality legal technology consulting • Reduced Costs • Even staff training

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

21

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Mentoring Programs • • • • •

Traditional and Situational Mentoring Surprisingly, we need more mentees Perfect for new licensees Free resource! Application online, info in materials Joyce Brafford Assistant Director  Center for Practice Management [email protected]

Centennial Award • Honors lawyers for community service • Positive publicity for all lawyers do in the  community • No cost for local Bars • Now for Specialty Bars too! • By Local Bar Services Com and NCBA Carole Oliver  [email protected] 1‐800‐662‐7407

Law‐Related Education • Previously “Lawyers in the Schools” • Depends on Volunteer lawyers serve as resource  to  schools – PLEASE register online • Provide information on the judicial system,  government, and the role of law as the preserver  of freedom • Assist in obtaining speakers from government, the  courts, lawyers, etc. • Serve as a conduit to NCBA divisions and  programs

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

22

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Law‐Related Education Department  • Former teacher Diane Wright is the Director  • Working full‐time to strengthen our programs  • Part of  “Momentum 2010” ‐ The NCBA   Strategic Plan  • “We The People” Program/Competition • PEOPLE, PROGRAMS and PUBLICATIONS www.ncbar.org/public‐resources/law‐education

"Lawyers for an  Educated Work Force" • New Task Force for 2013 • Local Bars work with local schools for  increased reading proficiency requirements by  third grade • Great service project

Contact: Diane R. Wright [email protected]  

Full LRE Advisory Committee 1‐800‐662‐7407  

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

23

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

“Lunch With A Lawyer” Program • Successful program and encourage other bar  leaders to implement. • Purpose: To give attorneys an opportunity to  develop a mentor relationship over a summer  with 14‐16 year olds from economically  challenged backgrounds who have an interest  in the legal profession.

Lunch With A Lawyer Program ‐ Getting started! • Minimal administrative burden • Overall benefits are plentiful • The Wake County Bar Association has successfully  conducted the program for 20 years, has more than  2000 alumni,  and serves as a model for others to  follow. Program participants stand ready to provide  guidance to get your county’s program up and  running. • News Article in Materials

Contact: Whitney von Haam [email protected] Wake County Bar www.wakecountybar.org  919‐677‐9903 

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

24

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

May We digress?

Swim, Bike, Run to Life Lessons

We’re Off!

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

25

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Anything is Possible!

We all need a little support.

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

26

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Bar Cares 1‐800‐640‐0735

BarCARES  Free Counseling/Career Assessment to Attorneys & their Families  Confidential/24-hours/day/ No-Hassle  By Top Professionals

1‐800‐640‐0735

The Problem A.  High incidence of psychological     difficulties  in our profession B.  Much higher than national average C.  Reluctance of attorneys to seek care 1.  Confidentiality 2.  Cost 3.  Competence of providers

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

27

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

1‐800‐640‐0735 THE  PROBLEM Survey* of all N.C. licensed attorneys shows: • 25+% show signs of clinical depression Contrast with 7% of all Americans (Mental Health:  A Report of the U.S. Surgeon General, p. 244, Dec.  1999) • 25% manifest signs of anxiety • 11% think about committing suicide at least twice a month *NCBA/NC State Bar 1990 and 1999 (NCBF)

TERRIBLE   COST Economic Loss of Attorney Productivity 

Malpractice



Loss of Investment in Attorney



Direct care cost - $100 Billion in US today (US Surgeon General, P. 412)



Indirect cost - cause of physical disease 1‐800‐640‐0735

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

28

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

HUMAN    COST Productive Life Span burdened by Disease Loss of Family / Friends/ Loved Ones / Quality of Life The Attorney’s Life 1-800-640-0735

INEFFECTIVE  PRIOR   APPROACHES • Wailing and gnashing of teeth • Peer counseling • Employee Assistance Programs

1-800-640-0735

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

29

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

WHY???     

Attorney pride Hassle Lack of confidentiality Expensive Lack of competence by providers 1-800-640-0735

A  MODEL  SOLUTION:             

BarCARES

1-800-640-0735

• Easy one step phone call ‐ no hassle or paperwork ‐ no run around • CONFIDENTIAL * ‐ not State Bar ‐ not the Firm ‐ not the Family ONLY the Provider * Chpt. 90 - N.C. General Statutes

• Highest level of  professionalism ‐ “custom‐made” ‐ Human Resource Consultants ‐ impressive clinical curricula vitae ‐ outstanding honors from peers ‐ great management • Free to user for first three visits ‐ then pay (or co‐pay) • And family 1-800-640-0735

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

30

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

The Provider Human Resource Consultants (HRC) (and its subcontractors) • Provider Locations:  Asheville, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Dare County,  Durham, Greensboro, Greenville, Fayetteville,  Mebane, Raleigh, Winston‐Salem, &  Wilmington  • In areas where there are no providers,  telephone consultation is available

SUCCESS OF BarCARES • 3 free visits per lawyer family (per year) • Confidential • Successful treatment / user satisfaction ‐ easy access ‐ effective professionals ‐ discrete ‐ knowledgeable ‐ they know attorneys 1-800-640-0735

Statewide Expansion‐ Service Options • Available to all local Bar member families *   who opt in  • Restricted Plan – allows use of mandatory  dues – Attorneys only • Fee‐For‐Service Plan ‐ Billed for service – amount capped ‐ Option to convert to “standard”  plan * Three free visits for any NCBA 

Member

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

31

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Tailored & Expansive BarCARES contracts with HRC to provide service for: – Central administrative fee paid by NCBA through   BarCARES – Per capita fee paid by local bars as they  “opt in” – 19 Judicial District and County Programs – 6 Law School Programs – Other Bar Groups • Judges • Courts • Paralegal Association

Fiscal Year 2000 2001 2002  2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008   2009 

2010  2011  2012  2013      2014 2015 TOTAL

Utilization 

Number of Referrals 73 74

Repeat Users 0 18

84 76   106 135  117 130 170 203 

18 21 27 42 41 27 45 70  

241 284 310 310 286 284 2109

92 96 132 155 156 160 10% of Bar

BarCares of NC, Inc. A.  Monitors statewide implementation B.  Independent Professionals assist in quality  control C. Confidentiality ‐ no tracking of names  ‐ no State Bar involvement! D. 6 minute video

1‐800‐640‐0735

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

32

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

THE CHALLENGE • Effective marketing • Strong Leadership at NCBA & local bars • Who’s next? Will we reach those in need? 1-800-640-0735

Contact: 1‐800‐640‐0735 www.ncbar.org/members/barcares Paige Barnett EAP Coordinator HRC Behavioral Health & Psychiatry,PA 100 Europa Drive, Suite 260 Chapel Hill, NC 27517  919‐929‐1227

1-800-640-0735

Transitioning Lawyers Commission • • • • • •

Nation Leading Efforts! Transitional Support Sale of a Practice Succession Planning Caregiver Resources Online Forms NCBA 1‐800‐662‐7407 Nan E. Hannah, Chair 919‐859‐6840

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

33

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Specialty Bars in NC • Many local and statewide Specialty Bars • Everyone has a place • Historically good representation at this  Conference • Many project ideas • Directory in materials

Pro Bono/Public Service • • • • •

Pro Bono Project and Awards Access to Justice – Legal Aid, etc Law Schools Lawyers in Public Service Lawyer Referral Service

Lawyer Referral Service • Over ___, 000 calls/intakes handled in 2015! • Great service to Public and Lawyers • Improvements in 2016! Kim Bart Mullikin Director of Public Service & Pro Bono Activities [email protected] 1‐800‐662‐7407

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

34

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

NCBA Foundation • Statewide Legal Services Grants • Grant awarded across NC for legally‐related  service projects • More than 550 grants totaling $4.3 million • Helped start BarCares • 40 ‐ 50 Grants Annually  (list in materials) • Scholarships • Volunteer Opportunities  

NCBA Foundation Service Projects Made possible by annual Patron Campaign • Lawyer Referral Service ‐ connected 70,000  people with a lawyer • Law‐Related Education in our Schools ‐ more  than 20,000 teachers & students involved • 4All Statewide Service Day (March 4, 2016)  nearly 10,000 caller provided legal  information • Lawyer on the Line ‐ short service legal aid  assistance by pro bono lawyers

Local Bar Foundations • Durham Bar Foundation ‐ 1‐2 law school scholarships • Greensboro Bar Foundation ‐ memorials in honor of its deceased members  ‐ supports community service projects in Greensboro,     such as Habitat for Humanity • Mecklenburg Bar Foundation ‐ summer law student fellowship  ‐ sponsor the Law & Society Luncheon  ‐ the Ayscue Professionalism Award presented • Wake County Bar Foundation ‐ awards 2‐3 law school scholarships every year. Contact: Tom Hull

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

35

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Give easily online at  www.ncbar.org/giving/donate‐ now/patron‐campaign/ Contact ‐ Tom Hull Director of Development  919‐657‐1567 [email protected]

Lake Family Public Service Award •

Began in 2005 as I. Beverly Lake, Sr.  Public  Service Award – Applications for 2017 due Feb 1, 2017 – Forms in your materials – Previous recipients have been involved with the Boy  Scouts, YMCA, medical clinics, local advocacy organizations  and the area's Boys and Girls Clubs – Contact: Kim Bart Mullikin Director of Public Service and Pro Bono Activities North Carolina Bar Association Foundation [email protected]         1‐800‐662‐7407 

Inns Of Court • • • •

Promote Professionalism Improve skills Instill ethics Brings together Judges, Lawyers (Masters    and Barristers), Students, and Law Professors • 382 Inns across the country (also including  Guam and Tokyo, Japan), 30,000 active  members, and 104,00 Alumni members • See article and brochure in materials

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

36

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Contact: www.innsofcourt.org Pam Wittmann Director of Chapter Relations American Inns of Court 1‐ (703) 684‐3590 [email protected] 

District Court 50th Anniversary  • Awareness of the 50th anniversary of District  Court and creation of the unified court system • Encourage local bar leaders and court officials  to plan some sort of educational or  celebratory event  • Kicks off a series of court celebrations  – 50th anniversary of the N.C. Court of Appeals in  2017  – 200th anniversary of the N.C. Supreme Court in  2019.

District Court 50th Anniversary  www.CelebrateNCCourts.org Contact: Robert B Rader Chief District Court Judge Tenth Judicial District (919) 792‐4800    (office) (919) 792‐4817    (direct) [email protected]

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

37

Essential Go‐To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

In Conclusion, for the coming year: • • •

Use the resources available to you Guide lawyers in your area to resources    available  Call on those who can offer insight and  guidance ...we are all in this together!

Thank You!!!

Bar Leadership Institute

Go-To Resources for Bar Leaders

May 13, 2016

Presented by:

DAVID D. DAGGETT of

Bar Leadership Institute 2016

38

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BAR – WEB STAFF AND DEPARTMENT DIRECTORY Pages: 39-40

North Carolina State Bar Staff and Department Directory (From Web Site) CONTACT THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE BAR North Carolina State Bar 217 East Edenton Street Raleigh, NC 27601 Get Directions Tel: (919) 828-4620 Fax: (919) 828-4621 Email: [email protected] The North Carolina State Bar is located in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina, on E. Edenton Street, near the appellate court houses and other state government buildings. Our offices are open from 9:00 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The North Carolina State Bar observes all State and Federal Holidays

39

Website Feedback: [email protected] Technical Support: [email protected] (Drop menus with all State Bar contacts below) Frequently Requested Numbers Staff Listing for the Public Staff Listing for Lawyers State Bar Leadership

40

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BAR – FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Page: 41-58

North Carolina State Bar – Frequently Asked Questions New expand web resources!! **There is a specific section for District Bar FAQs (From Web Site) Select an FAQ Category: Admission to the North Carolina State Bar Q: How can I become a member to the North Carolina State Bar? Admission - Swearing In Q: I just received my letter from the Board of Law Examiners (BOLE), notifying me that I have passed the Bar exam. What must I do before I begin practicing law? Q: What documents must I take to the admission ceremony? Q: How do I obtain an oath of office form? Q: Where should I file the oath of office forms after being sworn in? Q: When can I get sworn in? Q: Do I have to bring a North Carolina attorney with me to introduce me to the court at the admissions ceremony? Q: How soon after being admitted must I get sworn in? Q: If I wait to get sworn in will I still have to pay the annual membership fees to the North Carolina State Bar? Q: May I be sworn in by telephone?

41

Q: Can I get admitted to practice in the federal courts before I get sworn in to practice in the North Carolina state courts?

Client Security Fund Q: What is the Client Security Fund? Q: Where are the rules governing the administration of the Client Security Fund? Q: Is a lawyer required to pay the Client Security Fund Assessment to maintain his or her active status with the State Bar? Q: What losses are reimbursable? Q: What losses are not reimbursable? Q: How much is reimbursed? Q: Does the Client Security Fund Board pay all claims in full? Q: Are there dollar limits on reimbursements? Q: How are applications processed?

Closing a Law Practice 1. Complete and close as many files as possible. 2. Write to any client with an active file, advising them that you are unable to continue representing them and that they need to retain new counsel. Your letter should inform them about time limitations and time frames important to their case. The letter should explain 42

how and where they can pick up their file and should give a time deadline for doing this. If possible, refer the client to another lawyer who may be able to handle the client’s case.

3. For any case that has a scheduled court date, deposition, or hearing, discuss with the client how to proceed. Where appropriate, request extensions, continuances, and resetting of hearing dates. Send written confirmations of these extensions, continuances, and resets to opposing counsel and to your client. 4. For any case before an administrative body or court, obtain the client's permission to submit a motion and order to withdraw as attorney of record. 5. For any court case where the client has chosen a new attorney, be certain that a Substitution of Counsel is filed. 6. Pick an appropriate date and check to see if all cases have a Motion and Order allowing your withdrawal as attorney of record or have a Substation of Attorney filed with the court. 7. Each client should either pick up their file (and sign a receipt acknowledging that they received them) or sign an authorization for you to release the file to their new attorney. Consider whether you should make and retain copies of file documents before releasing the file to your client or your client’s new counsel. You may not charge the client for your copy of the file. You are not required to give the client your notes or your incomplete work product.

43

8. Each client should be told where their closed file will be stored and who they should contact in order to retrieve the file. If a closed file is to be stored by another attorney, get the client's permission to allow the attorney to store the file for you and provide the client with the attorney's name, address, and phone number. Closed files may be destroyed without client consent if they have been closed for six years or more. (Check with your insurance carrier as they often have different retention requirements.) You should make a list of the files that you destroy and, of course, the method of destruction should protect client confidences. If a file has been closed for less than six years, you may only destroy it with the consent of the client. Originals of wills, powers of attorney, etc. may not be destroyed. They must be kept indefinitely, turned over to the client, or turned over to the court. See RPC 209 (Disposing of Closed Client Files). 9. Determine disposal options for computer equipment. Scrub computers of software, and firm and client information. 10. If you are a sole practitioner, ask the telephone company for your new phone number to be given out when your old number is called. This eliminates the problem created when a client calls your phone number, gets a recording stating that the number is disconnected, and does not know where else to turn for information. If you do not want calls forwarded to your home or new office, set up an answering machine. 11. Disburse funds held in your trust account to the clients to whom they belong with a final accounting. You can also deliver the funds to new legal counsel designated by a client. Close out your account. For

44

questions concerning closing your trust account you may contact the State Bar at 919-828-4620. 12. Call the membership department at the North Carolina State Bar and update all membership records as to status and contact information. You may contact the membership department at 919828-4620. 13. If you wish to obtain inactive status, you must complete a petition to be placed on inactive status. These petitions can be found on the Forms page of the NC State Bar website. The petition must be completed and received no later than December 30th in order to avoid fees for the next year. All petitions for inactive status are heard at the State Bar’s quarterly meetings. If you have questions you may contact the membership department at 919-828-4620. 14. Contact your malpractice carrier about necessary continued malpractice coverage. Relevant Opinions RPC 209 (Disposing of Closed Client Files) RPC 234 (Electronic Storage of Client’s File) RPC 133 (Recycling/shredding Office Paper) RPC 178 (Release of Client’s File) Also, please refer to this ethics article from the Journal.

45

Continuing Legal Education (CLE) For information on continuing legal education, please visit the CLE website. Cy Pres/Class Action Residuals, Court Awards and Settlements For information, please visit the IOLTA website.

District Bars For more information on District Bars, visit the District Bar page. Q: Am I required to be a member of a local district bar? Q: What if I reside and practice in two different judicial districts? Q: Can I be a voting member of more than one judicial district bar? Q: What if I do not reside or maintain an office in North Carolina? Q: Are judicial district bar dues mandatory? Q: What if I join a different district after paying the district bar dues? Q: What judicial district bar do I belong to? Q: Where are the rules governing the administration of judicial district bars? Q: Who are the officers of my judicial district bar? Q: Who is the councilor(s) of my judicial district bar? Q: What is the role of the judicial district bar and its officers?

46

Ethics For further explanation of legal ethics, please see How the State Bar Rules on Questions of Legal Ethics Q: How do I get a question of legal ethics answered? Q: If I get an opinion over the phone from a State Bar staff lawyer, may I rely upon the advice I receive? Is the opinion binding on the State Bar? Q: If I seek ethics advice, either over the telephone or via email, is the information provided and the advice received confidential? Q: When is an ethics question sent to the full Ethics Committee for a response? Q: Were do I find the rules for the procedures of the Ethics Committee for ruling on questions of legal ethics? Q: How do I comment on a proposed ethics opinion published in the State Bar Journal or on this website? Q: May I attend a meeting of the Ethics Committee? If so, may I comment on an ethics inquiry or a proposed opinion? Q: If I send a written inquiry to the Ethics Committee, will it be kept confidential? Q: Are there any limitations on the types of ethics inquiries that I may submit to the Bar?

47

Q: Are the formal ethics opinions of the State Bar binding upon the members of the North Carolina State Bar? Q: When does a proposed ethics opinion become a final opinion of the State Bar Council?

Fee Dispute Resolution Q: When is a lawyer required to participate in the State Bar's fee dispute resolution program? Q: When is a legal fee in "dispute?" Q: What are the notification requirements to a client relative to the fee dispute resolution program prior to initiating suit to collect a legal fee? Q: May a lawyer notify a client of the fee dispute resolution program even though she does not intend to sue the client to collect the fee? Grievance Q: Where do I find the rules governing procedures of the State Bar's Grievance Committee and of the Disciplinary Hearing Commission? Q: Where do I find the rules governing the procedures of local grievance committees? Q: If I get a letter of notice that a grievance has been filed against me, can I get more time to respond?

48

Q: I just received notice that a grievance has been filed against me with the State Bar. Who can I talk to about the complaint? Q: If I get a letter of notice of a grievance, does it mean that the State Bar believes everything that the complainant said about me? Q: Do I need a lawyer to prepare my response to a grievance? Q: As a part of my defense against a grievance, may I testify before the Grievance Committee? Q: Why do I have to answer this letter of notice that a grievance has been filed against me? Q: How long will it take the Grievance Committee to rule on a grievance? Q: Why are some grievances sent to judicial district grievance committees for investigation and not others? Q: If I am required by Rule 8.3 of the Rules of Professional Conduct to report another lawyer for a possible violation of the Rules, will the accused lawyer be told that I made the repost? Q: Can I be disciplined for violation of a formal ethics opinion of the State Bar?

IOLTA For information on the IOLTA Program, please visit their website. Lawyer Assistance Program Click here for information concerning the Lawyer Assistance Program. 49

Legal Malpractice Insurance Q: What information is available about a North Carolina lawyer's legal malpractice insurance coverage?

Membership 1: Where do I find the rules relating to membership in the North Carolina State Bar? 2: Is membership in the North Carolina State Bar mandatory? 3: What am I required to do to remain an active member of the North Carolina State Bar? 4: How much are the mandatory annual membership fees? 5: When are the mandatory annual membership fees due? 6: What if I do not pay the membership fees by June 30? 7: What is the Client Security Fund assessment? 8: Once I am licensed by the NC Board of Law Examiners by passing the examination when will I become a member of the North Carolina State Bar and owe membership fees for the first time? 9: Once I am licensed by the NC Board of Law Examiners by comity when will I become a member of the North Carolina State Bar and owe membership fees for the first time?

50

10: Once I receive my license from the North Carolina Board of Law Examiners when will I receive my North Carolina State Bar ID number? 11: If I obtain an exemption from the continuing legal education requirements, am I also exempt from the obligation to pay the North Carolina State Bar membership fees? 12: If I am an active member of the North Carolina State Bar but I do not practice North Carolina law, what should I do to be relieved of membership fees and CLE obligations? 13: How do I retire or resign from the North Carolina State Bar? 14: I have been certified as a specialist by the NC State Bar Board of Legal Specialization. If I change my membership status to inactive, will I lose my specialty certification? 15: May I still hold myself out as a board certified specialist if I change my membership status to inactive? 16: Is there a fee for becoming an inactive member of the North Carolina State Bar? 17: How do I return to active membership in the North Carolina State Bar after being granted inactive status or from an administrative suspension? 18: Am I required to be a member of a local district bar? 19: How do I obtain a certificate of good standing? 20: How do I obtain a disciplinary history letter? 21: How do I obtain a copy of my bar application?

51

22: How do I obtain a new State Bar ID card? 23: How do I change my name in the North Carolina State Bar records? 24: I am getting married. I developed my professional reputation under my maiden name and wish to continue to use it professionally. If I change my surname to my spouse’s surname on my driver’s license, Social Security card, and other personal identifiers, may I continue to practice law under my maiden name? 25: If I decide to practice under my maiden name, what name should I list with the membership records of the State Bar? 26: What information should I provide to the State Bar if I change my legal name but wish to continue to practice under my maiden name? 27: How do I change my address, telephone, fax, and email contact information in the North Carolina State Bar records?

Professional Organizations Q: Where do I find the rules of the North Carolina State Bar relating to professional organizations? Q: What professional organizations are required to register with the State Bar? Q: How do I register a professional organization with the State Bar? Q: After a professional organization is registered with the State Bar, how is the registration maintained?

52

Q: Where do I find the rules of the State Bar for interstate and international law firms? Q: Are all interstate and international law firms required to register with the North Carolina State Bar? Q: How do I register an interstate or international law firm with the State Bar? Q: After an interstate or international law firm is registered with the State Bar, how is the registration maintained? Q: May I operate a law firm under a trade name?

Pro Hac Vice 1: Where do I find the rules of the North Carolina State Bar relating to pro hac vice registration requirements? 2: Which North Carolina General Statute sets forth the requirements for pro hac vice admission in North Carolina? 3: Who is required to file a registration form? 4: When must the sponsoring North Carolina lawyer file a registration form? 5: Can the North Carolina State Bar help me find a lawyer to serve as resident North Carolina counsel in the motion for limited admission as required by G.S. 84-4.1(5) and to also file the registration statement with the State Bar?

53

6: Where can I find a copy of the required registration form? 7: What must be included with the registration form? 8: What is a statement of tax reporting? 9: How do I pay the fees associated with a pro hac vice motion? 10: Do I need to notify the State Bar when the case concludes? 11: Is registration required for pro hac vice admission to a federal court? 12: Is there a rule governing limited practice of out-of state attorneys at the appellate level? 13: If already admitted pro hac vice at the trial court level, is registration required in conjunction with pro hac vice admission in a case in the NC Court of Appeals? 14: If not already admitted pro hac vice at the trial court level, is registration required in conjunction with pro hac vice admission in a case before the NC Court of Appeals? 15: If already admitted pro hac vice by the NC Court of Appeals, does the registration have to be updated if the case is appealed to the North Carolina Supreme Court? 16: If not already admitted pro hac vice at the trial court level or by the North Carolina Court of Appeals, is registration required in conjunction with pro hac vice admission in a case before the North Carolina Supreme Court? 17: May a lawyer licensed to practice in another state but not in North Carolina provide legal services free of charge to indigent persons? 54

18: Does an out-of-state lawyer have to be admitted PHV to take a deposition in North Carolina for a case that is filed in a state where the lawyer is licensed? 19: Is the sponsoring North Carolina lawyer (who provides the statement required by G.S. 84-4.1(5)) required to be present, with the out-of-state lawyer admitted pro hac vice, at all court proceedings including depositions? 20: What steps need to be taken if the North Carolina sponsoring lawyer wishes to withdraw from a case? 21: What steps need to be taken if the out-of-state lawyer wishes to withdraw from a case?

Publications (Ordering the Lawyer's Handbook and Journal) Q: How do I purchase a copy of the Lawyer's Handbook? Q: How often is the Lawyer's Handbook published? Q: What is contained in the Lawyer's Handbook? Q: How do I subscribe to the North Carolina State Bar Journal? Q: How often is the Journal published? Q: What if I want to subscribe to the Journal mid-year? Q: How much does it cost to purchase an individual copy of the Journal?

55

Retirement Q: What must I do if I intend to cease the practice of law and would like to be relieved of the dues and CLE requirements of membership in the North Carolina State Bar? Q: How to petition for inactive status Q: What fees must be paid before becoming an inactive member of the North Carolina State Bar? Q: When does the annual CLE credit hour requirement end for a person taking inactive status? Q: I have been certified as a specialist by the NC State Bar Board of Legal Specialization. If I change my membership status to inactive, will I lose my specialty certification? Q: What is the effect of taking inactive status? Q: How may I provide pro bono legal services after taking inactive status? Q: How do I close/end my law practice?

Specialization For information on specialization, please visit the Specialization website.

56

Trust Accounting View Trust Accounting Questions and Answers View the Trust Account Handbook

Unauthorized Practice of Law Review Guidelines for Attorneys Licensed in Other Jurisdictions but Seeking to Work in North Carolina Q: What is the practice of law? Q: Who may practice law in North Carolina? Q: May a nonlawyer perform acts constituting the practice of law for him or herself? Q: May a nonlawyer do legal work for a relative, friend, or another person, if the non-lawyer does not charge any money or fees for such work? Q: May a nonlawyer assist or represent another person in negotiations or settlement discussions on a legal claim, such as an automobile or personal injury matter? Q: May a paralegal assist or represent another person or provide legal services directly to the public? Q: May a corporation (including nonprofit corporations) provide legal representation to third parties? Q: May a nonlawyer do legal work for a corporation?

57

Q: May a lawyer licensed in another state practice law in North Carolina? Q: May nonlawyers sell or distribute standard legal kits, forms, or books to the public? Q: How are the prohibitions on the unauthorized practice of law enforced? Q: How does the State Bar process complaints relative to the unauthorized practice of law? Q: How do I file an unauthorized practice of law complaint with the State Bar? Q: What do I include with an unauthorized practice of law complaint? Q: When is a decision on a complaint likely to be rendered? Q: May I attend a meeting of the Authorized Practice Committee? Q: Who should I contact at the State Bar to discuss matters relating to the unauthorized practice of law?

58

STATUTES GOVERNING DISTRICT BAR ACTIVITIES Page: 59

Statutes Governing District Bar Activities

G.S. 7A-142

Recommendation of candidates to fill district court judge vacancy

G.S. 84-16

Membership and privileges (election of membership in district where lawyer resides or where lawyer works; written notice to secretary of North Carolina State Bar

G.S. 84-17, G.S. 84-18

Election of State Bar Councilor(s)

G.S. 84-18.1

Membership and fees of district bars

G.S. 84-19

Judicial districts definition

G.S. 132-1

Public records defined

G.S. 132-1.1

Confidential communications by legal counsel

G.S. 132-1.2

Confidential information

G.S. 143-318.11

Meetings of public bodies, closed sessions

59

RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING DISTRICT BARS Page: 60

Rules and Regulations Governing District Bars 27 N.C. Admin. Code, Subchapters 1A-1D

1A, .0800, et seq.

Election and Appointment of State Bar Councilors

1A, .0900, et seq.

Organization of the Judicial District Bars – District bars must adopt bylaws and submit bylaws to the State Bar Council for approval

1A, .1000, et seq.

Model Bylaws

1B, .0200, et seq.

Rules Governing Judicial District Grievance Committees (Any district with more than 100 licensed attorneys may establish a judicial district grievance committee.)

1D, .0700 et seq.

Fee Dispute Resolution

60

ESSENTIAL DUTIES OF DISTRICT BAR OFFICERS Page: 61

Essential Duties of District Bar Officers • • • • •

Correspond with your district bar councilor(s) to advise of the district bar’s position on recent actions proposed by the State Bar Council Review district bar bylaws, governing statutes, and governing rules and regulations (see attached governing statutes and rules and regulations) Make sure a current copy of the district bar bylaws is on file with the executive director of the State Bar and with the office of the resident superior court judge for your district Provide the names and addresses of all officers and members of the Board of Directors (if the bylaws provide for a BOD) to the executive director of the State Bar Call and schedule annual and special meetings for purposes of: -Electing district bar officers -Electing State Bar Councilor(s), upon notification from State Bar that a councilor’s term has expired -Choosing candidates for submission to the Governor in filling district court judge vacancies -Any other official business of the district bar as may come up from time to time, such as amendments of bylaws, imposition of or increase in dues, and other matters requiring formal action by the active members of the bar -Any other activities of the district bar, such as CLE, programs/speakers, and volunteer activities/outreach projects undertaken by the district bar

• • • • • • • •

Appoint board of directors and committee members, as required by bylaws Oversee committee responsibilities, including functions of the fee dispute resolution committee and local grievance committee (if any) Update roster of district bar membership annually, as requested by State Bar (with assistance of the secretary/treasurer) Assist State Bar in locating attorneys to serve as law practice trustees in the event of the death, disability, or disbarment of an attorney who has no partners or associates capable of winding down his or her law practice Oversee collection of district bar dues by secretary/treasurer (if any are imposed) Report to State Bar any judicial district bar member who is 12 months or more in arrears in payment of district bar dues Oversee expenditures of district bar dues to ensure proper uses of dues Make sure that the district bar provides an annual financial report to the executive director of the State Bar

61

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM BROCHURE/REPORT Pages: 62-84

An Important Free Resource for Lawyers One of the free resources available to you as a State Bar member is the Lawyer Assistance Program (LAP). From time to time, lawyers encounter a personal issue that, left unaddressed, could impair his or her ability to practice law. Accordingly, the LAP was created by lawyers for lawyers to assure that free, confidential assistance is available for any problem or issue that is impairing or might lead to impairment.

Lawyers at Particular Risk Of all professionals, lawyers are at the greatest risk for anxiety, depression, alcoholism, drug addiction, and even suicide. As many as one in four lawyers are affected. This means it is likely that you, an associate, a partner, or one of your best lawyer friends will encounter one of these issues. Whether you need to call the LAP for yourself or to refer a colleague, all communications are completely confidential.

Anxiety and Depression Anxiety and depression often go hand-inhand. These conditions can be incapacitating and can develop so gradually that a lawyer is often unaware of the cumulative effect on his or her mood, habits, and lifestyle. Each condition is highly treatable, especially in the early stages. Asking for help, however, runs counter to our legal training and instincts. Most lawyers enter the profession to help others and believe they themselves should not need help.

The good news is that all it takes is a phone call. The LAP works with lawyers exclusively. The LAP has been a trusted resource for thousands of lawyers in overcoming these conditions.

Alcohol and Other Substances Often a lawyer will get depressed and selfmedicate the depression with alcohol. Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant but acts like a stimulant in the first hour or two of consumption. The worse you feel, the more you drink initially to feel better, but the more you drink, the worse you feel. A vicious cycle begins. On the other hand, many alcoholic lawyers who have not had depression report that their drinking started normally at social events and increased slowly over time. There is no perfect picture of the alcoholic or addicted lawyer. It may be surprising to learn that he or she probably graduated in the top one-third of the class. Also surprising, lawyers may find themselves in trouble with addiction due to the overuse or misuse of certain prescription medications that were originally prescribed to address a temporary condition. Use of these kinds of medications, combined with moderate amounts of alcohol, greatly increases the chances of severe impairment requiring treatment. The LAP knows the best treatment options available, guides lawyers through this entire process, and provides ongoing support at every stage.

LAP recognizes alcoholism, addiction, and mental illness as diseases, not moral failures. The only stigma attached to these illnesses is the refusal to seek or accept help.

Confidentiality All communications with the LAP are strictly confidential and subject to the attorney-client privilege. If you call to seek help for yourself, your inquiry is confidential. If you call as the spouse, child, law partner, or friend of a lawyer whom you suspect may need help, your communication is also treated confidentially and is never relayed without your permission to the lawyer for whom you are seeking help. The LAP has a committee of trained lawyer volunteers who have personally overcome these issues and are committed to helping other lawyers overcome them. If you call a LAP volunteer, your communication is also treated as confidential. The LAP is completely separate from the disciplinary arm of the State Bar. If you disclose to LAP staff or to a LAP volunteer any misconduct or ethical violations, it is confidential and cannot be disclosed. See Rules 1.6(c) and 8.3(c) of the Rules of Professional Conduct and 2001 FEO 5. The LAP works because it provides an opportunity for a lawyer to get safe, free, confidential help before the consequences of any impairment become irreversible.

www.NCLAP.org

FREE

l

SAFE

l

CONFIDENTIAL

[email protected]

62

Know the signs. Make the call. You could save a colleague’s life.

TAKE THE TEST FOR DEPRESSION

TAKE THE TEST FOR ALCOHOLISM

YES NO

YES NO

q q

1. Do you feel a deep sense of depression, sadness, or hopelessness most of the day?

q q

1. Do you get to work late or leave early due to drinking?

q q

2. Have you experienced diminished interest in most or all activities?

2. Is drinking disturbing your home life?

q q

3. Have you experienced significant appetite or weight change when not dieting?

q q q q

q q

4. Have you experienced a significant change in sleeping patterns?

q q

5. Do you feel unusually restless...or unusually sluggish?

q q q q

6. Do you feel unduly fatigued? 7. Do you experience persistent feelings of hopelessness or inappropriate feelings of guilt?

q q

8. Have you experienced a diminished ability to think or concentrate?

q q

9. Do you have recurrent thoughts of death or suicide?

SAFE

q q

5. Have you gotten into financial difficulties as a result of drinking?

q q

6. Does drinking make you neglect your family or family activities?

q q q q q q

7. Has your ambition decreased since drinking?

q q

Adapted from American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Fourth Edition. Washington, DC. American Psychiatric Association: 1994.

l

4. Do you wonder if drinking is affecting your reputation?

q q q q

Other explanations for these symptoms may need to be considered. Call the Lawyer Assistance Program.

FREE

q q

q q q q q q

If you answer yes to five or more of these questions (including questions #1 or #2), and if the symptoms described have been present nearly every day for two weeks or more, you should consider speaking to a health care professional about treatment options for depression.

3. Do you drink because you are shy with other people?

8. Do you often drink alone? 9. Does drinking determine the people you tend to be with? 10. Do you want a drink at a certain time of day? 11. Do you want a drink the next morning? 12. Does drinking cause you to have difficulty sleeping? 13. Do you drink to build up your confidence? 14. Have you ever been to a hospital or institution because of drinking? 15. Do family or friends ever question the amount you drink?

If your answer is yes to two or more of these questions you may have a problem. Call the Lawyer Assistance Program.

l

CONFIDENTIAL

Western Region

Piedmont Region

Eastern Region

Cathy Killian 704.910.2310

Towanda Garner 919.719.9290

Nicole Ellington 919.719.9267

63

NC LAP Annual Report August 1, 2014 - July 31, 2015

 Protecting the public by insuring the health and integrity of the legal profession.

64

Message from the Executive Director

The Lawyer Assistance Program (“LAP”) has had a busy year. We welcomed Nicole “Nicki” Ellington to our staff in October of 2014 to serve as our Eastern Region Clinical Coordinator. Nicki has been a counselor since 2005. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and Licensed Clinical Addictions Specialist (LCAS). Nicki received her MA in Counseling at Marymount University in Arlington, VA and her BA in Psychology at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, NH. She has served a variety of populations including adults and adolescents, couples, families, and active duty service members. She has helped clients suffering from both substance abuse and a range of mental health disorders in intensive in-home counseling, out-patient substance abuse and mental health counseling, out-patient counseling for the United States Army (specializing in working with elite forces) and working in private practice. Upon joining LAP, she hit the ground running. She has traveled the eastern region and gotten to know our clients and volunteers across the region. She began facilitating the support groups in her area and has been a quick study on State Bar rules and procedures. We are delighted to have such a competent and dedicated counselor as a new addition to our already stellar team. LAP has furthered the initiatives begun in previous years. Sidebar, our quarterly e-newsletter, continues to receive positive reviews and to grow its subscriber base. The LAP Minority Outreach Conference, held in February in Chapel Hill, remains one of our most popular offerings and consistently fills to capacity. LAP remains the official provider of the work-life balance CLE credit hour as part of the mandatory, state-wide Professionalism for New Admittees (“PNA”) program. LAP’s collaborative partnership with the NC Bar Association’s Transitioning Lawyer Commission (“TLC”) (for older lawyers needing to transition out of practice) continues as well. The LAP recommended, and the State Bar Council granted, a 5year extension of the TLC’s status as a lawyer assistance program. The TLC and LAP will continue to cross refer and work together on cases involving lawyers who need to transition out of practice in a supportive way. LAP has also developed a speakers’ bureau comprised of volunteers across the state who have been trained to give certain high-demand CLE programs. As part of that effort, we had an additional 25 LAP volunteers attend training to be specialized

Continued on next page…. 65

Message from the Executive Director

PAGE 2

Continued... speakers for the presentation entitled, “Getting Lost in Our Own Lives.” This program is a general CLE program that is always in demand and has been adapted for use at PNA programs. With this training, our LAP presentation and information is consistent across presentations, and we reached every newly admitted lawyer in NC in the 20142015 admissions year. We currently have 43 volunteer speakers as part of this newly created CLE speakers’ bureau in addition to the 100 or so volunteers who currently present personal recovery stories at CLE presentations across the state. In terms of our client base, the ratio of addiction to mental health cases remains fairly consistent. And as a continuing trend, we are seeing more complex cases with multiple, serious issues occurring in the same individual. Alcoholism and depression remain by far the two most prevalent issues with which lawyers struggle. The data this year remains consistent with the trends we have seen over the past few years. The percentage of lawyers who refer themselves to our program remains very high (52% this year), an indicator that our CLE and outreach efforts are indeed effective. As we have seen over and over again in the 36 years since our inception, lawyers who reach out to our program and follow our suggestions become the most emotionally resilient, happiest and balanced lawyers in the state. We at LAP have been fortunate to witness countless lives transformed as well as the resulting community and fellowship that has emerged out of this shared journey of personal transformation. Amazing things are possible when one lawyer shares experience, strength and hope with another. For this reason, our outreach efforts will always remain a top priority. Robynn E. Moraites

66

PAGE 3

Lawyer Assistance Program Overview

History of NC LAP

Today both programs have been merged into a single Lawyer Assistance Program. NC LAP currently has a staff consisting of a director, three clinicians and 2 office administration and special projects personnel. NC LAP has a Board consisting of three State Bar Councilors, three LAP volunteers, and three clinicians or experts in the field of mental health and addiction. NC LAP also has a steering committee of volunteers from around the state who assist in the execution of special initiatives. NC LAP is also part of the ABA’s Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs (CoLAP), a network of LAPs serving nearly all 50 states in the U.S.

LAP Services 

Assessment



Referral



Case Management



Peer Support



Intervention



Facilitated Support Groups



Educational Programs

Mission of NC LAP NC LAP is a service of the North Carolina State Bar which provides free, confidential assistance to lawyers, judges, and law students in addressing substance abuse, mental health issues and other stressors which impair or may impair an attorney’s ability to effectively practice law. In sum, our mission is to: 1. Protect the public from impaired lawyers and judges; 2. Assist lawyers, judges, and law students with any issues that are or may be impairing; 3. Support the on-going recovery efforts of lawyers and judges

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

The North Carolina Lawyer Assistance Program’s (“NC LAP”) roots began in 1979 with the assemblage of a group of lawyer volunteers who were themselves recovering alcoholics who saw the need to offer assistance to other lawyers suffering from addiction and alcoholism. The group was named the Positive Action for Lawyers with Substance Abuse Issues (“PALS”) committee. In 1994, the State Bar formally recognized the PALS Committee and incorporated PALS as part of the State Bar administration and infrastructure. In 1999, further recognizing the need for additional assistance for lawyers dealing with mental health issues not related to substance abuse, the State Bar then formed the FRIENDS committee.

4. Educate the legal community about the issues of substance abuse and mental health.

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

67

PAGE 4

Lawyer Assistance Program Overview

NC LAP Goals and Guiding Principles NC LAP Guiding Principles:



To respond to the referral and identification of legal professionals who may be impaired and need assistance;





To assist NC LAP clients in their personal recovery from addiction, or physical or mental health conditions;

The program recognizes that the most effective way to protect the public is to insure the mental health and emotional integrity of the legal profession;



To educate the legal community on identification, assessment, referral, treatment and resources available to meet the needs of judges, lawyers, law students;

The program recognizes that addiction, mental health issues and physical disabilities are treatable conditions and are not moral issues;



The program is motivated by a humanitarian concern for the legal community and the public;



The program also recognizes that accountability is key in treating many impairments;



Impaired lawyers and judges are ethically obligated to seek assistance and to participate in services necessary to renew their full effectiveness;



Lawyers and judges have a moral and ethical responsibility to recognize the signs and symptoms of a colleague who may be impaired and to assist the colleague in accessing appropriate services.









To provide a network of trained volunteers who are available to respond to the needs of NC LAP clients through a peer assistance model; To monitor and assist clients while they work to gain admission to practice law, rehabilitate and return to the practice of law or to a better quality of life; To establish and maintain a cooperative and on-going working relationship with the Superior and District Courts of North Carolina and their judges, the NC State Bar Office of Counsel, the CLE Board and other administrative offices of the NC State Bar, the Board of Law Examiners and the legal community at large.

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

NC LAP Program Goals:

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

68

Lawyer Assistance Program Overview

PAGE 5

How the Program Works

For those clients who are not selfreferred, about 40% of calls come from colleagues, judges, friends, and family members who are concerned about a lawyer, judge, or law student who may be showing signs of a mood disorder or a problem with substance abuse. Of that 40%, about 90% of those calls are concerns about alcoholism or substance abuse. Our clinician will offer suggestions on ways to express concern and motivate the individual to get help. Often, in the case of these referrals, the person making the referral prefers to remain anonymous and not participate further in the process. Sometimes, LAP will refer the caller to a professional interventionist or the LAP will assist in conducting either a formal or an informal intervention.

Confidentiality is the Cornerstone All client interactions with LAP are held in strict confidence as are any referrals. The only exception is if an individual signs a release of information and asks LAP to report on his or her behalf to another organization or individual. Confidentiality is guaranteed by Rule 1.6(c).

Intervention is a group process that, with respect and concern, helps an individual who may not realize he or she has a serious problem with alcohol or other drug use. The objective is to dismantle denial, stop family and friends from enabling the subject’s behavior, and initiate change. For informal interventions without a professional interventionist, LAP uses a peer intervention model with two trained, experienced volunteers who are in recovery from the same issue. The LAP volunteers meet with the subject individual and share their experience with him or her. In the course of that meeting, they inform the individual about the services offered by LAP. Because recovery is an ongoing process, we also continue to work with individuals following treatment as part of an aftercare plan. Although we address serious mental health and addiction problems, we encourage lawyers to seek assistance for less severe issues of stress, grief, or simply feeling overwhelmed. Everyone has problems at times and the confidential help available through LAP can prevent problems from becoming more severe. Whatever the issue is that brings an individual to LAP for assistance, we follow up with ongoing case management services.

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

69

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

About 50% of calls to LAP are selfreferrals from those who recognize they have a problem and ask for help. About 90% of these problems range from temporary conditions caused by grief, relationship issues, or work difficulties to ongoing struggles with anxiety and depression. About 10% of the self-referred clients are calling about alcoholism or addiction. Usually LAP clinicians do an assessment, in person wherever possible, or refer the individual to an outside professional for an assessment. LAP works with treatment programs throughout the country as well as with individual therapists, psychologists, and psychiatrists, and often makes referrals to these professionals. We can also arrange peer support with one of our trained LAP volunteers who has experienced a similar problem and successfully managed it and we invite the client to attend the local lawyer support group meeting.

PAGE 6

The Year in Review ~ Statistical Snapshot NEW CASES/FILES

135 NEW CASES BY REGION

37%

41%

East Piedmont

22%

West

Now in its 36th year of operation, NC LAP is busier than ever. NC LAP typically fields anywhere from five to ten “new inquiry or concern” calls a week in each of its Charlotte and Raleigh offices, totaling approximately 600-800 telephone calls, from impaired attorneys, judges, or law students, or concerned family members, managing partners, and colleagues. Of these calls this year, 109 resulted in newly opened files, with 26 additional files reopened, bringing the total number of opened cases to 135. We closed 69 files resulting in a combined total of 494 open cases at year’s end.

Many of the calls that do not result in the opening of a new file include situations where a lawyer or a judge calls seeking guidance for next best steps. For example: 

An older lawyer may need to wind down a practice and the judge or lawyer who is concerned does not know how to approach the individual or what to say. We coach them and eventually become directly involved if needed, but we typically do not open a file. We have recently begun collaborating with the TLC on these cases, and we do not open a file.



A Bar Councilor, judge or lawyer may call to ask for guidance about a certain lawyer or situation without giving us the name of the lawyer at issue. We will often coach the caller through that situation and/or provide some referral resources.



A lawyer has a child (ranging from teen to middle aged) who has an impairment requiring treatment and needs a referral for a treatment center or mental health provider.

494 TOTAL CASES BY REGION



Lawyers sometimes call in and need treatment center recommendations for their own clients who appear to be impaired professionals (like doctors, nurses, pilots, etc).

35% 39%

26%

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015



Lawyers who have attended a CLE where we spoke and are seeking a recommendation for a good therapist in his or her local area, but where it is clear there is not a need for full LAP involvement or case management. LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

70

PAGE 7

The Year in Review ~ Statistical Snapshot

REFERRAL SOURCES The rate of self-referral to LAP increased by 4% to 52%. This year 32% of LAP referrals came from colleagues, law firms, friends, family and judges who expressed concern about a lawyer or judge. The remaining 16% of referrals came from law schools, the board of law examiners, other LAPs, therapists, physicians, state bar staff or the grievance committee. We saw a shift this year with 4% of cases moving from the other category to self referral with the percentage of colleague referral remaining the same.

REFERRAL SOURCES

Referred by

16% 52% 32%

Self Colleague Other

Another LAP

4

Another Lawyer Bar Staff

92 29

Board of Law Examiners DA

14 1

Family Law Firm/Employer

26 17

Friend, Non-lawyer Grievance

4 8

Judge Law School

17 12

Other Physician

5 6

Self

256

Therapist

3

Grand Total

GENDER

Total

494

GENDER

The gender breakdown for clients seeking services this year was 67%

33%

men and 33% women. We saw a slight 67%

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

uptick in the percentage of women seeking services.

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

71

PAGE 8

The Year in Review ~ Overview of Issues

Many clients exhibit problems in more than one category, so there is overlap in documenting the issues. We continue to see psychological problems more often than other issues and these frequently coexist with substance abuse issues. Some issues, like codependency, appear across the spectrum and could fit within multiple categories. Although lawyers rarely come to us with only career related issues, many describe their job-related concerns that exist along with depression, anxiety and problem drinking. The term “process addiction” refers to compulsive behaviors such as problem gambling, eating disorders, compulsive spending or sexual addiction including overuse of internet for sexual reasons. Of the total open files as of July 31, 2015, here is the breakdown of the issues in both real numbers and percentages:

Medical

Process Addiction Psychological

Real

Family/Relationship

Numbers

Substance Abuse Career 0

50

100 150 200 250 300 350

8%

2-3%

Career Substance Abuse

36%

42% 10%

Family/Relationship Psychological Process Addiction Medical

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

72

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

Percentages

PAGE 9

The Year in Review ~ A Closer Look at the Issues

PSYCHOLOGICAL ISSUES (414 CASES) In the psychological category, we are seeing more complex issues and individuals with multiple issues that compound each other. Depression remains by far the single largest issue facing lawyers today.

ADD-ADHD

13%

7%

5%

4%

Anger Management

14%

Anxiety Bipolar

43% (179 cases)

We also have clients dealing with grief and loss, psychosis, schizophrenia, thoughts of suicide, obsessive compulsive disorder, and severe financial distress. Each of those categories represents 1-2% of total cases and because each is such a small percentage, they have been omitted from the chart on the right.

Depression Other Personality Disorder PTSD-Trauma Stress

Burnout

2% 24%

28% 14%

19% 14%

Career Couseling

Compassion FatigueSecondary Trauma Grievance or DHC Issues Other Workaholism

Many of the career issues that lawyers report are co-occurring with psychological issues or substance abuse issues. Sometimes career issues cause psychological or substance abuse issues and sometimes pre-existing psychological or substance abuse issues can cause career issues. It is important to discern and treat the core cause while also addressing the co-occurring symptoms.

Now that there is established research on compassion fatigue in the legal profession, we have begun tracking compassion fatigue, which can mirror depression in many respects. We are seeing a fair number of cases of compassion fatigue and secondary trauma, especially in lawyers who are working in practice areas involving criminal law, domestic and family law, personal injury and workers compensation. Many NC judges also report suffering from compassion fatigue and secondary trauma. LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

73

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

CAREER ISSUES (58 CASES)

PAGE 10

The Year in Review ~ A Closer Look at the Issues

ALCOHOL AND DRUG PROBLEMS (341 CASES)

Alcohol

Alcoholism remains by far the single largest problem

7%

lawyers are dealing with, with over 70% of cases reporting problems with alcohol. We also have seen a surge in recent years

8%

Cocaine or Crack

8%

Crystal Meth (Amphetamine)

72%

Designer Drugs

(244 Cases)

Heroin

of the abuse of prescription drugs, whether prescribed and

Marijuana

being used in a manner not as

Other

prescribed or those same drugs being used without a

Prescription Drugs

prescription.

PROCESS ADDICTIONS (13 CASES) While the word addiction traditionally refers to overuse of alcohol and drugs, it also applies to compulsive behaviors, such as

90% (12 cases)

gambling, sex, work, eating, shopping/spending, internet usage, or other technologically driven activities such as video gaming. Rather than being addicted to a substance, the person is addicted to a behavior, or

about by a certain behavior or action. The suffering, losses, and devastating consequences stemming from process addictions are similar to those of alcohol/drug addiction. Like addiction to alcohol/ drugs, process addictions follow a characteristic course with similar phases and stages. A process addiction follows a destructive process characterized by a recognizable set of signs and symptoms. It is progressive in nature. Left untreated, it will only continue to get worse over time. The highest percentage we are currently seeing involve use of sexual internet websites while at work. LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

74

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

more precisely: the feeling brought

PAGE 11

The Year in Review ~ A Closer Look

FAMILY ISSUES (87 CASES) Some lawyers have been deeply affected emotionally and psychologically by the substance abuse of a parent or a grandparent. The syndrome and symptoms associated with such a scenario is “ACOA” which

6% 41%

ACOA

20%

(36 cases)

Al-Anon

9%

Caregiving of Family Member

24%

Codependency

stands for Adult Child of an Marriage/Relationship

Alcoholic. We have lawyers who also seek our assistance because they have a spouse , partner or child who is a substance abuser (Al-Anon). A majority of our clients experience some form of marriage or relationship difficulty, but we only track those who have this issue as a primary issue.

MEDICAL ISSUES (19 CASES) Sometimes lawyers

47%

Cognitive Impairment

Injuries

(9 cases)

Menopause

16%

Neurological Physical Disability Other

are coping with a medical issue or a physical disability or injury. Sometimes the issue warrants assistance in coping with early retirement or winding down a practice. Sometimes the issue warrants assistance with coping and management strategies as well as support for the ongoing emotional strife of dealing with a medical issue.

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

75

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

Chronic Pain

PAGE 12

The Year in Review ~ CLE Continuing Legal Education and Outreach The best intervention always begins with education. In addition to our 4 quarterly articles appearing in the State Bar Journal, the LAP continues to provide CLE presentations for across the state. Minority Outreach Conference The Minority Outreach Conference continues with great success. This year it was held in Chapel Hill on February 20, 2015. In its fifth year, the conference’s goal is to reach out to minority members of the bar. Historically, LAP has been underutilized by African American attorneys. The conference provides an opportunity to explore themes related to practice unique to African American attorneys and to dispel myths about the LAP and how it works. We reached registration capacity of 400 African American attorneys with 340 in actual attendance.

Justice Cheri Beasley did a wonderful job as keynote speaker for the conference. Following Justice Beasley’s keynote was a roundtable discussion focusing on Special Considerations Unique to African American Attorneys. Panel participants included attorneys Glenn Adams, Fred Williams, Claudia McClinton, Lenita Arrington and Terry Sherrill. The afternoon session featured a high energy presentation by Charlotte therapist, Courtney Nesbitt, entitled Professional and Black: Owning the Differences, Addressing the Barriers, Finding the Balance. The final session of the day was a presentation from well-known publicist and author Terrie Williams. Ms. Williams shared stories about her battle with depression and the impact that it had on her life and career. Immediately after the conference, LAP hosted a book-signing reception where participants were able to purchase copies of Ms. Williams’ latest best-selling book, Black Pain, It Only Looks Like We’re Not Hurting.

LOCATIONS OF ATTORNEYS REPRESENTED AT 2015 MINORITY OUTREACH CONFERENCE

Apex Asheville Binghamton Carrboro Cary Chapel Hill Charlotte Clayton Clemmons Columbia, SC Concord Durham Fayetteville Fuquay Varina Goldsboro Greensboro Greenville Henderson

Number 4 1 1 1 9 5 55 2 1 2 3 89 14 2 1 10 4 1

City Hickory Hillsborough Holly Springs Kannapolis Knightdale Lancaster, SC Louisburg Matthews Mebane Morrisville Mount Holly Mt. Holly New Bern Newport Oxford Pembroke Pleasant Garden

Number 1 3 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

City Raeford Raleigh Red Springs Research Triangle Roanoke Rapids Rolesville Roxboro Sanford Smithfield Statesville Wake Forest Walkertown Warrenton Whitsett Wilmington Wilson Winston Salem

Number 4 71 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 13

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

City

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM * Yellow shaded locations indicate areas with greatest number of participants: Charlotte, Durham and Raleigh Green shaded locations indicate out-of-state attorneys practicing in North Carolina.

76

PAGE 13

The Year in Review ~ CLE

Substance Abuse and Mental Health CLE Presentations Although we can tailor any program to specific needs or audiences, our most popular educational programs are: 

Getting Lost in Our Own Lives (focus is on preventive work-life balance and inherent stress of the profession) (this program has been adapted for the Professionalism for New Admittees Program)



Compassion Fatigue: The Price We Pay As Professional Problem Solvers



Mentally Preparing for Life’s Transitions – the Psychology of Change (focused on the emotional impact of preparing for retirement)



Addiction Basics and the Lawyer Assistance Program

Substance Abuse and Mental Health CLE Presentations

We’ve seen a big jump in the number of CLE presentations in recent years as we now provide the presentation on work-life balance to all newly admitted lawyers as part of the Professionalism Program for New Admittees. To accommodate these greater numbers, 32 volunteers to date have been trained to give this talk. Typically six or seven different CLE sponsors need the 120 presentation delivered on the same day. Many CLE sponsors are now 100 recording our live presentations and 80 offering video replays, which we are also now attempting to track. 60 Video Replays We sometimes receive CLE Programs 40 requests to use our LAP History or Lawyer Risk and Resiliency Videos. 20 They are now available on our website via YouTube and are easily 0 downloadable for any CLE YR 2011 YR YR 2013YR 2014YR 2015 presentation. 2012 LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

77

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

The LAP presented at least 88 CLE programs this year (see Appendix A) with 19 additional video replays. We are able to present this volume of programs due to our dedicated volunteers who regularly speak and present as LAP representatives. Occasionally our volunteers are asked directly to speak at a CLE in addition to the requests that formally come through our office, and we do not necessarily receive that information for statistical reporting purposes. CLE remains our best outreach tool.

PAGE 14

Volunteers LAP’s Trained Volunteers Make a Difference

Volunteers are the foundation of NC LAP. Our trained volunteers provide peer support to lawyers in need and they serve on informal intervention teams to help those lawyers and judges who may not realize they have a problem. LAP volunteers also serve as CLE speakers who help educate the legal profession about substance abuse and mental health problems. Our volunteers give their time and assistance Volunteers by Region because they recognize and believe their participation is valuable and beneficial for the legal profession and because they find it 17% 41% personally rewarding to help others find the West solutions they found so transformative. LAP 42% has volunteer opportunities for attorneys and East judges 1) who themselves are in recovery Piedmont from alcohol or drug problems, depression, anxiety or other mental health problems, or 2) who have experienced a family member or friend who has suffered from alcoholism or other substance abuse issues, depression, anxiety or other mental health problems and who had to learn how to effectively deal with that situation. LAP volunteers are not volunteers in the usual sense. All LAP volunteers receive formal and informal training from LAP staff. Volunteers are individually selected to be paired with clients based upon the facts and circumstances of their experience and that of the lawyer who is of concern. We currently have 200 LAP Volunteers. As described, the LAP network of volunteers and lawyer support groups provide a major part of the assistance given by the LAP to lawyers around the state. Without the extended volunteer network, it would be impossible for the LAP to be as effective as it has been during the past year. On an interesting note, our current volunteer base is represented by the following NC law schools (some of our volunteers did not attend law school in NC).

Volunteers by NC Law School Campbell Charlotte Duke Elon Central Wake Forest UNC

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

78

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

NC Law School Total Volunteers Campbell 15 Charlotte 3 Duke 4 Elon 1 Central 16 Wake Forest 34 UNC 63

PAGE 15

Volunteers LAP Steering Committee The LAP Steering Committee is a volunteer leadership committee. It was formed in 2012 when the former PALS and FRIENDS subcommittees combined into one committee. LAP Steering Committee members are all active LAP volunteers from across the state and are appointed by the LAP Director. The Steering Committee is composed of 2 volunteers (a member and an alternate) from each of the LAP meetings across the state as well as 2 members at large from each region (West, Piedmont and East).



Ongoing operation of SIDEBAR, an electronic quarterly newsletter as an outreach tool,



In continuation of the law school initiative, the committee developed content about LAP for inclusion on law schools’ websites and is working on character and fitness brochures that will contain information about LAP for distribution at all law schools,



Having secured the one-hour work-life balance hour as part of the mandatory Professionalism for New Admittees program across the state, steering committee members attended training to give the program and volunteered to speak at PNAs through the remainder of the year, and



Continuation of a 12-step study retreat weekend (not paid for by LAP, but self-supporting through paid registrations of participants) that was revived in 2013 and held this year at Browns Summit to rave reviews.

The LAP Steering Committee continues great and dedicated work and we look forward to its continued visionary process and success.

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

79

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

The LAP Steering Committee selects projects and initiatives that it deems important to the function or direction of the LAP. The LAP Steering Committee has continued to build upon its momentum from last year with these selected major initiatives this year:

PAGE 16

Administration New Website: www.nclap.org

It has taken the better part of a year to develop and launch a brand new website, and it has been worth the effort. The new LAP website has a totally different look and feel than our old website. Knowing what we know today about client-driven internet usage, the site has been completely reconceptualized and brought up to today’s standards in terms of both content and structure. The all-new content is comprehensive while remaining approachable. The site is streamlined and easy to navigate. It now contains landing pages for CLE requests, special sections for volunteers and family members, and articles on a variety of issues.

Training 

The 35th Annual LAP Meeting and Workshop was held November 7-9, 2014 at the Holiday Inn SunSpree Resort, Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. Approximately 150 lawyer volunteers attended the event to receive on-going training. Justice Robert Edmunds was in attendance and presented the Chief Justice’s LAP Service Award.



The 36th Annual LAP Meeting and Workshop will be held on November 6-8, 2015 at the Crowne Plaza Resort in Asheville.



Due to high demands for certain CLE presentations and in preparation for providing the one hour worklife balance hour for the Professionalism for New Admittees program, the LAP held 2 stand-alone volunteer speaker trainings (and immediately put these dedicated volunteers to work) as follows: 

August 4th— Getting Lost in Our Own Lives, Charlotte, NC— 9 volunteers were trained to speak on this subject



August 5th— Getting Lost in Our Own Lives, Raleigh, NC—15 volunteers were trained to speak on this subject

Local Volunteer Meetings

Asheville

Greensboro

Charlotte

Greenville

Durham-Chapel Hill

Raleigh

Fayetteville/Sandhills

Wilmington

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

The LAP continues the development of local volunteer meetings to provide greater continuity and support in meeting the needs of lawyers new in recovery and allowing volunteers the chance to grow in their own recoveries. Local volunteer support meetings are held in the following areas (contact the clinical coordinator in the area for more information as to time and location):

Winston-Salem

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

80

PAGE 17

Administration

LAP Board Darrin Jordan, Chair Lanée Borsman John Bowman Christopher Budnick Barbara Christy Jerry Jernigan, Vice Chair Dr. Joseph Jordan Dr. Nena Lekwauwa Robert “Bert” Nunley

LAP Board Meetings Scheduled For 015

-015

LAP Board meetings are usually scheduled for lunchtime on Wednesday of the week the Bar Council meets except in October. Instead, the LAP Board meets at the Annual LAP Meeting and Conference held the first weekend in November. The upcoming schedule is as follows:

2015 November 6-8 – Crown Plaza Resort, Asheville, NC 2016

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

January 19-22 - NC State Bar Headquarters, Raleigh April 19-22 - NC State Bar Headquarters, Raleigh July - TBA November 4-6 – Probably Wrightsville Beach

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

81

Appendix A—CLE Sponsor

8/7/2014 NCBA

City

8/15/2014 Catawba County Bar

Concord Newton

8/20/2014 Clerk of Superior Court Summer Conference

New Bern

8/27/2014 Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice and Poyner Spruill

Winston Salem

8/28/2014 NC Child Support Council

Concord

9/4/2014 Campbell Law School Connection Mentor Program

Raleigh

9/10/2014 Duke Energy

Charlotte

9/12/2014 Virginia LHL Conference

Wintergreen, Va

9/19/2014 District Bar Meeting (District 15A)

Burlington

9/24/2014 Lowes Legal Department

Mooresville

9/24/2014 Association of Legal Administrators 10/2/2014 UNC School of Law

Cary Chapel Hill

10/2/2014 Attorneys Title

Wilmington

10/3/2014 Wake County Bar

Raleigh

10/3/2014 28th Judicial District - PNA

Asheville

10/7/2014 Attorneys Title

Greensboro

10/9/2014 School of Government

Raleigh

10/9/2014 NC Industrial Commission Education Conference

Raleigh

10/10/2014 NCBA - Annual Review

Greensboro

10/10/2014 Charlotte School of Law

Greensboro

10/10/2014 Mecklenburg County Bar

Charlotte

10/14/2014 Investor Title

Pinehurst

10/18/2014 Advocates for Justice

Asheville

10/18/2014 NCAWA

Asheville

10/18/2014 Law to the People - PNA

Raleigh

10/23/2014 NC Bar Association

Cary

10/29/2014 Campbell Law School Initiative

Raleigh

11/13/2014 Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice and Poyner Spruill 11/13/2014 Greensboro Criminal Bar Ass’n

Charlotte Winston Salem

11/14/2014 Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice and Poyner Spruill

Raleigh

11/14/2014 Attorneys Title - Paragon Group

Raleigh

11/20/2014 Advocates for Justice

Raleigh

12/2/2014 NCBA - PNA

Cary, NC

12/4/2014 MCB - PNA

Charlotte

12/9/2014 NCBA - PNA

Charlotte

12/10/2014 Mecklenburg County Bar

Charlotte

12/12/2014 Rowan County Criminal Law CLE

Salisbury

12/15/2014 NCBA - PNA

Charlotte

12/16/2014 Attorneys Title

Winston Salem

12/19/2014 Haywood County Bar

Waynesville

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

Date

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

82

1/15/2015 Mecklenburg County Bar

Charlotte

1/15/2015 Inns of Court

Durham

1/26/2015 NCBA

Cary

1/30/2015 Wake Forest Law School Initiative

Winston Salem

1/30/2015 Dispute Resolution Seminar

Pinehurst

2/2/2015 GAL Attorney Advocacy

Asheville

2/3/2015 BridgeTrust Title Group

Raleigh

2/5/2015 Mecklenburg County Bar

Charlotte

2/6/2015 NCBA Workers Comp Annual Section Meeting

Greensboro

2/12/2015 NCBA - PNA Webinar

Webinar

2/12/2015 NCBA - PNA Webinar

Webinar

2/12/2015 Lowes Legal Department

Mooresville

2/12/2015 BridgeTrust Title Group

Greensboro

2/16/2015 NCBA - PNA Webinar

Webinar

2/17/2015 NCBA - PNA Webinar

Webinar

2/19/2015 Advocates for Justice

Webinar

2/19/2015 NCBA - PNA Webinar

Webinar

2/19/2015 Chief Justice Commission on Prof

Greensboro

2/20/2015 NCBA Business and Inter Law Sections Meeting

Pinehurst

2/23/2015 NCBA - PNA Webinar

Webinar

2/24/2015 NCBA - PNA Webinar

Webinar

2/25/2015 Advocates for Justice

Raleigh

2/26/2015 Advocates for Justice

Webinar

3/11/2015 Inn of Court

Raleigh

3/12/2015 BridgeTrust Title Group

Fayetteville

3/13/2015 NC Association of Defense Attorneys

Raleigh

3/13/2015 UNC School of Gov

Chapel Hill

3/18/2015 NC Conf of Bar Pres/NCBA Local Bar Serv Com

Cary

3/19/2015 Federal Public Defenders Office Eastern NC

Carolina Beach

3/20/2015 District Bar Meeting (District 12)

Fayetteville

3/23/2015 Myers Bigel Sibley & Sajovec

Raleigh

3/27/2015 NCBA Zoning and Land Use Section

Cary

4/10/2015 NCBA Administrative Law

Cary

4/10/2015 Dare Co District Bar Meeting (District 1)

Southern Shores

4/14/2015 Law Offices of James Scott Farrin

Durham

4/25/2015 NC Electric Corporative Attorney Association

Myrtle Beach, SC

05/06/15 BridgeTrust Title Group

Greenville

5/8/2015 Board of Legal Specialization

Charlotte

5/15/2015 District Bar Meeting (District 18)

Greensboro

5/16/2015 Western NC Bankruptcy

Charlotte

5/19/2015 NCBA - PNA

Cary

5/19/2015 MCB - PNA

Charlotte

5/23/2015 NCBA Tax Session

Kiawah, SC

5/29/2015 Eastern Bankruptcy Institute

Myrtle Beach, SC

6/10/2015 NC Creditors Bar

Raleigh

6/12/2015 23rd Judical Bar District

Roaring Gap

6/15/2015 Advocates for Justice

Sunset Beach, SC

7/30/2015 NCBA - PNA

Cary

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

Appendix A—CLE (continued)

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

83

Appendix A—CLE (continued) Video Replays NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay NCBA – PNA – Video Replay

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015

October 9, 2014 October 10, 2014 November 18, 2014 November 19, 2014 December 2, 2014 December 3, 2014 December 4, 2014 December 5, 2014 December 8, 2014 December 9, 2014 December 11, 2014 December 12, 2014 December 15, 2014 December 16, 2014 December 17, 2014 December 18, 2014 December 19, 2014 December 30, 2014 December 31, 2014

LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

84

ACAP – COMPLAINTS AGAINST LAWYERS – BROCHURE Pages: 85-86

What can you do when you retain an attorney and problems arise that cause you to question how well you are being represented? This publication is intended to answer that question. No matter whether the problem is great or small, the North Carolina State Bar is ready to provide assistance.

Where can you turn? The North Carolina State Bar Attorney Client Assistance Program. The State Bar is the agency that investigates complaints against North Carolina attorneys and, when appropriate, disciplines attorneys who violate the Rules of Professional Conduct. The Attorney Client Assistance Program (ACAP) was established to assist clients and attorneys in resolving minor problems that develop in the client/attorney relationship and to assist clients when they discover serious attorney misconduct requiring additional investigation.

How does the program work? Most of the work of the ACAP is done over the phone. When you call the State Bar you will be connected with a member of the ACAP staff. Please be patient. Because of the high number of calls, you will probably be required to leave a voicemail message. Calls are answered in the order received and a member of the staff will call you back as soon as possible. Generally, all calls are returned within one business day. A member of the ACAP staff will listen to your description of the situation and will suggest the best possible strategy to resolve the problem. If it is in your best interest to resolve the matter quickly and there is no evidence of serious misconduct on the part of the attorney, the ACAP staff member may intervene directly by calling or writing to your attorney. If evidence of serious misconduct is presented, you may be asked to file a formal grievance so that an appropriate investigation may be conducted. If you are concerned about the legal fees you have been charged, you will be provided information about the State Bar’s Fee Dispute Resolution Program.

How do I file a grievance or a petition for resolution of a fee dispute? Members of the ACAP staff are familiar with the rules of professional conduct that attorneys are required to follow. If your complaint involves a serious breach of these rules, the ACAP staff will explain how to file a formal complaint and will send a grievance form to you. (Forms may also be downloaded from the North Carolina State Bar website at: www.ncbar.gov.) When the State Bar receives your complaint, an investigation will be conducted and you will be informed of the outcome. The time needed for an investigation varies greatly, depending on the facts of the case and the number of grievances under investigation at any particular time. The State Bar also offers a fee dispute resolution program. This program attempts to resolve disputes over legal fees between attorneys and clients at no charge to the public. If you are disputing the amount you owe an attorney, a member of the ACAP staff will provide you with the appropriate form to begin the fee dispute resolution process.

What other assistance does the ACAP provide? Attorney Locator. If you have not been in contact with your attorney for some time and cannot locate him or her, the State Bar may be able to help. The State Bar maintains an

85

address database of all licensed attorneys in North Carolina and will provide you with the general information on file regarding how to contact the attorney. The State Bar will also inform you if the attorney is deceased or no longer engaged in the practice of law. Unauthorized Practice of Law. Generally speaking, all persons engaged in the practice of law in North Carolina must be licensed to do so. This protects the public by ensuring that all those providing legal services are subject to appropriate regulation. If you suspect someone of practicing law without a license, the State Bar will investigate appropriately. Attorney Discipline. Members of the ACAP staff will gladly provide you information regarding public discipline (reprimand, censure, suspension, disbarment) received by any North Carolina licensed attorney. You may also find this information on our website. Client Security Fund. The purpose of the Client Security Fund is to reimburse, in whole or in part in appropriate cases, clients who have suffered financial loss as a result of the dishonest conduct of an attorney. Members of the ACAP staff will provide you with the appropriate information and application if you are seeking reimbursement from this fund.

What do these services cost? Nothing. Services offered by the State Bar are made available to the public at no charge.

How do I contact the State Bar? You may call or write the State Bar at: The North Carolina State Bar PO Box 25908 Raleigh, NC 27611 (919) 828-4620 · Web address: www.ncbar.gov

86

FEE DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM Pages: 87-88

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BAR FEE DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM WHAT IS THE FEE DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM? The purpose of the Fee Dispute Resolution Program is to assist lawyers and clients to resolve disputes over legal fees without going to court. Under this program, any client, or person who pays a fee on behalf of the client, who disputes the fee charged or paid may file a petition with the North Carolina State Bar requesting fee dispute resolution. When the lawyer is attempting collection of the disputed fee, a reasonable effort must be made to advise the client of the Fee Dispute Resolution Program. The lawyer must give the client at least thirty days in which to file a petition with the State Bar before a lawsuit can be filed against a client for the disputed fee. When the client is seeking a refund of a disputed fee and petitions for fee dispute resolution, the lawyer must participate in good faith throughout the process. The petition for fee dispute resolution should be sent to the North Carolina State Bar, PO Box 25908, Raleigh, NC 27611-5908. The petition should contain a full explanation of the billing arrangement between the lawyer and the client, and specifically what is disputed regarding the fee and why. If there was a written fee contract, a copy should be provided, along with any other documentation that supports the petitioner’s position. The lawyer may reveal confidential lawyer/client information to the extent necessary to respond to the petition.

87

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU FILE YOUR PETITION? When the State Bar receives your petition, a copy will be sent to the lawyer, who will be asked to respond. Sufficient investigation will be conducted by the State Bar staff to determine if the matter is suitable for facilitation under the State Bar’s Fee Dispute Resolution Program. Staff may recommend dismissal of a petition if it is determined that the request is frivolous or moot, there is a lack of jurisdiction, or the facts support the conclusion that the fee was earned and is not excessive. The appointed designee of the State Bar Council must approve all recommendations for dismissal. If the matter is suitable for facilitation by the State Bar, a staff member will attempt to resolve the dispute by negotiating between the parties over the telephone or by letter. Some local district bars participate in this program. If you file your petition in one of those districts rather than with the State Bar, binding arbitration may also be offered as an alternative method of resolution. Both parties must agree in writing to make the process binding, and the decision is enforceable in any court of competent jurisdiction. Local bars do not conduct non-binding arbitration. The Fee Dispute Resolution Program does not have jurisdiction over legal fees that are, or were, the subject of litigation. The goal of the program is to determine if the amount of the fee billed for legal services is reasonable in view of the legal services rendered.

88

ABA – RESOURCES AND SERVICES Pages: 89-98

The Division for Bar Services Connects your bar to the American Bar Association and more than

1,000 state, local, minority, women's, and special-focus bar associations and foundations in the United States. DBS staff is dedicated to helping bars further their mission and accomplish their goals. Every Division service is versatile, progressive, and tailored to help every type of bar meet the needs of every type of member.

Consulting & Field Service The Field Service Program

Establishing your connection to the ABA and more than 1,000 bars across the country Our commitment to your bar and its mission begins with the Field Service Program. Field Service Representatives visit onsite and virtually with bars of every size and in every location, establishing relationships with executive staff and officers, learning firsthand about their bar’s activities, challenges, and goals. The Field Service Program is designed to use a minimal amount of your time to return to you multiple and lasting benefits. Following the visit, we begin addressing your needs by connecting you to solutions and resources needed to build a stronger association and we promote your strengths by using your successful programs as a model for other bars to follow. For more on the Field Service Program, visit: http://www.americanbar.org/groups/bar_services/services/field_service_program.html To schedule a visit, contact Karyn Linn at (312) 988-5350 or [email protected]

The Consulting Services Program

Helping your bar create and pursue its vision

Each of our Consulting Services is specially designed to help you examine and advance your bar. Whether you want to define your focus or increase productivity, there’s a Consulting Service to meet your every need:

    

Strategic Planning helps your bar set a course for the future Board Development helps the board work together as an effective leadership team Membership Surveys helps your bar hear from members about their needs Market Research helps your bar see where opportunities may exist Succession Planning helps your bar to maximize the executive director transition

Consulting Services are personalized and affordably priced. To schedule a consultation visit to your bar, contact Jennifer Lewin at (312) 988-5361 or [email protected] For more, visit http://www.americanbar.org/groups/bar_services/services.html

1

89

The Information Clearinghouse

Comprehensive information on every issue that affects your bar The Information Clearinghouse is the bar community’s definitive source for information on association issues, an 18,000-piece collection of resources by and for bar leaders unavailable anywhere else. Look to the Clearinghouse for insight and advice on any topic affecting your bar. Reports, samples, journal articles and, surveys can help you resolve issues both complex and obscure. The Division staff assists further by quickly referring specialized inquiries to the appropriate ABA entity, officer, or staff member. For more on the Clearinghouse, contact Molly Flood at (312) 988-5362 or [email protected]

The DBS Website: ambar.org/barservices

Connecting your bar to every Division resource – instantly

The DBS website brings DBS services closer to you than ever. Use it to register for meetings, research questions, request materials, and review publications. Visit today to accelerate your connection to our core services and access information and features available exclusively online:

Resource Pages

These topical resource pages from the staff experts at the ABA Division for Bar Services provide quick links to useful information to the organized bar community, some of which include: The President’s Pages Library, Governance Guide, IRS Form 990, Leadership Resources and much more.

Publications

DBS publications cover a wide variety of topics to assist bar leaders in creating and implementing programs, activities, and services that meet their members’ needs. Following are brief descriptions of a few of our best-selling titles:

Leadership Bar Leader Weekly

Learn what’s on the minds of the staff of the ABA Division for Bar Services. This weekly newsletter helps busy bar leaders stay up to date with the latest bar association news and key issues in the legal profession. (http://www.americanbar.org/groups/bar_services/publications/barleaderweekly.html)

Bar Leader Magazine

This is the essential, digital periodical for bar executives and officers. Bar Leader, published bi-monthly, covers the issues, trends, and activities that affect volunteer and staff leaders of state, local, and special-focus bar associations. (http://www.americanbar.org/publications/bar_leader.html)

New Bar President

This publication is a guide for any officer ascending to the role of president. It outlines the president’s key roles in governance, financial oversight, and communications with members and the public. It is the only handbook of its kind geared specifically to bar associations and bar leaders. (http://www.americanbar.org/publications/bar_leader.html)

The Bridge

Monthly updates featuring breaking news on relevant ABA activities and services, innovative bar-sponsored programs, and important upcoming events. (http://www.americanbar.org/content/newsletter/publications/bridge_home.html) 2

90

On Administration & Management 2012 Bar Activities Inventory

More than 50,000 indexed facts on the organization and programs of state and local bars. There are quick answers to questions on bars’ leadership and governance structure, membership benefits, CLE and public relations programs, and much more.

2015 State and Local Bar Association Membership Administration and Finance Report on the membership dues, administration, and finances of 188 responding state and local bars. It includes information on total cost to practice in each state, membership dues levels, and dues increases.

State and Local Bar Association Directory

A quarterly directory of profiles, and addresses for more than 300 bar associations and their leaders. The Directory’s contact information is also available on mailing labels.

For More: Visit the DBS Bookstore at http://www.americanbar.org/groups/bar_services/publications.html for a complete list of our publications with descriptions and excerpts. Order online or by phone at (800)285-2221. For questions, contact Joanne O’Reilly at (312)988-5348 or [email protected]

Administrative Services The Job Announcement Service

Your direct connection to the right candidate The Job Announcement Service is the most effective way to advertise an opening at your bar. Each announcement is professionally edited to ensure your message is attractive and clear, then mass-emailed, posted online, and seen by more than a thousand bar association employees nationwide. To send a job announcement, contact Michael Ward at (312)988-5356 or [email protected]

Association Management Services

Providing executive support for three membership entities which focus on the needs of bar and foundation officers and executives. Services include board management, program development, membership and financial management, communication coordination, and conference and event planning.

THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF BAR PRESIDENTS – WWW.NCBP.ORG

The organization for present, future, and past bar presidents; programming supplemented by the Metropolitan Bar Caucus.

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BAR EXECUTIVES – WWW.NABENET.ORG The organization for professional staff of bar associations and law-related organizations.

THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF BAR FOUNDATIONS – WWW.NCBF.ORG

The organization for professional staff, officers, and board members of bar foundations.

For questions on our Association Management Services or to join a membership group, contact Pamela Robinson at (312) 988-5345 or [email protected]

3

91

Leadership Training The Bar Leadership Institute March 15-17, 2017 March your bar closer to its mission

The Bar Leadership Institute is an indispensable training program for those entrusted with the stewardship of bar associations, whether prospective bar presidents or veteran bar executives. The program features plenary sessions, group discussions, and workshops on every aspect of bar management and provides an open atmosphere for expressing ideas, gathering opinions, and networking with fellow bar leaders. Over 300 registrants, including association executives, presidents-elect, and other prospective elected leaders, attend the event in Chicago each March. Financial scholarships are available. Upcoming BLI Sessions are scheduled:  March 15-17, 2017  March 14-16, 2018  March 13-15, 2019 Plan to attend to find out for yourself why the BLI has been called “The best thing the ABA does.” For more on the BLI, contact Karyn Linn at (312) 988-5350 or [email protected]

Bar School

Continue to develop your leadership skills and proficiency The ABA Division for Bar Services presents a monthly webinar series focused on topics of interest to the bar association community including updates on issues of concern to bar associations and the legal profession, trends, technology training and tips, and leadership and governance. The new BAR ESSENTIALS series, presented every other month, provides an effective onboarding program for new staff as well as refreshers for more seasoned staff with topics such as customer service and effective meetings. For more information and the program schedule, visit www.ambar.org/BarSchool. To register for Bar School, visit ambar.org/barschool. Contact Joanne O’Reilly at (312)988-5348 or [email protected] with any questions.

ABA Division for Bar Services 321 N. Clark St., Fl. 16 ♦ Chicago, IL 60654 Call: (312) 988-5998 E-mail: [email protected] Visit: ambar.org/barservices Facebook: facebook.com/ABABarServices Twitter: @ABABARSERVICES

Updated: March 2016

4

92

DBS and our ABA colleagues can help you:

Keep up with the latest bar trends and information Subscribe to Bar Leader Magazine—The bi-monthly online magazine of in-depth stories on bar management, programming, leadership and technology. Read The Bridge—The monthly e-newsletter featuring resources from throughout the ABA that serve your association and your members. Access sample policies and better practices from our clearinghouse and online resource pages. Example pages include:  Small Bar Associations  IRS 990  Social Media  President’s Page Library Follow us on Twitter @ABABarServices, “Like” us on Facebook. Join us on LinkedIn. You’ll get the latest in late-breaking bar news, interesting analysis and a picture or two.

Gain an outside perspective Call our staff team. We are happy to give you a reality check on a program, governance issue or management dilemma. We’ll point you to the right person with the right expertise. We’ll keep your confidence.

Develop your board and leadership Attend the ABA Bar Leadership Institute. Purchase New Bar President —A guide for any officer ascending to the role of president. It outlines the president’s key roles in governance, financial oversight, and communications with members and the public. Consider our customized board training and development for retreats and orientations. Engage us for strategic planning process design and facilitation.

For more information, visit us at: ambar.org/barservices or contact us at [email protected] or 312.988.5998

93

Ensure program success Access our clearinghouse which has thousands of program samples, references and “how to” documents. Email: [email protected] Assess and enrich your Lawyer Referral Service with a PAR visit or through the resources of the Standing Committee on Lawyer Referral and Information Services. Request assistance from the Center for Pro Bono for program development, technical assistance and peer-to-peer consulting. Get resources for your Law Day and civics education initiatives from the ABA Division for Public Education. Understand strategies for increasing diversity in your association and the profession, contact the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Inspire young lawyers. The ABA Young Lawyers Division facilitates the exchange of information and best practices among young lawyer groups from around the country.

Cultivate your staff and optimize your use of technology Attend Bar School, a monthly webinar focused on topics of interest to the bar association community including trends, technology training, leadership and governance. Visit the social media resource page on the DBS website.

Serve your members Link to resources available from the ABA’s Law Practice Division, and Legal Technology Resource Center. Learn about the association’s advocacy efforts through the ABA Governmental Affairs Office. Access the Professional Responsibility Law Speakers Bureau, a resource from the ABA Center for Professional Responsibility, intended to help those organizing conferences, workshops, continuing legal education, and similar programming. Get discounts on ABA books for your members as well as additional non-dues revenue for your bar through ABA Books for Bars. Reprint articles in your bar journal or newsletter from one of the hundreds of ABA publications. Email: [email protected]

For more information, visit us at: ambar.org/barservices or contact us at [email protected] or 312.988.5998

94

Essential Tools for Bar Leaders Dates to Remember Upcoming Bar School Webinars

Other Key Dates

Bar Essentials: Business Writing May 23, 2016

NABE Small Bar Conference Baltimore, MD June 23-25, 2016

Serving an Aging Profession June 2016 (Date TBD)

REGISTER HERE! www.ambar.org/barschool

NABE/NCBP/NCBF 2016 Annual Meeting San Francisco, CA NABE– August 2-4, 2016 NCBP & NCBF– August 4-6, 2016 Conference of Metropolitan Bar Associations Meeting Naples, FL September 15-17, 2016 NABE Communications Section Workshop Savannah, GA October 19-21, 2016 Financial Scholarships are offered for select Programs. Inquire for more details.

Resources Bar Leader Magazine This bi-monthly online news magazine covers key issues and trends relevant to bar leaders as well as indepth stories on bar management, programming, leadership, and technology. Articles are intended to generate ideas readers can apply at their own bars. Bar Leader Weekly This at-a-glance newsletter helps busy bar leaders stay up to date with the latest in bar association news and key issues in the legal profession. Bar Leadership Institute The BLI provides presidents-elect or other presidential-track officers with techniques and skills essential to effective bar leadership. The program features plenary sessions, group discussions, and workshops on every aspect of bar management and leadership. The BLI offers an open atmosphere for expressing ideas, gathering opinions, and networking with fellow bar leaders. The 2017 BLI is scheduled for March 15-17 in Chicago. Bar School: Affordable Continuing Education for Bar Association Staff and Leaders This monthly webinar series focuses on topics of interest to the bar association community including updates on issues of concern to bar associations and the legal profession, trends, technology training and tips, and leadership and governance. The new BAR ESSENTIALS series, presented every other month, provides an effective onboarding program for new staff as well as refreshers for more seasoned staff with topics such as customer service and effective meetings. For more information and the program schedule, visit www.ambar.org/BarSchool. Detailed information is available at www.ambar.org/barservices

95

Online Resource Pages These topical resource pages provide quick answers to pressing questions. From social media to Form 990 to the future of the legal profession, these pages link you to information of interest to the organized bar community. Gain access to this information at ambar.org/BarResources.

ABA Resources

Membership Resources

Diversity and Inclusion

President Pages Library

Future of the Legal Profession

Small Bar Associations

Governance Guide

Social Media

IRS Form 990

Unified Bar Associations

Leadership Resources

Connect with Us Subscribe at

ambar.org/barservices Popular pages—DBS subscriptions Follow us on Twitter

@ABABARSERVICES Become our fan on Facebook

facebook.com/ABABarServices Email us at

[email protected]

96

Every Bar Services staff member helps connect your bar to the resources it needs. Call On Us. Administration Roseanne T. Lucianek Division Director (312) 988-5344 [email protected] Justina Lin Program Assistant (312) 988-5998 [email protected] Bar Leadership Unit The National Association of Bar Executives The National Conference of Bar Presidents The Metropolitan Bar Caucus The National Conference of Bar Foundations Pamela E. Robinson Deputy Director (312) 988-5345 [email protected] Tondanisha Tomlinson Finance and Business Administrator (312) 988-5360 [email protected] Nora Warens NABE Member Services Coordinator (312) 988-6008 [email protected]

Rebecca Green-Jablonsky Committee Specialist (312) 988-5364 [email protected] Teresa Peavy Program Specialist (312) 988-5347 [email protected]

Steve Jones NCBP Member Services Coordinator (312) 988-5353 [email protected]

97

Bar Management, Information & Publications Unit Publications & Marketing

The Consulting Services Program

Joanne O’Reilly Staff Director (312) 988-5348 [email protected]

Jennifer Lewin Director, Knowledge Management and Governance (312) 988-5361 [email protected]

Michael Ward Information Research Specialist (312) 988-5356 [email protected]

Information Clearinghouse & Website Molly Kilmer Flood Research and Information Manager (312) 988-5362 [email protected]

The Field Service Program Karyn Linn Director, Outreach and Education (312) 988-5350 [email protected] Angie Euell Field Service Specialist (312) 988-6067 [email protected] Magdalena Bieniek Program Coordinator (312) 988-5349 [email protected] Bar Leader Magazine Marilyn Cavicchia Editor (312) 988-6071 [email protected]

DBS Staff. Call On Us. 321 North Clark Street  16th Floor  Chicago, Illinois 60654 Call: (312) 988-5343  Fax: (312) 988-5492 E-mail: [email protected] Visit: ambar.org/barservices

98

NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION – MENTORING PROGRAMS Pages: 99-110

 

Guidelines Goals The goals of the Mentorship Program are to (1) allow experienced practitioners to provide assistance to mentees as they enter the profession, (2) guide mentees in traversing the realities of the practice of law, in general, and (3) communicate the importance of being a citizen lawyer. The mentoring program is meant to be a part of a bridge between law school and the "real world" of legal practice. A successful mentoring program will help the legal profession as a whole by assisting young lawyers in developing good character, competence, and a deeper appreciation for the profession as a whole that they can take into their future years of practice. A mentor is an advisor, trainer, and teacher. A good mentor is both a good person and a good lawyer. In the legal arena, the mentor is someone who is able to guide a new attorney in the practice of law, give him or her instructional advice about local laws and customs, and help the mentee to grow personally, as well as professionally. The Mentorship Program administered by the North Carolina Bar Association (NCBA) offers two types of mentoring opportunities for mentees and mentors. The first is the more traditional one-on-one mentoring relationship, in which a new lawyer and a more experienced lawyer are paired with the expectation that they will establish an ongoing relationship. Examples of topics for discussion between mentees and mentors in a traditional relationship are issues of current concern of the profession, the mentors' approaches to ethical and professionalism dilemmas, career goals, types of legal practice, law practice management issues, and quality of life issues. However, the topics covered are only limited by what the mentor and mentee desire to cover. Conversations between mentors and mentees should be kept confidential. In addition to the traditional one-on-one mentoring option, the NCBA now offers a mentoring opportunity that will be based on the situational needs of new lawyers. Seasoned lawyers who would like to provide mentoring services but are not in a position to participate as a traditional mentor can now register to be available for single topic telephone conversations with new lawyers. The seasoned lawyer will identify the topics for which he or she would be willing to talk with a new lawyer and how often he or she would be available. When a new lawyer has an issue arise for which they need some guidance, he or she can contact the NCBA and be referred to an experienced attorney willing to assist on that topic. The goal of this new program component is to allow more experienced lawyers to participate as mentors and to provide immediate, focused assistance to new lawyers who may be in more rural areas of the state or who need guidance on a limited topic. As with the traditional relationship, conversations between mentors and mentees should be kept confidential.

99

 

Criteria to be a Mentor 1. A minimum of five consecutive years of active practice as a lawyer, and a lawyer in good standing with the North Carolina State Bar 2. No record of a published sanction by any state bar. Whether or not a record exists, no mentor may serve if they have had their license suspended, been disbarred, or voluntarily surrendered their license to dispose of a pending proceeding. 3. For mentors participating exclusively as a resource by phone, a willingness to commit at least an hour of time per month for one year to responding to calls from new lawyers. 4. For mentors participating in a more traditional mentoring relationship, a willingness to devote whatever time the mentor and mentee determine to be appropriate to accomplish whatever goals they seek to achieve.  

Criteria to be a Mentee 1. Be an active member in good standing with the N.C. State Bar, with priority given to members of the North Carolina Bar Association. 2. Be a practitioner of law for no more than three years.

Establishing the Relationship

  Where a pairing is made for a traditional one-on-one mentoring relationship, the mentee is expected to initiate contact with the mentor within fourteen days of the date of the correspondence notifying the mentee of the identity of the mentor. Matches of mentors and mentees are made on the basis of common interests, location, and other factors indicated on the application form. While mentors may be asked for guidance as to locations and types of practice, the Mentoring Program is not meant to serve recruitment or placement needs. Mentees and mentors who desire a more comprehensive and traditional mentoring relationship are encouraged to meet informally for breakfast, lunch, or dinner at the mentor's office or anywhere else that is mutually convenient. In addition, such mentors and mentees are free to structure the relationship to meet the needs of both the mentors and mentees availability. Such mentors are encouraged to invite mentees to attend hearings, meetings, lectures, or any special law-related event when appropriate. They are also encouraged to communicate by telephone rather than e-mail in order to establish a more personal relationship. Both mentors and mentees in the traditional relationships often have busy and unpredictable schedules, so mentees are thus urged to recognize that mentors are taking time away from work and other responsibilities to share time, wisdom, and experience. Please remember that it is the quality of the relationship and information shared, not the quantity of time spent, that determines the success of the mentoring relationship. Where a mentee is seeking assistance with a single topic or issue and requests telephone assistance from a mentor volunteer, a NCBA staff member will identify an available mentor 100

volunteer with expertise in that area and provide the mentee’s contact information to the mentor. The mentor should contact the mentee within 48 hours of receiving the contact information. If a mentor cannot commit to contacting the mentee within that time period, he or she should inform the NCBA staff member of that fact and the mentee will be assigned to a different mentor. Should a mentor and mentee participating in a situational pairing agree that they would like to continue in a mentoring relationship, the pairing can be changed to a traditional one-on-one pairing and the mentor will be removed from the situational rotation.

Limitations

  It is not necessary that a mentor practice law in the same area(s) of law as his or her mentee. A mentor is not a tutor. In a traditional pairing, a mentor's focus with his or her mentee should be imparting his or her knowledge and experience about such matters as professionalism, civility, dealings with opposing counsel and judges, dealings with clients and office staff, and balancing professional demands with personal, family, and civic obligations. Many of these same issues may arise in situational pairings, but the interaction typically will be a focused conversation on a single topic. In responding to a specific legal question from a mentee, a mentor should not be concerned about saying, "I don't know." However, the mentor should discuss how the mentee might find the answer to the question. The mentor should avoid discussions of actual cases or clients and should avoid providing specific substantive legal advice. The mentor may be asked questions relating to general substantive legal issues, and in such instances, should attempt to provide the mentee with appropriate resources and should use reasonable judgment in the information provided. Mentors should direct the new lawyer to the North Carolina State Bar for resolution of difficult ethical issues. This program is designed to supplement, not replace, similar programs which may be in place at law firms or sponsored by local or other bar association

101

 

 

MENTORING PLAN Introduction Thank you for participating the NCBA Mentorship Program. Connecting to a mentor or mentee in your community with strengthen the legal profession and better enable you to meet the needs of your clients in the future. Below you will find the model mentorship plan. This document is designed to help you establish expectations and obligations for both the mentee and mentor. By completing this mentoring plan, the two of you will know what to expect from each other, and the program.

Goals This plan will serve as the governing document for your mentoring relationship. You should complete the plan, and make every effort to achieve the goals you identify. By working through your goals, the mentee will become more acquainted with the profession and the practice, and the mentor will have an opportunity to give back in a meaningful way.

Instructions 1. Carefully read through the Mentoring Plan, and identify which goals you’d like to accomplish. 2. Take your plan to your first mentoring meeting. 3. Mentor and Mentee will work together to identify appropriate goals, and set a target date for their completion. 4. Review your progress on each goal each quarter. 5. At the end of the mentoring relationship, mentor and mentee will review completed goals, and reflect on how those goals have impacted the professional growth of the mentee.

102

 

MENTORING PLAN The Legal Community Find activities that will help the mentee connect to local attorneys, and make a good impression on judges, clients, and other lawyers.     Activity or Experience

Check if Selected

Date Completed

Mentor will introduce mentee to other lawyers in the community, lawyer’s staff, and local bar. Mentor will invite mentee to local bar association meeting. Mentor will escort mentee to local courthouse for a tour, and introduce him or her to members of the judiciary, clerks of court, and court personnel. Mentor will acquaint the mentee with the service opportunities available through the NC Bar Association, including Lawyers on the Line, and 4All. Discuss any unwritten rules of conduct or civility that are customary to the profession. Mentor will take mentee to the local jail if the mentee is likely to have clients there. Mentor will acquaint the mentee with pro bono organizations if the mentee is likely to work with them.

103

 

MENTORING PLAN Personal and Professional Development Select activities to help the mentee understand the Rules of Professional Conduct and a lawyer’s obligations to clients, the court, and the community.   Activity or Experience Check if Date Selected Completed Discuss the NC Rules of Professional Conduct. Discuss substance abuse and mental health issues facing many in the legal profession, and where to find help. Discuss practical ways to manage law school debt. Discuss job search strategies. Discuss common malpractice traps. Discuss resources for dealing with ethics issues. Discuss the benefit of carrying malpractice insurance. Discuss strategies for handling a situation where a lawyer believes another lawyer has committed an ethics violation. Discuss the grievance process. Discuss the importance of work-life balance. Discuss the CLE requirements for lawyers.

104

 

MENTORING PLAN Law Office Management and the Practice of Law Select activities to help the mentee better manage his or her law practice.     Activity or Experience Check if Selected Discuss client confidentiality, and the importance of maintaining it in conversations, paper files, and digital files. Discuss time keeping, time management, billing processes. Discuss best practices for billing clients, and keeping track of expenses. Discuss screening and recognizing problem clients. Discuss the procedure for leaving a firm, how to protect oneself, substitution of counsel, advising clients, and withdrawing from a matter. Discuss engagement and fee agreements, including best practices, and real world examples. Mentor will show mentee how the mentor’s office manages and retains records. Discuss where the mentee can find resources for law office management. Discuss the roles and responsibilities of paralegals and other office staff. Discuss the establishment of office procedures, and the creation of an office policies and procedures handbook. Discuss ways to prevent the unauthorized practice of law among the mentee’s staff. Mentor will demonstrate calendaring and tickling systems. Mentor will introduce the mentee to legal library and legal research systems the mentor is using, as well as options provided by the NCBA. Discuss office politics, including appropriate networking, socializing, and personal behavior. Discuss the importance of planning ahead for emergencies or disasters. Discuss trust accounting systems, and the importance of trust accounting rules.

Date Completed

105

 

MENTORING PLAN Client Communications, Advocacy and Negotiation Select activities to help the mentee become more skilled at client communications, advocacy and negotiation.   Activity or Experience Check if Date Selected Completed Discuss the importance of client communication, and how to maintain good, on-going communication, including the use of fee agreements, updating clients on matters, getting confirmation in writing, being on time, etc. Discuss the roles of the client and the lawyer in decisionmaking, and the importance of open communication with your clients. Discuss the relevant issues surrounding effective legal writing, such as techniques for the most effective legal writing, how to avoid common mistakes causing pleadings to be rejected, how to effectively use sample legal pleadings and forms, techniques to efficient legal research, etc. Discuss the best ways to evaluate a potential case and how to decide whether to accept a proffered representation. Identify how to deal with the ‘difficult’ client and how to decline representation of the unrealistic or ‘impossible client. Discuss how to identify or determine whom the client is when practicing in a corporate or government organization. Engage in a training discussion about client interaction, including tips for gathering information about a legal matter and appraising the credibility and trust of a potential client. Discuss methods of client development that have been successful for the mentor, and discuss other techniques for business development, including any relevant ethical concerns and the most professional practices in this regard. Train, through discussion and client interaction, how to best screen for, recognize and avoid conflicts with the client. Discuss proper legal counseling techniques, duties and the responsibilities of advising clients. Discuss fee setting for legal services and how to talk with clients about fees. Discuss retainer agreements. Explain document retention, and a lawyer’s obligations.

106

 

MENTORING PLAN Basic Litigation Skills Select activities to help the mentee develop basic litigation skills.   Activity or Experience Check if Selected Participate in or observe at least one client interview or client counseling session. Discuss appropriate ways for dealing with others on behalf of a client. Discuss tips for the preparation for and proper behavior during depositions. Discuss the most important points about negotiation with another lawyer and potential issues associated with negotiations. Observe an appellate court argument, and discuss the best ways to prepare for and deliver and oral argument. Discuss how to select a billing structure. Discuss how to best handle a difficult client. Mentee will participate in at least one client interview. Discuss proper counseling techniques, and duties and responsibilities of advising clients. Discuss relevant issues surrounding legal writing, such as techniques for the most effective legal writing, how to avoid common mistakes, how to effectively use sample pleadings, and legal research techniques. Draft a plea negotiations or reviewing a plea agreement. Draft a will and revocable living trust. Draft initial probate documents. Draft documents to form a business entity including articles of incorporation and business agreements. Draft settlement documents including a discussion of tax implications in any settlement award. Participate in an administrative hearing. Draft, amend, and review a contract. Review the rules of ADR. Discuss mandatory mediation. Draft a complaint and a summons. Discuss rules and requirements for initial and rebuttal expert witnesses disclosures and supplements. Draft a sample trial notebook.

Date Completed

107

 

MENTORING PLAN Advocacy and Litigation Select activities to help the mentee become skilled in more advanced litigation skills necessary for a practitioner who will spend much of his or her time litigating.   Activity or Experience Check if Date Selected Completed Attend an appellate argument in the NC Supreme Court. Attend a probate hearing on a motion, and discuss. Attend or participate in oral argument, and discuss. Attend or participate in a trial, including voir dire, and discuss. Discuss the frequent issues that arise in litigation concerning specific rules of Civil Procedure, and the local rules that apply in State and Federal Court. Participate in a settlement conference. Discuss the mechanics of a trial, including where to stand, proper attire, when to stand, courtroom decorum, etc. Draft discovery requests, including interrogatories, requests for admission, and requests for production of documents. Prepare for and observe a deposition. Draft an order for summary judgment. Discuss the mechanics of arbitration. Attend, or participate in arbitration. Discuss the mechanics of trial, including witness preparation and conduct in court room, handling demonstrative exhibits and/or electronic court system, exhibits, etc. Participate or attend pre-trial conference and participate in drafting pre-trial memorandum, if applicable. Draft jury questionnaire. Draft jury instructions. Draft voir dire. Attend calendar call. Draft findings of fact and conclusions of law. Attend a trial resulting in a jury verdict. Draft a settlement conference brief.

108

 

MENTORING PLAN Alternative Dispute Resolution Select activities to help the mentee develop his or her skills in the area of alternative dispute resolution.   Activity or Experience Check if Date Selected Completed Discuss different types of arbitration. Review NC’s statutes on mediation. Review agencies and entities that can assist with mediation. Observe or participate in a simulated mediation. Observe or prepare for an actual arbitration, and review NC’s rules on ADR. Discuss how to prepare a client for ADR. Discuss the importance of having an insurance carrier involved in the ADR process.

Negotiation Select activities to help the mentee become more familiar with negotiation skills and techniques.   Activity or Experience Check if Date Selected Completed Discuss how to prepare for the negotiation of a legal matter (e.g., release of a personal injury claim, lease agreement, collective bargaining agreement, etc.). Discuss when and how negotiation should be initiated. Discuss when and how to involve the client in negotiation. Discuss ethical and professional obligations of negotiators. Discuss skills needed to be an effective negotiator and how to acquire them. Discuss statutes that may affect negotiated results or dictate procedures to be utilized in negotiations (e.g. OWBPA requirements for a valid release, NLRA statutory requirements to qualify for ‘good faith negotiations’).

109

 

MENTORING PLAN Client Interviewing Select activities to help the mentee become familiar with client interviewing.   Activity or Experience Check if Selected Discuss and review interview techniques (asking the right questions). Discuss and review counseling techniques (providing the hard advice). Simulate and discuss the counseling of a client (mentor and new lawyer should alternate being client and lawyer). Participate in interviewing a client. Participate in counseling a client. Discuss early settlement benefits and/or alternative dispute resolution in light of the cost of litigation. Discuss the ethical considerations with client interviews (e.g. confidentiality, who can meet with a new client to execute fee agreements, etc.) Discuss when it may be proper to turn down the representation of a client after initially meeting with them. Discuss ethical considerations regarding client’s desires to delay litigation and/or push your representation beyond the Rules of Professional Conduct and dealing with such clients.

Date Completed

Additional Activities Describe any additional activities in which the mentor and mentee will participate as part of the mentoring experience.   Activity or Experience Check if Date Selected Completed

110

NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION – LAWYER REFERRAL SERVICE APPLICATION Pages: 111-112

Lawyer Referral Service Application

New Computer based LRS application form. New Members need to complete the online form below to begin their new membership request. This form is easy to find on the NCBA website. They then will automatically receive an email with a link to complete the online application process.

Then, they must fill out and return to us the attached Member Certification Form (that verifies insurance coverage). That form is on the next page.

111

North Carolina Bar Association Lawyer Referral Service Member Certification Form Please return this completed form to [email protected] or by mail to: North Carolina Bar Association, Lawyer Referral Service, 8000 Weston Parkway, Cary, NC 27513. Your LRS membership will not become active until the LRS staff receives this form along with requested verification of professional malpractice insurance coverage.

Name: Firm: Address: City/State/ZIP: Telephone: Email: Year Admitted to Practice:

State Bar #:

NCBA #: Please read the following and sign the acknowledgment below: I offer my application for registration as a member of the North Carolina Bar Association Lawyer Referral Service. As an LRS attorney member, I certify that:      

I am a North Carolina licensed attorney in private practice with an office in North Carolina. I am a member of the North Carolina State Bar in good standing. I am a member of the North Carolina Bar Association in good standing. I maintain current malpractice insurance coverage. I have never been suspended or disbarred. I am competent to practice law within any practice area panel that I have selected.

I understand that the LRS staff will collect customer satisfaction feedback from LRS-referred clients. I understand that the character, number, and/or frequency of service complaints by LRS-referred clients may result in my removal from the LRS. I understand that complaints about possible ethical violations by LRS members will be referred to the North Carolina State Bar. I have read and agree to the Lawyer Referral Service Guidelines and Policies (which can be found here: http://www.ncbar.org/members/lawyer-referral-service). Malpractice Insurance Certification and Indemnification Agreement I certify that I maintain professional liability insurance at $100,000/$300,000 minimum and I agree to keep a policy in force during the entire time that I am a member of the LRS. I will notify LRS of any changes to my malpractice insurance policy number, date of expiration or coverage. I agree to indemnify and save harmless the North Carolina Bar Association for and against any and all liability arising from my service as an LRS member and/or my representation of any LRS-referred clients. Name of Carrier: Policy Effective Date: Policy Number: Coverage Amount: Attorney Signature/Date Signed: Please return this signed form along with proof of professional malpractice insurance coverage (such as a copy of the cover page of your policy) via email to [email protected], or by mail to: North Carolina Bar Association, Lawyer Referral Service, 8000 Weston Parkway, Cary, NC 27513.

112

CENTENNIAL AWARD – NOMINATION FORM/CERTIFICATE EXAMPLE Pages: 113-118

Information on the Centennial Award - “What it is and How to do it” The Centennial Award provides an opportunity for local bars to partner with the NCBA to honor individual members of their bar annually for community service efforts. The service may be of any nature benefiting the city or county from which your local bar membership is drawn, including elected or appointed office, participation on community boards, and volunteer efforts with churches, schools, or other non-profit organizations. Knowing how much lawyers give back to their local communities, it is important to provide recognition where recognition is due and this award focuses attention on the good work that lawyers do every day. The Centennial Award is co-sponsored by the NCBA and was created in honor of the NCBA’s Centennial (1899-1999). The award was first presented in 1999, but it is designed to be an annual event for local bars. One of the goals of the NCBA Centennial was to inspire lawyers to the highest ideals of professionalism and service, as well as to celebrate the accomplishments of lawyers. Working with local bars annually to support and promote the Centennial Award will carry this goal forward for years to come. Here’s what you need to do to participate in the Centennial Award program: 1. Contact Carole Oliver at the NCBA (see bottom of this page) for nomination information to distribute to members of your local bar. 2. Decide when to present the award. It is recommended that the award be given in conjunction with your local bar’s Law Day activities or at any time that is suitable for your local bar. 3. Have a meeting of your board of directors or executive committee to review the nominations and determine the honoree. 4. Contact the NCBA with the name of the honoree. We will order the appropriate plaque and send it to you for presentation at your local bar meeting, at no cost to your local bar. Also, we are glad to assist with press releases and other suggestions for publicizing the award recipient in your local media. We stand ready to help your local bar with the Centennial Award. It is an easy and highly effective project for your local bar to undertake.

Questions? Contact Carole Oliver at 1-800-662-7407 or [email protected] {00101806.DOC}

113

Nomination Form for the NCBA Centennial Award Purpose of the Award: To enhance the image of the profession by recognizing the civic contributions of individual lawyers. This award is co-sponsored by the North Carolina Bar Association (NCBA) and is named in honor of the NCBA’s Centennial (1899-1999), in recognition of the 100 years of service that the NCBA has already provided to the community and in the spirit of continuing that tradition in the future. Selection Criteria: The Centennial Award annually honors an individual lawyer for outstanding effort in providing community service. The service may be of any nature that benefits the city and/or county or counties from which the bar membership is drawn. Examples of community service include, but are not limited to: elected and/or appointed service to local government; civic involvement on boards of community agencies; involvement in public service projects, such as Habitat for Humanity; volunteer involvement with schools, churches, or other nonprofit organizations. 1.

Information about Nominee: Name: Business name and address:

2.

Please describe the nominee’s community service activities, including dates of service (attach additional sheets, if necessary):

3.

Supporting Information (you are encouraged to attach supporting information and up to three letters on behalf of your nomination):

4.

Information about person making nomination: Name: Business name and address: Telephone: Email:

Please return this form and supporting information to: Carole Oliver PO Box 3688 Cary, NC 27519-3688 [email protected] {00101806.DOC}

114

115

__________________________________ President, North Carolina Bar Association

___________________________________ Chair, NCBA Local Bar Services Committee

Outstanding and Exemplary Community Service

for

John Doe

in recognition of

2nd Judicial District Bar Association

in conjunction with the

North Carolina Bar Association

presented by the

2016 Centennial Award

Centennial Award Recipients Recipient

Bar

Year

Mittie R. Smith Ronald P. Johnson Otis M. Oliver Stephen G. Royster J. Tyrone Browder

High Point Bar Association Greensboro Bar Association 17B Judicial District 17B Judicial District 17B Judicial District

Judge Edward A. Pone Judge J.B. Allen, Jr. Clifford C. Marshall, Jr. Judge George J. Franks Wiley P. Wooten Raymond A. Bretzmann Marc L. Isaacson John E. Gehring Nicholas James Overby Michael F. Royster Brian Anthony Royster District Court Judge Rebecca B. Knight Chief District Court Judge A. Elizabeth Keever

12th Judicial District and Cumberland Co. Bar 15A Judicial District 28th Judicial District 12th Judicial District and Cumberland Co. Bar 15A Judicial District High Point Bar Association Greensboro Bar Association 17B Judicial District 17B Judicial District 17B Judicial District 17B Judicial District 28th Judicial District Cumberland/12th Judicial District

November, 2015 Oct-15 May, 2015 May, 2015 May, 2015 May, 2015 February, 2015 November, 2014 November, 2014 November, 2014 November, 2014 May, 2014 April, 2014

Eloise M. Hassell

Greensboro Bar Association

November, 2013

Larry S. McDevitt

28th Judicial District

June, 2013

William P. Mayo

2nd Judicial District

May, 2013

Justice Edward T. Brady

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

April, 2013

Justice Patricia Timmons-Goodson

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

April, 2013

Judge John M. Tyson

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

April, 2013

Vance Barron, Jr.

Greensboro Bar Association

Superior Court Judge Gregory A. Weeks

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

June, 2012

John W. Mason

28th Judicial District

June, 2012

Superior Court Judge David Lee

Union County Bar Association

District Court Judge John W. Dickson

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

June, 2012

Renny W. Deese

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

June, 2012

Dale Deese

Robeson/16B Judicial District

May, 2012

Robert E. Price

Robeson/16B Judicial District

May, 2012

Robert C. Cone

Greensboro Bar Association

Sheila M. Lambert

28th Judicial District

June, 2011

Richard M. Wiggins

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

April, 2011

Harriett T. Smalls

Greensboro Bar Association

January, 2011

Superior Court Judge Dennis Winner

28th Judicial District

June 16, 2010

E. Lynn Johnson

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

June, 2010

Jack A. Thompson

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

June, 2010

Edward W. Grannis, Jr.

Cumberland/12th Judicial District

June, 2010

Kenneth W. McAllister

High Point Bar Association

April, 2010

Joy Ammons Ciriano

Alamance County Bar Association

101824

Apr-16 Jan-16 November, 2015 November, 2015 November, 2015

February, 2013

May, 2012

January, 2012

January, 2010

116

Centennial Award Recipients Recipient

Bar

Year

Alan W. Duncan

Greensboro Bar Association

February, 2009

Henry H. Isaacson

Greensboro Bar Association

February, 2009

Robert J. Deutsch

28th Judicial District

Fred S. Battaglia, Jr.

Durham County Bar Association

Charles T. Hagan III

Greensboro Bar Association

John S. Stevens

28th Judicial District

Edward C. Winslow, III

Greensboro Bar Association

Derek B. Steed

15A Judicial District

June 28, 2007

Grady Joseph Wheeler

15A Judicial District

June 28, 2007

Jeffrey A. Andrews

15A Judicial District

June 28, 2007

George Ward Hendon

28th Judicial District

June 13, 2007

Brandy Cook

Cabarrus County Bar Association

Richard A. Wood

28th Judicial District

Reid Phillips

Greensboro Bar Association

David Gantt

28th Judicial District

Sammie Chess, Jr.

High Point Bar Association

September 1, 2005

Rep. Joe Hackney

15B Judicial District

December 9, 2005

David Hillier

28th Judicial District

June, 2004

William Owen Cooke, Jr.

Greensboro Bar Association

June, 2003

Roy Davis

28th Judicial District

June, 2003

Kerry A. Friedman

28th Judicial District

June, 2001

Leslie O. Wickham, Jr.

Durham County Bar Association

June, 2001

A. Frank Johns

Greensboro Bar Association

January, 2001

Patrice A. Hinnant

Greensboro Bar Association

January, 2001

Edward N. Rodman

Beaufort County Bar Association

Walter F. Brinkley

22nd Judicial District

December, 2000

W. Louis Bissette, Jr.

28th Judicial District

June 28, 2000

A. Doyle Early, Jr.

High Point Bar Association

Carole W. Bruce

Greensboro Bar Association

November 18, 1999

Robert O. Klepfer, Jr.

Greensboro Bar Association

November 18, 1999

William P. Mayo, Sr.

Beaufort County Bar Association

November, 1999

James F. Morgan

High Point Bar Association

September, 1999

James B. Maxwell

Durham County/14th Judicial District

June, 1999

Denise S. Hartsfield

Forsyth County Bar Association

June, 1999

J. Edgar Moore

Nash-Edgecombe County Bar Association

June, 1999

William Allen Cobb, Sr. (deceased)

5th Judicial District

June, 1999

101824

June, 2009 May, 2009 February 19, 2009 June 11, 2008 March 20, 2008

May 4, 2007 June 14, 2006 January 20, 2005 June 15, 2005

December 6, 2000

September, 2000

117

Centennial Award Recipients Recipient Richard Randleman Henry C. Doby Charles Younce William P. Harris Aaron Neal Clinard Wanda Bracks Daughtry Richard L. Wharton T. Diane Phillips

Bar 23rd Judicial District 20rh Judicial District Greensboro Bar Association High Point Bar Association High Point Bar Association Greensboro Bar Association Greensboro Bar Association Robeson County Bar Association

Year June 24, 1985 June 24, 1985 June 24, 1985 June 24, 1985 June 23, 1985 June 23, 1985 June 23, 1985 June 23, 1985

118

LAW-RELATED EDUCATION INFORMATION AND PROGRAMS Page: 119

The Law-Related Education Advisory Committee Changing Focus for Changing Times

Our Three Essential Programs For Students: Lawyers 4 Literacy (year round) reaches hundreds of students each year For Teachers:

Middle School Mock Trial (Fall Semester) reaches almost 1,000 students each year Justice Teaching Institute (Summer)

Our Present Partnerships: For Students: Camp Confidence with Cary Police School Resource Officers For Teachers: Teachers Law School with American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA) Possible Future Partnership: For Students and Teachers:

Summer Law Camp with Carolina Center for Civic Education & NC Advocates for Justice

Renewed Emphasis: LRE has a volunteer data base or Speaker Bureau, if you will, for those that would like to speak in classrooms, community centers or organizations that hold learning forums. We are asking for a call to action for increased sign-ups for these opportunities so that the legal presence will be increased in all the counties in North Carolina. More information will be coming on this through NCBA social media and e-bar.

Visit our website to view inspiring videos, learn more, and to sign up: http://www.ncbar.org/public-resources/law-education

LRE Advisory Committee Co-Chairs 2015-2017 (2 year terms) Lucy Austin – [email protected] Doug McClanahan – [email protected]

LRE Department Contact: Diane Wright – LRE Director – 919-657-1588 – [email protected]

Looking for a FUN and REWARDING way to give back LRE is the place. From classroom presentations, scoring or coaching for mock trial, reading to struggling elementary students or helping teachers understand the rule of law in new ways, LRE has a variety of ways you can have a true impact across the state.

119

LUNCH WITH A LAWYER – ARTICLES AND EXAMPLES Pages: 120-129

120

121

LUNCH WITH A LAWYER MARKS ITS 17TH YEAR WITH

JUDGE HOWARD MANNING Judge Howard E. Manning, Jr., spoke of his summers when he was a teenager to about 200 students participating the Raleigh Youth Employment program on August 12, 2011, at 9:00 o’clock a.m. at Method Pioneer Building, 514 Method Road, Raleigh. The Wake County Bar Association’s longest running public service program, Lunch with a Lawyer, celebrated its finale with the judge with more than two hundred students who complete their employment with the city of Raleigh this summer. Judge Manning has drawn national attention on his recent decision to strike down budgetary limits put on at-risk children by the legislature. In the history making decision, Judge said, “This case is about the individual right of every child to have the equal opportunity to obtain a sound basic education.” He said, “The constitutional right belongs to the child, not to the adults.” The decision upset many. Also it delighted many who put their faith in education of children. Judge Manning recalled his experience at farms during the summer –summer work without pay that his father recommended him to do. He told the youths that they were lucky to get a paying job. He told the kids to grab a book instead of cell phones and TVs. Learn the multiplication table. Don’t rely on calculators which can sometimes fool you. Once you are addicted to using it you will never be able to add and multiply without it. Your head becomes useless. If you can read a page you are

122

well set to take those tests to get ahead. He told them to be aware of their constitutional rights and guard them. If cops come to you without a warrant and search your house you better know that you have constitutional rights to be free from unreasonable search and seizure. So children have right to a solid basic education wherever they are. If you ever become a principal do not wear high heels that may break your legs. If you are a good principal you need to walk a lot. Walking shoes will do the job for a busy principal. Respect any jobs—poll climber, electrician, plumbers…. “Jobs are sacred,” he said. Go to community colleges. Learn skills that pay. Do not come to his courtrooms to plead guilty. Grab any book and read. You can avoid coming to criminal court to plead guilty by reading a book. Judge Manning was humorous for the most of his talk lasting about thirty minutes. Children aged from 14 to 19 laughed a lot during the lively talk. The Lunch with a Lawyer is in its seventeenth year. It started in the summer of 1995. Paul Suhr, who chaired Raleigh Human Resources and Human Relations Commission, introduced the program to Wake County Bar Association. He saw too many youths milling in and out of the criminal court system. He thought that they all lacked a role model. We are all influenced at one time in our lives by casual encounter with a person–be it a family member, teacher, counselor, friend or stranger. At an informal setting at a lunch judges and lawyers want to serve as a role model for the youths. The bar recruits each year one hundred and twenty lawyers including prosecutors and judges and match them with the young employees of the Raleigh

123

Summer Youth Employment program. The city’s employment program is an extension of CETA– its continuing goal being providing city’s assigned-at-risk youths with an opportunity for employment. The Lunch with a Lawyer is an informal mentorship program. It aims to create a role model for assigned-at-risk youths signed up for the summer. At least it has provided an opportunity for the youths to meet with a professional. It now has two thousand alumni which includes at least one Assistant District Attorney of Wake County and many other professionals. Its past speakers on the occasion include Chief Justices Burley Mitchell and Henry Frye, Chief Judge Sid Eagles, former Senator John Edwards, Associate Justices Mark Martin and Patricia Timmons Goodson, Judges Robert Hunter, Wanda Bryant, Cheri Beasley and Paul Ridgeway, Wake County District Attorney Colon Willoughby, and Congressman G. K. Butterfield. Another star speaker from Raleigh in the past included Chief Justice Burley Mitchell who authored the Leandro v. State decision which held among other things: right to education provided in state constitution is qualitative and encompasses right to sound basic education preparing students to participate and compete in society; and equal educational opportunities clause of state constitution does not require substantially equal funding or educational advantages in all school districts. Judge Manning has been the trial judge in the case. More than ten years ago at another Lunch with a Lawyer event Chief Justice Mitchell impressed the youths with his arm full of tattoos and his story of life time relationship with a fellow marine

124

whom he met during the Vietnamese war and who happens to be black. He confessed to the youths that he killed lots of time in his youth at the corner of Martin Street hanging out with his buddies doing absolutely nothing. Finally he decided to join the Marine and shape up. He was the District Attorney of Wake County before he joined the North Carolina Supreme Court. Chief Justice Mitchell wrote the original Leandro decision. Like the author of Leandro decision Judge Manning is also a native of Raleigh. His grandmother used to call him Howdy. Still some people call him Howdy. Judge Manning got his law degree from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1968. He served in the U. S. Navy. He was appointed to the bench by the Republican Governor Martin. He presided in cases spread over 54 counties in the State. He likes to talk to students. He talked to students about how not to get into trouble and what a fun and privilege it is to be in school. At noon 118 students shared lunch with some of the lawyers at the finale at the stadium. Shown in the photos.

125

Lunch with a Lawyer

126

127

128

129

BARCARES – FAQ SHEET, SERVICES SUMMARY, FORMS Pages: 130-138

BarCARES

® Program Coordinator | 1.800.640.0735 or www.BarCARES.org

BarCARES can make a difference for Judicial District & Local Bar Members! BarCARES is a confidential short-term counseling, coaching and crisis intervention program created as a cost-free way of helping attorneys locate assistance to deal with the problems that might be causing stress. BarCARES is provided cost-free to members of bar groups that establish a BarCARES program. A number of judicial district and local bars, law schools and other bar related groups across the state have already chosen to offer this program. BarCARES of North Carolina, Inc, (BCNC) is a nonprofit corporation that works to expand the program to attorneys throughout North Carolina, and it monitors the overall BarCARES program operation. BarCARES, endorsed by the North Carolina Bar Association, is made possible by funding from bar groups that establish a BarCARES program, BCNC, the North Carolina Bar Association and its Foundation, and Lawyers Insurance Agency. BarCARES can be used for problems such as: Personal Issues • crisis intervention • depression and anxiety • substance abuse (drug or alcohol) • financial concerns • career counseling

Family Issues • marriage or relationship issues • children or adolescents • parenting • family conflict

Work Functions • professional stressors • course related stress • conflict resolution

BarCARES provides members of established programs in judicial districts, bar associations, law schools and organizations up to three free visits each year. In some programs the visits may be available to family members. Contact the BarCARES Program Coordinator for information about which BarCARES services are available to you. BarCARES Initiative extends a statewide program offer to any member of the NCBA who lives in an area where BarCARES is not yet available. This is a one-time benefit of three sessions under the program. You may contact the BarCARES Coordinator for information about which BarCARES services are available to you. BarCARES sessions can be used to provide assistance in resolving problems or accessing the appropriate source of help. Sometimes three sessions will be enough to take care of a problem. If it looks like the problem may require a longer term solution, the initial visits may be used to help identify the problem, to develop goals and a plan, and to access an appropriate resource, often covered under your health insurance plan. Every effort will be made for you to see a counselor who is also an approved provider under your group insurance in the event you wish to continue after the program visits are used. BarCARES is a confidential program, no one will know if you access the program but you and anyone you choose to tell. The counselors who are part of the program are licensed professionals, bound by the confidentiality requirements of their professions. Participating bars provide the funds to pay for the program and receive statistical utilization reports, but have no access to names or other identifying information of any program users. BarCARES program benefits are accessed by contacting the BarCARES Program Coordinator at HRC Behavioral Health & Psychiatry, PA, at 1.800.640.0735. You may also contact the BarCARES Program Coordinator just to ask questions about the program and the services it provides.

confidential counseling for the legal community and their families 1-800-640-0735 | barcares.ncbar.org

130

BarCARES

® Program Coordinator | 1.800.640.0735 or www.BarCARES.org

BarCARES Frequently Asked Questions Q. Who do I call with questions, to access my free BarCARES counseling sessions or with urgent concerns? A. Urgent calls will be received by a BarCARES service representative at HRC Behavioral Health & Psychiatry, PA, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. (800) 640-0735. You can call with questions about BarCARES or access your three free annual BarCARES counseling sessions by calling the confidential BarCARES assistance line (800) 640-0735 during business hours to speak to the BarCARES Program Coordinator or leave a confidential voice mail. Following the call, the BarCARES service representative will work to arrange an initial session between you and a BarCARES counseling provider in your local area, unless you prefer a provider outside your local area. Subsequent BarCARES counseling sessions are arranged directly between you and your BarCARES counseling provider, and can be used to resolve problems or determine how to access other sources of help. Q. Who pays for my BarCARES counseling sessions? A. Three annual BarCARES counseling sessions are provided at no cost to you by funding provided by your participating bar group membership or law school. The North Carolina Bar Association and Lawyers Insurance Agency fund administrative fees for the program. None of these groups have access to names or other identifying information of any program user. If your judicial district bar or local voluntary bar has not yet begun participating in the BarCARES program, as of July 2013 the North Carolina Bar Association BarCARES Initiative program offers a one-time, three session assessment/ referral to any NCBA member who resides in a non-covered BarCARES area and has never utlilized BarCARES services previously. The North Carolina Bar Association BarCARES Initiative is jointly funded with an annual grant from North Carolina Bar Association and Lawyers Insurance Agency. Q. May my family use my BarCARES counseling sessions? A. Some bar groups have chosen a plan that allows immediate family members to use one or all of their three cost-free annual BarCARES counseling sessions. The BarCARES service representative will let you know if your specific bar group allows family members to participate. Please note that the North Carolina Bar Association BarCARES Initiative is for attorneys only and does not cover family members. Q. How is BarCARES different from the North Carolina State Bar Lawyer Assistance Program? A. All BarCARES contact is made through HRC Behavioral Health & Psychiatry, PA, the organization administering the BarCARES program. The three annual BarCARES counseling sessions are free. To find out about the State Bar LAP program visit www.nclap.org.

confidential counseling for the legal community and their families 1-800-640-0735 | barcares.ncbar.org

131

HRC Behavioral Health & Psychiatry, PA Specialists in Evaluation, Treatment, and Consultation Since 1965 BarCARES of North Carolina A Personal Assistance Program for Attorneys UTILIZATION REPORT December 30, 2015 Report Period January 1, 2015 – December 30, 2015

INTRODUCTION BarCARES of North Carolina, Inc. officially began on January 1, 2000. The program's goals are to provide problem clarification, crisis management, and brief counseling. A separate goal has been to help attorneys access problem-solving resources for themselves, their families, and their co-workers through a positively viewed gateway. Since the program began in January of 2000, services have been provided to 1,842 different individuals. The 29 participating legal groups, schools and associations are: Craven County, Orange County, McDowell County, Union County and Judicial District Bars 1, 2, 3a,3b 1, 4, 5, 8, 10, 11a, 11b, 12, 14, 15A, 18, 19A 2, 21 and 28. Also included are the District Court Judges and the Eastern Bankruptcy Institute. Law Schools in the program include: Campbell, Charlotte, Elon, NCCU, UNC and Wake Forest. The NCBA Paralegal Division participates in BarCARES Plus. The NCBA BarCARES Statewide Initiative program has been in place for three years for individuals who are members of the NCBA, and live in areas not served by a participating BarCARES Judicial District bar association or local voluntary bar association, and who have never before used BarCARES. The NCBA BarCARES Statewide Initiative program benefit increased to three sessions as of July 1, 2013. For the fiscal year (July 1- June 30) 2013-14 seventeen attorneys accessed the Statewide Initiative for 45 sessions and during 2014-15 six attorneys used the Statewide initiative for 15 sessions. Since the beginning of the 2015- 2016 fiscal year on July 1, 2015 twelve attorneys have accessed the Statewide Initiative for 30 sessions. (Figure 5 Demographic Breakdown of NCBA BarCARES Statewide Initiative program users) PROGRAM USE THIS YEAR TO DATE During the 2015 calendar year, 284 NCBA members or eligible family members have accessed the program; 260 attorneys in the BarCARES program, six in the Paralegal Division, and eighteen 3 in the NCBA Initiative program. One hundred sixty attorneys were repeat users from prior years. (In the corresponding period of 2014 there were 273 program users of whom 154 were repeat users.) Those who have used the program in the past continue to return when they need it again. The 284 program users accessed the program for a total of 685 sessions for a mean number of 2.39 sessions each. Utilizing July 2015 NCBA active membership for enrolled associations, this yields an annualized referral rate of 1.64%. (In the corresponding period of 2014, 273 program users accessed 1 2 3

3B Judicial District Bar opt-in December 2015 (will absorb Craven Co Bar in 2016) 19A Judicial District Bar opt-in September 2015 State Bar Initiative program FY 2015Jan-June(6)+ July-Dec(12)

1

132

the program for a total of 624 sessions for a mean number of 2.28 sessions each yielding an annualized referral rate of 1.60.) Demographic information about program users is reported in the statistical section. (Figures 2 and 3) The predominant users of this program continued to be the attorney members. January1 – December 30, 2015 annualized utilization rate by local Bar Association is broken down below: Craven County Bar Association Orange County Bar Association McDowell County Bar Association Union County Bar Association 1st Judicial District Bar (Dare) 2nd Judicial District 3a Judicial District (Pitt) 3b Judicial District 4th Judicial District 5th Judicial District (New Hanover/Pender) 8th Judicial District 10th Judicial District (Wake) 11A Judicial District (Harnett, Lee) 11B Judicial District (Johnston) 12th Judicial District (Cumberland) 14th Judicial District (Durham) 15A Judicial District (Alamance County) 18th Judicial District (G-HP) 19A Judicial District (Cabarrus) 21st Judicial District (Forsyth) 28th Judicial District (Buncombe) Campbell University Law School Charlotte School of Law Elon University School of Law NCCU Law School UNC School of Law Wake Forest University School of Law District Court Judges Eastern Bankruptcy Institute BarCARESPLUS Paralegal Division 4

.53% 12.50% 0.00% .50% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% .43% 0.13% 0.00% 2.49% 1.15% 0.00% 0.51% 1.71% 1.97% 2.89% 0.00% 0.41% .66% 3.59% .44% 0.71% 0.16% 1.08% 0.79% 0.50% 0.00%

program users: program users: program users program users program users: program users: program users: program users: program users program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users: program users:

1 9 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 134 2 0 2 22 4 38 0 5 5 17 5 2 1 8 4 2 0

.39%

program users:

6

NCBA BarCARES 2015-16 Statewide Initiative 5 .14%

program users:

12

The number of eligible participants covered by the program has grown from just less than 3000 in the first program year in 2000 to over 18,000 in 2015 6. The program’s utilization rate is at 1.64% through for the fiscal year 2015. (During the corresponding quarters of 2014 annualized utilization was 1.67%) In areas where the program is well-developed and has existed for a number of years the higher local utilization rate is offset by lower utilization rate of some newer and smaller bars.

4January

2014 BarCARESPlus Member number (1,516) 2015 NCSB active attorneys in JD not opted in BarCARES number (8,444), FY 2015-16 July-June 6July 2015: NCBC opted in JD and BA (13,503)+Law Students(3,002)+Paralegal Div. (1,516). Also eligible, not included in total, NCBC Statewide Initiative (8,444). 5July

2

133

From July 1, 2015 through December 30, 2015, the NCBA BarCARES Statewide Initiative has provided services to attorneys in seven Judicial District Bars (7th,15B, 19B,19C, 25th, 26th and 29th) not “opted-in” to the BarCARES program. During the previous full fiscal year completed June 30, 2015 the Statewide Initiative served attorneys in four Judicial District Bar not “opted-in” to the BarCARES program The distribution of referral problems has remained consistent from year to year. FIGURES SECTION: Figure 1: Number of Referrals to the Counseling Program by Fiscal Year Fiscal Year

Number of Referrals

Repeat Users

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

73 74 84 76 106 135 117 130 170 203 241 284 310 310 286

0 18 18 21 27 42 41 27 45 70 92 83 132 155 156

2015

284

160

Figure 2: Breakdown of Referrals by Demographics

7 8

A. Breakdown by gender:

Males Females

B. Breakdown by member relationship:

Attorney User Spouse User Child User

48% of users 52% of users 92.3% 3.5% 7 3.8% 8

This does not reflect the fact that spouses may have been present with the primary user This does not reflect the fact that a child or children may have been present with the primary user

3

134

Figure 3: Problems of Service Users (N = 266) Problem Type

# Reporting Problem as Primary

Total # Reported with Problem

% of Total Users

Personal Difficulties Depression/anxiety/stress Psycho-physiological distress

190

221

83.0%

Chemical Dependency Alcohol or drug dependence

13

22

8.2%

Relationship Difficulties Marital Problems Relationship Issues

19

43

16.2%

Family Problems Parenting Issues Caregiver issues Other child-related issues Childhood Problems

10

20

7.5%

Work-related difficulties Performance Workplace conflicts Work Stress Other Practice Issues

10

32

12.0%

Career Issues Job dissatisfaction

22

31

11.7%

Financial/Legal Issues

2

3

1.1%

266

366

139.7% 9

TOTALS

Figure 4: Type of Services Provided Number seen within the program …………………………….…. .260 Paralegal users seen within the program …………………………... 6 NCBC Initiative program (Jan 1 – December 15, 2015 users)……18 BarCARES provide contact to LAP

………………………....... 11

LAP refers client to BarCARES ……………………………………… 9

9

This number reflects the fact that users may report more than one problem

4

135

Figure 5: Demographic Breakdown of NCBA Statewide Initiative Program July1, 2015 – December 30, 2015 A. Three session NCBA Initiative Program July 1 through December 30, 2015 Judicial District # program users # sessions provided 2 4 7th JD

Total C

15B JD

2

6

19B JD

1

3

19C JD

1

1

25th JD

1

3

26th JD

4

12

1 12

1 30

29th JD seven JD

NCBA Initiative Program breakdown by gender:

Males Female

54.5% of users 45.4% of users

D. Problems of NCBC Initiative Program Service Users (N = 12 July 1, 2015 to December 30, 2015)

Problem Type

# Reporting Problem as Primary

Total # Reported with Problem

% of Total Users

Personal Difficulties Depression/anxiety/stress Psycho-physiological distress

7

8

66.6%

Chemical Dependency Alcohol or drug dependence

1

1

8.3%

Relationship Difficulties Marital Problems Relationship Issues

2

2

16.6%

Family Problems Parenting Issues Caregiver issues

1

2

16.6%

Work-related difficulties Performance/Work stress

0

1

8.3%

Career Issues Job dissatisfaction

0

0

0.0%

Financial Issues

1

1

8.3%

12

14

124.7% 10

TOTALS

10This

number reflects the fact that users may report more than one problem

5

136

CHEROKEE

POLK CLEVELAND

27B GASTON

27A

LINCOLN

CATAWBA

26 MECKLENBURG

20B

UNION

19A

CABARRUS

19C

ROWAN

DAVIE

RANDOLPH

GUILFORD

18

ANSON

9A

15B

SCOTLAND

MOORE

16B

12

8

PENDER

LENOIR

GREENE

DUPLIN

4

WAYNE

BRUNSWICK

SAMPSON

JOHNSTON

11B

COUNTIES TARGETED FOR FUTURE PROGRAMS

COLUMBUS

13

ONSLOW

JONES

PITT

3A

6

PASQU OTANK

CARTERET

CRAVEN

2

WASHINGTON

PAMLICO

1

HYDE

TYRRELL

DARE

CAMDEN

CURRITUCK

PERQUIMANS CHOWAN

GATES

BEAUFORT

MARTIN

BERTIE

HERTFORD

3B

NORTHAMPTON

EDGECOMBE

HALIFAX

WILSON

7

NASH

WARREN

FRANKLIN

9

VANCE

BLADEN

HARNETT

CUMBERLAND

11A

ROBESON

16A

HOKE

LEE

WAKE

10

GRANVILLE

DURHAM

14

PERSON

ORANGE

CHATHAM

15A

ALAMANCE

CASWELL

19D

RICHMOND

MONTGOMERY

19B

20A

STANLY

22B

DAVIDSON

17A ROCKINGHAM

NEW HANOVER

TRANSYLVANIA

29B

HENDERSON

RUTHERFORD

29A

McDOWELL

25

22A IREDELL

21

FORSYTH

STOKES

PARTICIPATING LAW SCHOOL

JACKSON

28

BUNCOMBE

BURKE

ALEXANDER

YADKIN

17B

5

MACON

30

HAYWOOD

YANCEY

CALDWELL

WILKES

23

SURRY

COUNTIES WITH BarCARES PROGRAMS

CLAY

GRAHAM

SWAIN

MADISON

24

MITCHELL AVERY

WATAUGA

ASHE

ALLEGHANY

BarCARES Statewide Implementation

137

BarCARES

® Program Coordinator | 1.800.640.0735 or www.BarCARES.org

BarCARES Program Groups BarCARES counseling services are available to members of the following bar groups: Judicial District & Local Bar Programs: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1st Judicial District Bar (Camden, Chowan, Currituck, Dare, Gates, Pasquotank & Perquimans Counties) 2nd Judicial District Bar (Beaufort, Hyde, Martin Tyrrell & Washington Counties) 3A Judicial District Bar & Pitt County Bar 3B Judicial District Bar (Carteret, Craven & Pamlico Counties) 4th Judicial District (Duplin, Jones, Onslow & Sampson Counties) 5th Judicial District Bar & New Hanover & Pender County Bars 8th Judicial District Bar (Greene, Lenoir & Wayne Counties) 10th Judicial District Bar & Wake County Bar 11A Judicial District Bar (Harnett & Lee Counties) 11B Judicial District Bar (Johnston County) 12th Judicial District Bar & Cumberland County Bar 14th Judicial District Bar & Durham County Bar 15A Judicial District Bar & Alamance County Bar 18th Judicial District Bar & Greensboro Bar (Guilford County) 19A Judicial District Bar (Cabarrus County) 21st Judicial District Bar (Forsyth County) 28th Judicial District Bar (Buncombe County) Orange County Bar McDowell County Bar Union County Bar

Law School Programs: • Campbell University • Charlotte School of Law • Elon University • North Carolina Central University • Wake Forest University • University of North Carolina Other Law Related Group Programs: •

North Carolina Bar Association Initiative (A one-time referral includes three sessions for NCBA members in a non-covered BarCARES area who have never used BarCARES)



North Carolina Bar Association’s Paralegal Division (BarCARES Plus Program)



North Carolina Association of District Court Judges



Eastern North Carolina Bankruptcy Institute – May Program Registrants

confidential counseling for the legal community and their families 1-800-640-0735 | barcares.ncbar.org

138

NORTH CAROLINA SPECIALTY BARS Page: 139-142

139

Winston-Salem Bar Assn (local organization)

John S. Leary Association

Capital City Lawyers Association

North Carolina Association of Black Lawyers Statewide Organization (no chapters)

Coastal Chapter

Johnston Chapter

Fayetteville Chapter

Western NC Chapter

Eastern NC Chapter

Durham/Orange Chapter

Durham/Orange Women's Bar (DOWA) Eastern North Carolina (ENC) Western North Carolina Women's Attorneys Fayetteville Women Attorneys (FWA) Johnston Women Attorneys (JWA) Coastal Women Attys (CWA)

Piedmont Triad Women Attorneys (PTWA) Mecklenburg Chapter Charlotte Women's Bar (CWB)

Piedmont Chapter

336.333.6400 704.604.4292

919.716.6500

919-957-0707

919.981.0191

Phone Number

[email protected] [email protected]

Dione Fortner Linda Dolan

Dionne Jenkins, Pres.

Gillian S. Crowl Kenneth D. Snow

Brian O. Beverly

[email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

Caitlin Young

Craigie Sanders, President Kaye Webb, Executive Director

[email protected]

Mindy Fisher

336.727.2509

646.522.9727 704.358.0026

919.782.6860

919.466.1259

919.934.4000 910.819.4768

910.486.9292

828.254.4778

[email protected] 252.565.8562

[email protected].com [email protected] 919.560.4158 nc.gov

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected] (li-day-juh) [email protected]

Email Address

Lisa Fitzpatrick

Sherri Zann Rosenthal

Nina Shor

Rachel Blunk

Cathy Jordan

Mallory Lidaka, President Felicia Young, Exec. Director

North Carolina Association of Women Attorneys, NCAWA

Wake Chapter Wake Women Attorneys

Contact Person

Name of Association

Specialty Bars Contact List

140

Georgia Hackus Lewis Judge Al Diaz

Hada Haulsee, Deputy Pres. Leticia Morales, Pres.

Region 6 of the Hispanic National Bar Association

Mecklenburg Chapter

Angela Haas, President

North Carolina Gay and Lesbian Attorneys, NCGALA

[email protected] [email protected]

336-721-3655 919-357-5573

[email protected] 919-783-9669

141

[email protected] [email protected]

Christopher R. Nichols, President Dick Taylor, CEO

North Carolina Association of Defense Attorneys, NCADA

North Carolina Advocates for Justice, NCAJ

Thomas Maher, Exec. Dir. [email protected]; Danielle Carman, Asst. [email protected] Dir.

UNC School of Government

Office of Indigent Defense Services

[email protected]; [email protected]

Ellen Bradley Director of Marketing & Communications John Rubin Alyson Grine, Defender Educator

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

David Hood, President Lynette Pitt, Executive Director

North Carolina Association of Public Defenders

George R. Hausen, Jr. Ken Schorr Jim Barrett

[email protected] [email protected]

Thomas K. Maher, President Alyson Grine, Defender Educator, UNC School of Government

Legal Aid of North Carolina Legal Services Southern Piedmont Pisgah Legal Services

[email protected] Annual Mtg in Wilmington; [email protected] Oct 21-23 .gov

Peg Dorer, Director Andrew Murray

Meeting Info.

North Carolina Conference of District Attorneys

Email Address

Contact Person

Name of Association

Specialty Organizations Contact List

919-354-7208

919-843-6527(w)

919-856-2130

919.915.0212 919-832-1413

828.322.7741 919-239-4463

919.354.7208 919-966-4248

919-621-5988 Cell 704.686.0700

Phone Number

142

NC Conference of Clerks of Superior Court

NC Attorney General Office (Department of Justice)

NC Association of District Court Judges

Conference of Superior Court Judges

NC Administrative Office of the Courts

Barbara Moore

Grayson Kelley Kristi Jones

Judge Osmond Smith, President Cindy Lee, SOG meeting

[email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

Patti Brooks, HR Compensation Manager [email protected]; Gail Adams , HRIS [email protected] Specialist Judge Jesse B. Caldwell III, President [email protected] Danielle Phillips, SOG meeting coordinator

919-609-2745

919-716-6400 919-716-0044

919-792-4800

336.459.4016

919-890-1104 919-890-1101

PUBLIC SERVICE AWARDS Pages: 143-146

Pro Bono Service Awards N.C. Bar Association Foundation William Thorp Pro Bono Service Award: Presented to an attorney who has provided exemplary legal services without a fee. Particular consideration is given to lawyers whose voluntary contributions have resulted in the increased access to legal services on the part of low-income people. Criteria: A lawyer who 1) practices in North Carolina; 2) is not employed on a full-time basis by an organization that has as its primary purpose the provision of free legal services to the poor; 3) has provided direct delivery of legal services with no expectation of receiving a fee to a client or client group that could not afford to employ compensated legal counsel and that those services are substantially in excess of the aspirational goals of Rule 6.1; and 4) has made significant voluntary contributions that have resulted in the increased access to legal services on the part of low-income people. Note that the nominee should have engaged in the direct delivery of legal services and in making significant voluntary contributions over an extended period of time and those efforts should be ongoing. Deborah Greenblatt Outstanding Legal Services Attorney Award: Presented to a legal services attorney who has made an exemplary contribution to the provision of legal assistance to help meet the needs of the poverty population in North Carolina. Criteria: A lawyer who is employed full time by a legal services program in North Carolina. Chief Justice Award: Recognizes a local, district or statewide bar organization whose members have performed outstanding legal services or have given outstanding support and assistance or maintenance of such programs for low-income people. Criteria: Any local, district or statewide bar organization in North Carolina. Outstanding Law Firm Pro Bono Service: There are two categories for law firm awards. Small & Medium Law Firms: Recognizes firms employing fewer than 30 attorneys for their commitment to the provision of pro bono service. Large Law Firms: Recognizes pro bono efforts in North Carolina from among law firms employing 30 or more attorneys in North Carolina. Criteria: Consideration will be given to a firm’s hours of service and/or percentage of “billable hours” devoted to pro bono work; number/percentage of attorneys providing pro bono legal services; creative approaches to encourage pro bono participation; and consistence of the firm’s efforts to provide pro bono assistance. Law Student Group Pro Bono Service Award: Presented to an outstanding law student group whose pro bono project benefits low-income people in North Carolina. Criteria: Consideration will be given to 1) a group project consisting of 2 or more students at a North Carolina law school; 2) who are not receiving law school academic credit for their work; and 3) providing assistance to low-income people in North Carolina. Younger Lawyer Pro Bono Service Award: Presented by the NCBA Young Lawyers Division to a younger lawyer who has made extraordinary contributions by providing exemplary legal services without a fee to persons of limited means or to charitable groups or organizations. Criteria: A lawyer who 1) practices in North Carolina and is 36 years of age or younger or in the first three years of practice; 2) is not employed on a full-time basis by a legal services organization; 3) has provided direct delivery of pro bono legal services; or 4) whose voluntary contributions have resulted in increased access to legal services on the part of low-income people in North Carolina.

143

nominations guidelines Background Information: In addition to completing the form below, for individual attorney nominations, please include a resume. For firms or bar associations, provide an introductory statement (no more than 200 words) including information about the firm’s/association’s size, primary officers and other descriptive information. For law student group projects, provide an introductory statement (no more than 200 words) including information about the student group or organization, its structure, including officers and other descriptive information. Narrative: Explain the nominee’s pro bono service and why the nominee should be selected for the particular award category. Pay careful attention to the category’s criteria. Give detailed information about the nature of the pro bono service and the effect it has had on the targeted group. Include any supporting data such as news articles, statistics, publications and similar documents. The written portion, excluding the supporting data, should be no longer than three pages. Letters of Support: Letters from individuals or organizations that support the candidate’s nomination should also be included. No more than three letters, please. If selected, you will be asked to provide a high resolution digital image of the recipient.

nominee data form Please print or type legibly. This form is also available at awards.ncbar.org. Nominations are due by 5 p.m. December 15, 2015. Please submit all nomination materials to Kim Bart Mullikin, NCBA Foundation. By mail: P.O. Box 3688 • Cary, NC 27519-3688. By email: [email protected] Please select the appropriate category:       

William Thorp Pro Bono Service Award Deborah Greenblatt Outstanding Legal Services Attorney Award Chief Justice Award Small & Medium Law Firm Pro Bono Service Award Large Law Firm Pro Bono Service Award Law Student Group Pro Bono Service Award Younger Lawyer Pro Bono Service Award

Name of Nominee: Nominee’s Title: Mailing Address: Phone Number: Email Address: Contact information for person submitting the nomination: Name: Mailing Address: Phone Number: Email Address:

144

Dr. I. Beverly Lake Public Service Award N.C. Bar Association Foundation The Dr. I. Beverly Lake Public Service Award recognizes an outstanding lawyer in North Carolina who has performed exemplary public service in his or her community. The voluntary service of this attorney may have occurred with a nonprofit organization or with a number of groups in the community as well as through elective or appointive office. Each year nominations are sought from throughout the legal community including judicial district and voluntary bars. This award is not given every year. All nominations will be referred to the Past Presidents’ Council as the selection committee, and the committee’s selection is subject to Board of Governors approval. The award recognition is made each year by the North Carolina Bar Association Foundation at the NCBA Annual Meeting in June. The honoree’s name is added to the Lake Public Service Award plaque at the North Carolina Bar Center in Cary and the honoree also receives an award plaque. In addition, the I. Beverly Lake Justice Fund awards an honorarium in the recipient’s name to the recipient’s choice of select NCBA programs, to help further their mission. Dr. Lake served from 1965-78 on the N.C. Supreme Court. He was a graduate of Wake Forest College and Harvard Law School and served as a professor at the Wake Forest Law School from 1932-52. He also served from 1952-55 as Assistant Attorney General for the State of North Carolina and engaged in private practice from 1955-65. His son, I. Beverly Lake Jr., followed his father into law and the judiciary, serving as Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 2001-06. Criteria: •

A member in good standing of the North Carolina State Bar and the North Carolina Bar Association.



A licensed attorney currently practicing or retired from the practice of law in North Carolina.



An attorney role model whose career exemplifies public service to the community in which he or she has practiced law.



An attorney whose public service has included significant involvement with one or more nonprofit organizations meeting an important community need; or whose public service has included substantial contributions to or involvement with any institution, foundation, cause, program or initiative benefiting the public.

Nominees for consideration also may have: •

Made significant contributions to North Carolina through appointive service or elected office.



Made significant voluntary contributions to the legal profession, to his or her law school or other legal institution.

recipients 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005

Alan Duncan, Greensboro W. Louis Bissette Jr., Asheville Sen. Peter S. Brunstetter, Winston-Salem Larry J. Dagenhart, Charlotte Phillip R. Dixon Sr., Greenville George V. Hanna III, Charlotte Edmund I. Adams, Sparta H. Parks Helms, Charlotte James B. Maxwell, Durham James F. Morgan, High Point Murray C. Greason Jr., Winston-Salem

145

Dr. I. Beverly Lake Public Service Award N.C. Bar Association Foundation

nominations guidelines Background Information: In addition to completing the form below, please include the nominee’s current resume and other relevant background information, including pertinent family information as appropriate. Narrative: Describe the nominee’s commitment to public service in terms of the criteria described in the award. Include information that describes the depth and breadth of the nominee’s commitment to public service, work on specific projects or ways that the nominee has improved the quality of his or her community. Include any supporting data such as news articles, statistics, publications and similar documentation. The written portion of the nomination, excluding the supporting data, should be no longer than three pages. Letters of Support: Letters from individuals or organizations that support the candidate’s nomination should be included. No more than five letters, please. If selected, you will be asked to provide a high resolution digital image of the recipient.

nominee data form Please type or print legibly. This form is available at awards.ncbar.org. Nominations are due by 5 p.m. December 15, 2015. Please submit all nomination materials to Kim Bart Mullikin, NCBA Foundation. By mail: P.O. Box 3688 • Cary, NC 27519-3688. By email: [email protected] Name of Nominee: Nominee’s Title: Mailing Address: Phone Number: Email Address: Contact information for person submitting the nomination: Name: Mailing Address: Phone Number: Email Address:

146

N.C. BAR FOUNDATION – GRANT INFORMATION/FORMS Pages: 147-150

NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION FOUNDATION ENDOWMENT GRANT APPLICATION FORM P. O. Box 3688, Cary, NC 27519 – www.ncbar.org ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Grant cycle for which funds are requested:

 January l - June 30, _____  July l - December 3l, _____

Please indicate which of the following objectives and purposes of the Foundation most accurately describes your request for Endowment funding:  To study, improve and facilitate the administration of justice;  To build respect for and understanding of the law;  To enhance the professional competence of lawyers;  To support the delivery of legal services to eligible indigent communities; or  To support legally-related community service projects.

1.

Name of Organization/Applicant: _____________________________________________________ Mailing Address: __________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip: ____________________________________________________________________

2.

Contact's Name: __________________________________________________________________ Title: ____________________________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________ E-mail Address: ___________________________________________________________________ Telephone Number: ________________________FAX Number: ___________________________

3.

Project Name: ________________________________4. Grant Amount Requested:____________

5.

General Description of Project: ______________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________

6.

Purpose, Scope & Desirability of Project (include schedule of events, location & description of intended audience): ________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ ____

147

7.

Expected Completion Date of Project: ________________________________________________

8.

Total Cost of Project: $_____________________________________________________________

9.

Describe how you will determine the success of this project: (e.g. measurable outcomes, number of people served, etc.):

________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary. 10.

Other Funds Pledged or On Hand: SOURCE

AMOUNT

____________________________________________

_________________________________

____________________________________________

________________________________

Attached additional pages if necessary

11.

On a separate page, please submit a line-item budget to include administrative costs, such as personnel, supplies, print and mailing expenses, etc., identifying anticipated expenses of the project.

12.

If the Organization/Applicant has been accorded tax-exempt status, please submit the Federal I.D. Number: _____________________. Attach a copy of the determination letter from the Internal Revenue Service.

If granted funds by the Foundation, the undersigned, on behalf of the above-named organization agrees to render faithful efforts to carry out the activities described in this application, and further agrees to furnish semiannual status reports to the Foundation by April 30 and October 3l until the conclusion of the project. If necessary, you will need to request semi-annual extensions with your status report. Authorized Signature: _________________________________________________________ Title: ______________________________________________________________________ Date Submitted: _____________________________________________________________ For additional information regarding eligibility for Endowment Funds, please contact the Director of Development - NC Bar Association Foundation - P.O. Box 3688 - Cary, NC 27519 or call the North Carolina Bar Center at (9l9) 677-056l or 1 (800) 662-7407 Application Deadlines are April 30 and October 3l

148

North Carolina Bar Association Foundation ENDOWMENT GRANT APPLICATION FORM P.O. Box 3688, Cary, NC 27519 • www.ncbar.org

Grant cycle for which funds are requested:



January 1 – June 30, 20_____

 July 1 – December 31, 20_____ Please indicate which of the following objectives and purposes of the Foundation most accurately describes your request for Endowment funding (check only one):

 To study, improve and facilitate the administration of justice;  To build respect for and understanding of the law;  To enhance the professional competence of lawyers;

 To support legally related community service projects;

or  To support the delivery of legal services to eligible indigent communities

Application Instructions and Deadlines: 1. Applications must be received by April 30 to be considered by the Endowment Committee in the spring, and by October 31 to be considered in the fall. 2. Applications (and attached documents) should be submitted in a single-sided format (no double-sided or front/back documents). 3. Applications, correspondence, etc., should be mailed to the attention of: Thomas M. Hull, Director of Development, N.C. Bar Association Foundation, P.O. Box 3688, Cary, NC 27519 4. When funding is requested for projects involving the printing and distribution of publications of any type (books, brochures, pamphlets, etc.), a sample or mock-up should accompany the application. 5. When a group submits more than one application for consideration within the same grant period, its group leader must submit a prioritized list of requests for each submission ranging from the most important to the least important. You will be contacted if additional information is needed, and notified of the status of your application after review by the NCBA Foundation Endowment Committee and approval by the NCBAF Board of Directors in June (Spring applicants) or January (Fall applicants).

1.

Name of Organization: _____________________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip: _____________________________________________________________________________________________

2.

Contact’s Name: __________________________________________________________________________________________ Title: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ E-mail: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone: ________________________________________________________ FAX: _________________________________

3.

Project Name: _____________________________________________________ 4. Grant Amount Requested: $_____________ (Form continues on next page)

149

(Continued from previous page) 5.

General Description of Project: _______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary.

6.

Purpose, Scope and Desirability of Project (include schedule of events, location and description of intended audience): ____________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary.

7.

Expected Completion Date of Project: _________________________________________________________________________

8.

Total Cost of Project: $____________________________________________________________________________________

9.

Describe how you will determine the success of this project (e.g. measurable outcomes, number of people served, etc.): ___________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary.

10. Other Funds Pledged or On Hand: SOURCE

AMOUNT

_________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________ Attach additional pages if necessary. 11. On a separate page, please submit a project line-item budget to include administrative costs, such as personnel, supplies, print and mailing expenses, etc., identifying anticipated expenses of the project. 12. If the Organization/Applicant has been accorded tax-exempt status, please submit the Federal I.D. number: _______________ Attach a copy of the determination letter from the Internal Revenue Service.

If granted funds by the Foundation, the undersigned, on behalf of the above-named organization, agrees to render faithful efforts to carry out the activities described in this application, and further agrees to furnish semi-annual status reports to the Foundation by April 30 and October 31 until the conclusion of the project. If necessary, you will need to request semi-annual grant extensions with your status reports. Authorized Signature: __________________________________________________________________________________________ Title: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date Submitted: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ For additional information regarding eligibility for Endowment Funds, please contact: Director of Development • North Carolina Bar Association Foundation • P.O. Box 3688 • Cary, North Carolina 27519 or call the North Carolina Bar Center at (919) 677-0561 or 1 (800) 677-0761.

APPLICATION DEADLINES are APRIL 30 and OCTOBER 31. 150

NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION – COMPOSITE LIST OF AWARDS Pages: 151-157

DESCRIPTION

Liberty Bell Award

Peace Award

GP Hall of Fame

1/30/2015

(not always annual award)

December 15 each year

The North Carolina Bar Association Dispute Resolution Section recognizes an individual in North Carolina who has made a special commitment to the peaceful resolution of disputes. Section members make the nominations. General Practice Hall of Fame lawyers should be outstanding members of the legal profession whose careers have served as models for lawyers in the general practice of law. To be eligible for nomination, lawyers must have practiced law for at least 25 years, have a significant portion of that time devoted to the general practive of law, be living at the time of nomination and be members in good standing ofthe N.C. State Bar. Section members make the nominations.

http://www.ncbar.org/media/261145/n cba-general-practice-hall-of-fameaward-application.pdf

No Application required.

This Award is to honor a person who has http://ncbar.org/media/382722/crdemonstrated extraordinary commitment to award-form.pdf the ideals embodied in the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of North Carolina. Section members make the nominations. The recipient of the award should be an individual who exemplifies lifelong service to the law in North Carolina. NCBA Membership submits Nominations.

LINK

NCBA Awards List

The CLE Volunteer of the Year Award was established to recognize the exceptional contributions of the individual who contributed most significantly to producing CLE Volunteer of the and/or providing quality continuing legal education for the North Carolina legal Year community in a given fiscal year. Anyone can nominate a speaker or planner for the award which is presented in January.

TITLE

John McNeill Smith Jr. Constitutional Rights 12/19/2014 & Responsibilities Section Award

April 1 each year

CLOSING DATE

151

[email protected]

[email protected]

EMAIL

Julianne Dambro [email protected]

Jacquelyn Terrell [email protected]

Coleta Bell

Catherine Peglow

CONTACT

Solo, Small Firm & Jeremy Wiiliams [email protected] GP Section

Dispute Resolution Section Nominations Committee

Liberty Bell Subcommittee: YLD

Constitutional Rights & Responsibilities Law Section

CLE Committee

COMMITTEE/ SECTION

Dec 15 each year

12/15/2014

Closes March 15, 2012

http://www.ncbar.org/media/398009/a dvocates-award.pdf

Lake Family Public Service Award

Litigation Section Julianne Dambro [email protected] Award Committee

The Lake Family Public Service Award http://www.ncbar.org/media/261113/n annually recognizes an outstanding lawyer in cba-foundation-lake-awardNorth Carolina who has performed application.pdf exemplary public service in his or her community. The voluntary service of this attorney may have occurred with a non-profit organization or with a number of groups in the community as well as through elective or appointive office.

Past President's Council

Past President's Council

[email protected]

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

Allan Head

This award will honor a Paralegal that has http://www.ncbar.org/about/communic actively participated in paralegal activities ations/awards.aspx such as civic/community volunteering, paralegal leadership, paralegal education, Paralegal Division and promotion of the paralegal profession Awards Jeremy Williams [email protected] during the nomination period. Award is given Committee at PD Annual Meeting. Section members make the nominations.

This award will honor a Paralegal who has http://www.ncbar.org/about/communic excelled at providing Pro Bono service to the ations/awards.aspx Paralegal Division community. Section members make the Awards Jeremy Williams [email protected] nominations. Committee

The Advocate’s Award was created to recognize “superstars” of the Litigation Section and of our profession.

The purpose of this Award is to honor the http://www.ncbar.org/media/261049/n memory and the accomplishments of Judge cba-john-j-parker-awardParker and to encourage the emulation of application.pdf his deep devotion and enduring contribution Judge John J. Parker to the law and to the administration of justice by recognizing conspicuous service by Award members of the Bar of this State to the cause of jurisprudence in North Carolina. Does not accept nominations.

Distinguished Paralegal Award

NominationsMarch The Advocate's Award Closed May 15, 2012 Award varies/not Outstanding always Achievement Pro annual Bono Award award

152

2/20/2015

Outstanding Achievement Pro Bono Award

Individual and Firm Awards. The outstanding http://intellectualpropertylaw.ncbar.or individual achievement award and firm g/media/2280597/outstandingachieve award will be given to at least one IP Section mentprobonoaward.pdf member and a firm who has actively participated in pro bono activities such as direct indigent representation or direct community service efforts (excluding support of professional/business organizations such as bar associations, chambers of commerce, etc.). Section members make the nominations.

2 months prior to 5/4/2012

Varies

Not awarded every year, it is within the 2 respective Leaderships to determine if they want to gather nominations during a said year; therefore, no set deadline

Honors an outstanding Government or http://ncbar.org/media/78191/Grainge Public Sector Attorney as an exemplar of the r-Barrett-Award.pdf The Grainger Barrett excellence, dedication and passion for Award For Excellence justice of North Carolina's Government and Public Sector Attorneys. Section members make the nominations.

The award recognizes those persons who perform services for the Family Law Section in ofer to encourage greater participation. Family Law: Criteria of abve and beyond what would Distinguished Service normally be expected or them, or who Award contribues substantially to the Family Law Practice. Section members make the nominations.

The award recognizes distinguished service Link changes each year with the Education Law Bar in the following uploading of new yearly Nomination areas: Teaching; Publishing; Professional form Varies each Ann L. Majestic activities [leadership and volunteerism] and year; Distinguished Service Practice/Litigation. More specifics with the No Award award nomination. Section members make Nominations the nominations.

The award recognizes attorneys who http://www.ncbar.org/media/261191/n demonstrate the “Renaissance Lawyer” cba-mcknight-award-application.pdf qualities embodied by Judge McKnight, including integrity, enthusiasm for intellectual H. Brent McKnight achievement, commitment to civility, the Dec 15 each Renaissance Lawyer pursuit of excellence and service.  year Award Nominations are from the various sections, committees and individual members of the North Carolina Bar Association.

153

Government & Public Sector Section

Council Nominations Committee

Education Law Section Distinguished Service Award Committee

Professionalism Committee

Intellectual Property Law Section

[email protected]

Coleta Bell

[email protected]

Jacquelyn Terrell [email protected]

Julianne Dambro

[email protected]

Russell Rawlings [email protected]

Coleta Bell

Real Property: For Exemplary Service

Young Lawyers Division: Charles F. Blanchard Young Lawyer of the Year

N/A

N/A

Varies

N/A

3/23/2015

N/A: The Charles F. Blanchard Young Lawyer of the Year does not take nominations.

The Executive Committee selects an outstanding member to recognize when appropriate. Does not accept nominations.

Recognizes lifelong achievement and outstanding contributions to health law, and Health Law Section exemplary service to health care Distinguished Service professional, the bar and the general public. Award (Not given every year) Section members make the nominations. Honors exemplary service and leadership in The John Dortch the advancement of International Law. (Not International Service given every year) Section members make Award the nominations. Award recognizes significant contributions to Juv. Justice & juvenile justice and children's rights in North Children's Rights: Carolina. The award is open to any person Bertha "B" Holt or group, including non attorneys. Section Distinguished Sevice members make the nominations. Award

On going

To improve the image of lawyers by recognizing the civic contributions of Centennial Awards individual lawyers. Local Bars present this award to attorneys for community service No deadline efforts. Citizen lawyers formally recognizes lawyers who provide exemplary service to their communities in a variety of ways, including public service in local or state government in elected or appointed positions, coaching Dec 15 each Citizen Lawyer Awards youth sports teams or serving as tutors or year mentors to young people, and volunteering or serving as board members for non-profit or community organizations. Anyone can nominate an attorney for this award.

154

http://ncbar.org/media/261097/ncbacitizen-lawyer-award-application.pdf

http://www.ncbar.org/about/communic ations/awards.aspx

N/A

N/A

Not awarded every year, it is within the 2 respective Leaderships to determine if they want to gather nominations during a said year; therefore, no set deadline

N/A

N/A Coleta Bell

[email protected]

[email protected]

Jeremy Wiiliams [email protected]

Coleta Bell

Citizen Lawyer Task Force

Local Bar Services

David Bohm

David Bohm

[email protected]

[email protected]

YLD Nominating Jacquelyn Terrell [email protected] Committee

Council's Executive Committee

Council Nominations Committee

International Law Julianne Dambro [email protected] & Practice Section

Health Law Section

The Johnathan R. Harkavy Award

Varies

October

Recognizes outstanding service, leadership No Application required. and significant contributions to Labor and Employment Law in North Carolina. Award is determined by the LL Council. Section members make the nominations.

Recognizes outstanding service, leadership No application required. and signigicant contributions to Zoning, Planning and Land Use law in North Carolina.

Awards to honor a prosecutor and a defense No link. Peter S. Gilchrist, III attorney whose careers exemplify the and Wade M. Smith highest ideals of the profession. Nominations made by the section council. Awards

The Award of Excellence

Varies

12/15/14

This Award was established to recognize N/A members of the ATR Section (or others under extraordinary situations) who (1) have demonstrated the highest ethical standards; (2) have shown a high level of professional The Antitrust & Trade competence; and (3) have made significant Regulation Section's contributions (a) to the ATR Section, (b) to Distinguished Service scholarship in the fields of antitrust or trade Award regulation law, and/or (c) to advocacy on behalf of clients, consumers, or the public in the fields of antitrust or trade regulation. This Award will be given by the section every other year. Section members make the nominations.

April, date varies

Paralegal Division Presented to an outstanding NC paralegal Student Scholarship student. Section members make the nominations. Award

No current link.

Recognizes outstanding service, leadership No Application required. Lifetime Achievment and contributions to Bankruptcy Law in North November Award Carolina. Award is determined by BK Recognizes outstanding service, leadership http://ncbar.org/members/awardsand contributions to Construction Law in recognition/ September, Evelyn Coman Award North Carolina. Award is determined by CO varies Council

155

Coleta Bell

[email protected]

Julianne Dambro

Julianne Dambro

Julianne Dambro

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Julianne Dambro Paralegal Division Awards Jeremy Williams [email protected] Committee

Construction Law Section

Bankruptcy Section

Labor & Employment Law Section

Zoning, Planning and Land Use Section

Criminal Justice Section Executive Jacquelyn Terrell [email protected] Committee

Antitrust & Trade Regulation

Mentor of the Year Award

February 1st

February 1st

Recognizes firms employing fewer than 30 Small & Medium Law attorneys for their commitment to the Firms Pro Bono Award provision of pro bono service.

Chief Justice Award

February 1st

Presented to a legal services attorney who has made an exemplary contribution to the provision of legal assistance to help meet the needs of the poverty population in North Carolina. Recognizes a local, district or statewide bar organization whose members have performed outstanding legal services or have given outstanding support and assistance to the activation or maintenance of such programs for low-income people.

http://www.ncbar.org/media/362401/n cba-foundation-pro-bono-awardapplication.pdf

http://www.ncbar.org/media/362401/n cba-foundation-pro-bono-awardapplication.pdf

http://www.ncbar.org/media/362401/n cba-foundation-pro-bono-awardapplication.pdf

Presented to an attorney who has provided http://www.ncbar.org/media/362401/n exemplary legal services without a fee. cba-foundation-pro-bono-awardParticular consideration is given to lawyers application.pdf William L. Thorp Pro whose voluntary contributions have resulted February 1st Bono Service Award in the increased access to legal services on the part of low-income people.

Deborah Greenblatt Outstanding Legal Services Attorney Award

Committee not yet formed

Pro Bono Activities Committee

Pro Bono Activities Committee

Pro Bono Activities Committee

Pro Bono Activities Committee

Past President's Council

Corporate awards.ncbar.org Counsel Section http://www.ncbar.org/media/261113/n cba-foundation-lake-awardapplication.pdf

Mentor of the Year formally recognizes No current link. lawyers who provide exemplary service to their mentees and communities by serving as a mentor in extrodinary circumstances, devotes a significant amount of time to his or her mentee, serves as an exemplar for citizenship, professionalism, and commitment to the Bar, or who has taken on several mentoring relationships. Anyone can nominate an attorney for this award.

Recognizes members of the Corporate Corporate Counselors Counsel Section who are "Superstars" of Award their profession. The Lake Family Public Service Award annually recognizes an outstanding lawyer in North Carolina who has performed exemplary public service in his or her Lake Family Public community. The voluntary service of this February 1st Service Award attorney may have occurred with a non-profit organization or with a number of groups in the community as well as through elective or appointive office.

Dec 15 each year

156

[email protected]

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

Julianne Dambro [email protected]

Joyce Brafford

Recognizes pro bono efforts (in North Larger Law Firms Pro Carolina) from firms employing 30 or more Bono Award attorneys in North Carolina. Presented to an outstanding law student Law Student Group group whose pro bono project benefits lowFebruary 1st Award income people in North Carolina. Presented to a younger lawyer who has made extraordinary contributions by Younger Lawyer Pro providing exemplary legal services without a February 1st Bono Award fee to persons of limited means or to charitable groups or organizations.

February 1st

157

http://www.ncbar.org/media/362401/n cba-foundation-pro-bono-awardapplication.pdf http://www.ncbar.org/media/362401/n cba-foundation-pro-bono-awardapplication.pdf http://www.ncbar.org/media/362401/n cba-foundation-pro-bono-awardapplication.pdf Young Lawyers Division

Pro Bono Activities Committee Pro Bono Activities Committee

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

Kim Bart Mullikin [email protected]

INNS OF COURT – ARTICLES AND MATERIALS Pages: 158-170

E xcellentia

Board of Trustees

1229 King Street, Second Floor Alexandria, Virginia 22314 703-684-3590 Fax 703-684-3607 www.innsofcourt.org

Robert K. Walsh

Dean Emeritus, Wake Forest University School of Law President

The Honorable Donald W. Lemons Supreme Court of Virginia Vice President

Judge John M. Manos American Inn of Court

Seth Goldberg, Esquire Steptoe & Johnson LLP

October 19, 2009

Secretary

Frank A. Petro, Esquire

Petro Cohen Petro Matarazzo Warrington Treasurer

The Honorable Thomas L. Ambro U.S. Court of Appeals, Third Circuit

The Honorable W. Scott Bales Supreme Court of Arizona

Walter H. Bithell, Esquire Holland & Hart

John M. Bradley, Esquire Jones Day

Marsha E. Devine, Esquire

Minnesota Office of Attorney General

The Honorable Gary E. Hicks

Supreme Court of New Hampshire

Kim Hunter, Esquire

Alameda County District Attorney’s Office

Margaret E. Keane, Esquire

Greenebaum Doll & McDonald PLLC

The Honorable Douglas S. Lang Texas Court of Appeals, Fifth District

Thomas C. Leighton, Esquire Thomson Reuters

Richard H. Levenstein, Esquire Kramer, Sopko & Levenstein, P.A.

John C. Maloney, Jr., Esquire Day Pitney LLP

Patrick M. McLaughlin, Esquire McLaughlin & McCaffrey, LLP

Jan Michelsen, Esquire Ogletree Deakins

The Honorable Fred K. Morrison

Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services (JAMS)

The Inns of Court: From the UK to the USA “The American Inns of Court, Professionalism, and the Rule of Law” Justice Sandra Day O’Connor once observed, “Professionalism entails obligations: obligations toward other attorneys, obligations toward legal institutions, and obligations to the members of the public whose interests we serve.” Nevertheless, as Justice O’Connor continued, “All too often, lawyers seem today to believe that there is no room for those who believe that practicing law carries with it such responsibilities.” She concluded that the American Inns of Court “has a crucial role to play in eradicating such views.” For nearly 29 years now, the American Inns of Court has played a steadily evolving role in reversing the decline of professionalism within the bench and bar in the United States. Together with other organizations that focus on professionalism, the American Inns of Court has made a difference, if for no other reason than because it has generated much needed discussion and debate on the subjects of fostering civility, promoting professionalism, and improving legal skills. In fact, the singular, nonpartisan mission of the American Inns of Court is to foster excellence in professionalism, ethics, civility, and legal skills. This article describes how the American Inns of Court operates, how it has grown so quickly in number and popularity, and how it might continue to improve the quality of the legal practice throughout the United States and, thus, shore up our notion of the Rule of Law.

The Honorable Sandra Mazer Moss First Judicial District of Pennsylvania

Edward W. Mullins, Jr., Esquire

Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Brian J. Murray, Esq Jones Day

Lee S. Richards III, Esquire Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP

The Honorable Henry duPont Ridgely Delaware Supreme Court

John W. Robinson IV, Esquire Fowler White Boggs Banker PA

Kurt Sanford, Esquire LexisNexis

Richard A. Schwartz, Esquire

Schwartz Junell Greenberg & Oathout LLP

Kannon K. Shanmugam, Esquire Williams & Connolly LLP

Lisa Sharp, Esquire McGuire Woods

Kenneth W. Starr

Dean, Pepperdine University School of Law

The Honorable Carl E. Stewart U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit

Alan L. Sullivan, Esquire Snell & Wilmer LLP

Andrew Turner, Esquire Turner Law Firm LLC

The Honorable Peter D. Webster

Florida Court of Appeals, First District

The Honorable Christine M. Durham Chief Justice, Utah Supreme Court Ex Officio

Michael A. McConnell, Esquire Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP Ex Officio

BG David P. Carey, USA (Retired) Executive Director

The Concept The American Inns of Court is an association of lawyers, judges and other legal professionals from all levels and backgrounds who share a passion for professional excellence. It is not a fraternal order, a social club, a course in continuing legal education, a lecture series, an apprenticeship system, or an adjunct of a law school’s program. While many of these concepts may be present to some degree, the American Inns of Court is quite different in aim, scope, and effect. To help lawyers and judges rise to higher levels of excellence, professionalism, and ethical awareness, the American Inns of Court adopted the traditional English model of legal apprenticeship and modified it to fit the particular needs of the American legal system. Through the time-honored English tradition and practice of “pupillage”— the sharing of wisdom, insight and experience of seasoned judges and lawyers with newer practitioners, American Inns of Court helps lawyers to become more effective advocates and counselors with a keener ethical awareness. Of course, while many Inns have adopted the “pupilage” system, many Inns, such as Judge John M. Manos Inn, have developed their own successful practice for transmitting the values of the American Inns of Court. Whatever the practice, the Inns of Court has gained a national and international reputation as an organization that bridges the gap between formal law school education and legal practice by offering career-long continuing education in the Common Law tradition. Membership is normally composed of the following categories: Masters of the Bench—judges, experienced lawyers, and law professors; Barristers—lawyers with some experience who do not meet the minimum requirements for Masters; AssociLegal Excellence ■ Civility ■ Professionalism ■ Ethics

158

1

E xcellentia

1229 King Street, Second Floor Alexandria, Virginia 22314 703-684-3590 Fax 703-684-3607 www.innsofcourt.org

ates—lawyers who do not meet the minimum requirement for Barristers; and Pupils—law students. For some Inns, such strict categorization does not work. Some Inns have large “Master” and “Barrister” populations and small “associate” or even no “pupil” members. The basic building block of an American Inn of Court is the “pupillage team,” consisting of a few members from each membership category. Each pupillage team conducts one program for the Inn each year. Pupillage team members may also meet informally outside of monthly Inn meetings. Other Inns that do not follow the pupilage system conduct meetings centered around speakers, seminars, or other events that foster the free exchange of information about ethics and legal skills. Through regular meetings, members build and strengthen professional relationships; discuss fundamental concerns about professionalism and pressing legal issues of the day; share experiences and advice; exhort the utmost passion and dedication for the law; provide mentoring opportunities; and advance the highest levels of integrity, ethics and civility. In this collegial environment, outside the courtroom and pressure of daily practice, members discuss legal practice, principles and methods. Academicians, specialized practitioners and complementing generalists provide a mix of skill, theory, experience and passion. This fluid, side-by-side approach allows seasoned judges and attorneys to help shape students and newer lawyers with practical guidance in how to best serve the law and seek justice. This grass roots movement has blossomed into a structure of more than 350 affiliated, yet autonomous Inns. A large number of Inns concentrate on issues surrounding civil and criminal litigation practice, and include attorneys from a number of specialties. However, there are several Inns that specialize in criminal practice, federal litigation, tax law, administrative law, white-collar crime, bankruptcy, intellectual property, family law, employment and labor law, and even transactional law. History of the American Inns of Court In the 1960s, years before his appointment to the Supreme Court, Warren Burger envisioned an American organization that would help lawyers improve their advocacy skills while emphasizing the importance of professional demeanor, integrity and ethics. He was no stranger to the history, goals, operation and impact of the English Inns of Court, and saw enormous benefits to be realized by a similar close, ongoing linkage between members of the American judiciary, practitioners and law students. In 1977, now Chief Justice Warren Burger and other American lawyers and judges spent two weeks in England as part the Anglo-American Exchange. The members of the program were particularly impressed with the collegial approach of the English Inns of Court and with the way in which they passed on to new lawyers the decorum, civility, skills and professional standards necessary for a cooperatively functioning bench and bar. Soon after his return to the United States, the Chief Justice initiated a pilot program, an adaptation of the English Inns system, but geared to the realities of law practice in the United States. Working with Chief Justice Burger, former Solicitor General Rex Lee, and U.S. District Judge A. Sherman Christensen founded the first American Inn of Court in 1980. The Inn was affiliated with the J. Reuben Clark School of Law at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah and consisted of 44 member judges, lawyers, professors and law students. Word of the new training model spread across the country, and soon new Inns began to appear, and the grassroots “Inns of Court movement” began to grow. In 1985 the American Inns of Court Foundation was chartered in Washington, D.C., as a non-profit, tax-exempt corporation. The Foundation would serve as the hub for communications among the Inns, answer inquiries from the growing number of judges, lawyers and law professors, and provide the Inns with support, services and programs that as small, local groups would be beyond their individual reach. The first Board of Trustees of the American Inns of Court was comprised mainly of the progenitors of the local Inns. That group gave great care to the growth and direction of the Inns. High on the list of priorities was adherence to the English Inns’ successful model of mentoring by experienced senior members, a focus on training and development of practice skills for newer lawyers, and of course, the amicable association among all Legal Excellence ■ Civility ■ Professionalism ■ Ethics

159

2

E xcellentia

1229 King Street, Second Floor Alexandria, Virginia 22314 703-684-3590 Fax 703-684-3607 www.innsofcourt.org

members, regardless of rank. This was the chord that was destined to resonate throughout the American legal community. As other legal associations concentrated on studying the perceived problem and developing rules in an attempt to combat the maladies of waning professional practice standards, the American Inns of Court drew upon the wisdom and experience of seasoned practitioners to mentor, educate and inspire in its members the aspiration to a more craftsman-like application of the art and practice of law in America. Keeping this focus, the American Inns of Court soon earned a reputation as a truly unique organization. Recent History As early as 1983, the American Inns of Court concept was gaining widespread attention from many of the nation’s prominent legal institutions. An ad hoc committee, established by the Judicial Conference of the United States to study the goals and methods of American Inns, concluded that “the American Inns of Court have demonstrated the potential for supplying a significant new dimension to legal training”, and that “the official duties of judges are consistent with participation in an American Inn of Court.” It was to be the first formal recognition of the potential of the Inns of Court movement. In subsequent years, similar endorsements were passed by such respected groups as the Conference of Chief Justices, the Seventh Circuit’s Committee on Civility and the American Bar Association’s Judicial Administration Division. In 1988, the American Inns of Court received the ABA’s prestigious E. Smythe Gambrell Professionalism Award “in recognition of outstanding achievement in the design and implementation of a model professionalism program.” Later that year, Chief Justice Burger and The Right Honourable The Lord Bridge of Harwich signed a Declaration of Friendship, a historic document on both sides of the Atlantic, fraternally linking the English and American Inns of Court. This linkage was to be of considerable benefit to the American Inns of Court and its members, by providing entrée for American Inn members visiting the London Inns, and helping to lay the groundwork for the Pegasus Scholarships and the Temple Bar Scholarships. These educational programs allow selected American lawyers to participate in valuable work-study programs in the courts, chambers and Inns of London, and allow English barristers to enjoy the same benefits in the United States. By 1990, 124 chapters were in operation nationwide, actively involving some 8,000 judges, lawyers, professors and students of law in improving the professional skills of the bench and bar through mentoring, discussion and educational programs. The unprecedented growth evidenced not only the recognized need to raise the standards of advocacy, but also the willingness of the nation’s professionals to participate in the process. Holding true to its commitment to provide training for aspiring lawyers, the American Inns of Court launched the Law School Project in 1994 to add mentoring and practical training of the Inns to the formal education provided by the nation’s law schools. When the Law School Project ended on June 30, 1997, 114 law schools had become affiliated with the American Inns of Court program. Beyond impressive numerical growth through the ‘90s and into the next century, the American Inns of Court experienced an increase in stature as a national organization. Highlighted by an increase in its international exchange programs as well as programs and cooperative projects with other local, regional and national organizations, the American Inns of Court secured its role as a vital force in shaping a culture of excellence in the practice of law. Today Today, with more than 350 active Inns and more than 100,000 active and alumni members nationwide, the American Inns of Court is exploring exciting new and innovative ways to improve the civility, ethics, skills and professional dignity of the nation’s bench and bar. Fueled by the passion and dedicated efforts of newer memLegal Excellence ■ Civility ■ Professionalism ■ Ethics

160

3

E xcellentia

1229 King Street, Second Floor Alexandria, Virginia 22314 703-684-3590 Fax 703-684-3607 www.innsofcourt.org

bers and tempered by the wisdom and experience of its elders, the American Inns of Court continue to provide a collegial forum for study, discussion, inspiration and training for a growing number of legal professionals. Continuing to pursue a more active involvement with the entire legal profession, the American Inns of Court has greatly increased its cooperative involvement with other legal organizations. Through local, regional and national participation in various bar associations’ meetings and events, valuable alliances have been forged to the mutual benefit of the groups involved. Inns across the nation have traditionally put forth special efforts during the Law Day celebration spearheaded by the American Bar Association. In keeping with its mission to foster professional excellence through mentoring, a key component is recognizing those judges and lawyers whose professional lives evidence civility, competence and ethical attitudes worthy of emulation. In addition to the prestigious A. Sherman Christensen Award and Lewis F. Powell, Jr. Award, and the Sandra Day O’Connor Award presented annually at the Foundation’s Celebration of Excellence at the United States Supreme Court, the American Inns of Court has been honored since 1996 to present Professionalism Awards in each participating federal circuit as a part of their annual judicial conferences. Also, the Warren E. Burger Prize is presented annually to the winner of a legal writing competition, designed to promote outstanding scholarship on the practical application of professionalism in the American legal community. The Future A nexus clearly exists between lawyer behavior and the promotion and protection of the Rule of Law. Ethical breaches, incivility, discourteous treatment, disrespect toward judges, and failure to show concern for legal institutions undermine our system of laws. When lawyers forget their obligations to make the system work, the loser is the Rule of Law. Because of the relationship between professionalism and the American system of the Rule of Law, efforts of organizations like the American Inns of Court take on a special urgency. The American Inns of Court is committed to raise the bar of professionalism in the United States because of a strong belief that the Rule of Law depends upon an honorable legal profession to guarantee respect for our vital legal institutions. Professionalism, mentoring, and ethical behavior are essential to maintaining the Rule of Law because it is only through adherence to these high ideals that the American public will rightly believe in the importance of our commitment to justice. Society’s need for a credible system of justice and reliance upon the Rule of Law are too important to neglect the need to nurture professionalism among members of the profession charged with its protection and preservation. While the reach of the American Inns of Court has expanded, the number of lawyers in the United States has likewise expanded to nearly one million. Leaders of the American Inns of Court movement firmly believe the more lawyers are connected to the Inns movement, the more effectively its mission and values will spread to positively influence all members of the profession. The resurgence of professionalism must be a nationwide phenomenon. It is not enough that there are “pockets of professionalism” scattered throughout our national legal landscape. Growth of professionalism movements like the American Inns of Court is vital to the future of the legal profession. Restored professionalism must precede and strengthen the practice of law. We reclaim our noble profession with small, meaningful steps. If enough motivated lawyers band together to elevate the level of professionalism in this country, those steps might well beget giant strides. The Rule of Law itself may well depend upon our progress. David P. Carey Brigadier General, U.S. Army (Retired) Executive Director, American Inns of Court [email protected] 703-684-3590 Legal Excellence ■ Civility ■ Professionalism ■ Ethics

161

4

162

163

164

American Inns of Court North Carolina The Chief Justice William H. Bobbitt American Inn of Court Charlotte, NC President: Lex M. Erwin, Esq. Erwin Bishop Capitano & Moss PA 4521 Sharon Rd Ste 350 Charlotte, NC 28211 (704) 716-1200 [email protected] The Chief Justice Joseph Branch American Inn of Court Winston-Salem, NC President: W. Thompson Comerford, Jr., Esq. Comerford & Britt LLP 250 W First St Ste 200 Winston Salem, NC 27101-4055 USA (336) 631-8510 [email protected] The Craven-Everett American Inn of Court Durham County, NC President: Thomas R. West, Esq. North Carolina Independent Colleges & Universities 530 N Blount St Raleigh, NC 27604 USA (919) 832-5817 [email protected] The Guilford American Inn of Court Greensboro, NC President: Robert C. Cone, Esq. Tuggle Duggins PA PO Box 2888 Greensboro, NC 27402-2888 (336) 271-5230 [email protected] The Harry C. Martin American Inn of Court Asheville, NC President: Joseph P. McGuire, Esq. McGuire Wood & Bissette PA PO Box 3180 Asheville, NC 28802 (828) 254-8800 [email protected]

165

Strategic Plan Vision:

The Vision of the American Inns of Court: A legal profession and judiciary dedicated to professionalism, ethics, civility and excellence.

Goal:

To be widely recognized as a leader in promoting professionalism, which includes ethics, civility and excellence .

The American Inns of Court inspire the legal community to advance the rule of law by achieving the highest level of professionalism through example, education and mentoring.

A. Have a clearly defined brand. B. Communicate our brand widely and consistently. C. Partner with other national legal organizations to promote professionalism. D. Increase the visibility of the American Inns of Court by developing an organizational communications plan.

Goal:

Goal:

Mission:

The Mission of the American Inns of Court:

To promote a high quality member experience A. Identify the earmarks/components of a high quality member experience and determine how to assess whether an Inn is providing this experience to its members. B. Empower and enable local Inns to provide a high quality member experience.

Goal:

To have a greater impact on the profession. A. Identify opportunities to expand and increase membership in Inns. B. Assess and re-define the American Inns of Court’s relationship with law schools for the purpose of increasing student and faculty awareness of and involvement in the Inns of Court. C. Develop strategies to recruit and retain judges at all levels. D. Re-engage the alumni in the strategic planning and goals of the American Inns of Court. E. Develop new programs and expand existing programs to use the American Inns of Court Foundation’s national and international reach to make a greater impact on the profession.

Goal:

To be a primary resource for mentoring and education focused on professionalism, which includes ethics, civility, and excellence. A. Have more Inns of Court with mentoring programs. B. Assist new lawyers in finding a mentor. C. Encourage more education opportunities focused on professionalism for small firm lawyers, solo practitioners and other underserved areas of the profession. D. Expand our branded program offerings to non-members.

To have effective ongoing communications with members and alumni of the American Inns of Court. A. Analyze current communication methods, and the relative effectiveness of each of those methods. B. Develop a plan for improving communications generally, and incorporate improved communications into the ongoing operations of the organization, including each of its programs and services. C. Establish a clear methodology for ongoing evaluations of the effectiveness of communications.

Goal:

To establish a highly effective governance structure and culture. A. Define and implement the ideal board of trustees for the future of the American Inns of Court. B. Implement a strategic, efficient and effective committee structure. C. Review board member, officer and staff roles. D. Implement a continuing board and staff education program.

Goal:

To grow and diversify AIC revenue streams. A. Create a permanent capital development structure. B. Implement the permanent capital development structure.

166

1

225 Reinekers Lane, Suite 770 Alexandria, Virginia 22314 703-684-3590 Fax 703-684-3607 www.innsofcourt.org

What the American Inns of Court Foundation Does For Your Inn Conceived by Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, the first American Inn of Court was founded in 1980. The American Inns of Court Foundation was established in 1985 as a 501(c)(3) organization, to support Inns and further our shared vision of a legal profession and judiciary dedicated to professionalism, ethics, civility, and excellence. The core function of the Foundation is to promote, establish and charter American Inns of Court throughout the United States, assist and strengthen existing Inns, foster communications between Inns, and to act as the representative of Inns nationally and internationally. Our staff meets and engages regularly with Inn leaders to facilitate regional meetings, enhance Inn operations, develop programs, assist with the Achieving Excellence program, and to provide technical assistance, answers, support, and recommendations to Inn leaders and members. Here is a snapshot of the services that we provide to your Inn, to your Inn leaders and administrators, and to you as an American Inn of Court member:

For Inn Leaders: • Electronic access to more than 1,750 quality program offerings at no cost, through the national Program Library— which includes many award-winning programs • Chapter Relations Directors (CRDs), who work with you personally as an Inn leader, to meet the needs of your Inn— from training to finding programs, to managing your budget and meeting attendance. These directors meet face-toface with Inn leaders and visit Inns regularly • Regional Leadership Summits, planned and managed by your CRD, to bring you together with other Inn leaders to exchange ideas and best-practices • Online leadership resources on our website at www.innsofcourt.org, including our Model Mentoring Program • InnSight, the monthly hot topic e-newsletter for Inn officers, administrators, and program chairs

For Inn Administrators: • IRS group tax exemption status under the umbrella of the Foundation • General liability and umbrella insurance policies including host liquor liability coverage through the Foundation • A Chapter Management System, hosted websites and listservs, along with other administrative tools • Sample documents and recommendations for bylaws, budgets, and membership forms to assist in day-to-day Inn operations • Complimentary website portal for your Inn, linked through the American Inns of Court website

For Inn Members: • The Bencher magazine with articles on professionalism, ethics, other timely topics, news of your Inn, program spotlights, and inspiring profiles in professionalism • Free access to more than 1,750 quality programs in the national program library • An online Membership Directory to network with Inn members across the country • Exclusive eligibility for Pegasus Scholarships, as well as the Sandra Day O’Connor and A. Sherman Christensen awards, presented annually at the Supreme Court of the United States • Leadership training, program development resources, administrative assistance, and face-to-face support, which make your Inn strong and successful • Letters of introduction facilitating visitation to the English and Irish Inns • The Alumni Association—receive The Bencher and half of your dues is remitted back to your former Inn

Legal Excellence ■ Civility ■ Professionalism ■ Ethics

What AIC Does for Your Inn_Dunn.indd [REV 2/2016]

167

President's Message B y D e a n R ob e r t K . Walsh

This issue of “The Bencher” focuses on the important issue of civility. In addition to providing mentoring in ethics, professionalism, and the highest customs of the legal profession, the establishment of a local American Inn of Court chapter in an area has one other great benefit impacting civility: collegiality at the bar. In the Taming of the Shrew, Shakespeare said: “Do as adversaries do in law, strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.” One great advantage that our British counterparts enjoy is that their trial lawyers practice in a smaller bar and come from one of the four Inns in the city of London in a country with most of its population within 250 miles of London. As a young lawyer, I was a litigator in a very large metropolitan area in the late 1960's and early 1970's. Most lawyers who have practiced for approximately the same amount of time would say that collegiality and civility at the bar were greater during those years. Because of where I practiced, that was not my experience. During the 1980's, between deanships, I was a litigator in the much smaller city of Little Rock, Arkansas. I found that the smaller community in the 1980's was a more civil and collegial time. Even though Little Rock surpassed 1,000 lawyers while I practiced there, those who did the same type of litigation I did constituted a smaller group. Lawyers on the on the other side of a case knew that they would probably be seeing you or your partners in future litigation and also got to know you as people. One effect of establishing a local Inn of Court in an area is to get together lawyers on different sides of the bar in a collegial setting. At meetings of the local Inns, lawyers and judges meet together in an atmosphere that makes for a cooperative functioning bench and bar, getting to know each other personally and avoiding the anonymity that helps breed incivility. It is harder to be uncivil to someone that you really know. I believe that the American Inns of Court movement has done much over its 28 years of existence to contributing to greater civility in the American bar. We now have 362 local Inns in 50 states plus the District of Columbia with over 26,000 active members. In addition we have over 76,000 alumni members, so that slightly over 100,000 lawyers and judges have been members of a local Inn. However, this is only about 10% of the lawyers in America. We need to do more. Several years ago, I wrote an article for a law review about being a law school dean. One of my sections was titled: "The Dean as Evangelist." As the brand new president of the American Inns of Court Foundation, I want to act as an evangelist once again. I want each of you reading this article who are already a part of the American Inns of Court movement to work with me to establish more local Inns and touch more lawyers.

2

There are cities, both major and midsize, that have more than enough lawyers and judges to have more local Inns in the area. Moreover, as the practice of law has become more specialized, we have a number of specialized Inns around the country, including in the following areas: • Administrative/Regulatory, • Alternative Dispute Resolution, • Appellate, • Bankruptcy, • Commercial Litigation, • Criminal, • Environmental,

• Family, • Intellectual Property, • Labor/Employment, • Military, • Pro Bono, • Tax

If you are interested in starting a specialty Inn, we can put you in touch with a local leader in an exemplar local Inn in your practice specialty. Until recently, all of our American Inns involved advocacy in some form of dispute resolution, whether in a court or administrative agency. However, in the past year, we have chartered our first transactional Inn in New Jersey. As much as litigators, transactional lawyers are interested in civility and in mentoring young lawyers in the highest values of the legal profession. This transactional Inn was formed very carefully and its leaders are a great source of information, forms, and suggestions for forming other transactional Inns around the country. The national office of the American Inns of Court Foundation has great resources to aid in establishing new local Inns. We have regional directors covering the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and West that work with existing local Inns and help lawyers and judges interested in forming new ones. I hope that many of you will consider working with us and starting new Inns in your area. If you are interested please contact your regional director at the Foundation office at 703-684-3590: Phyllis Doak

Pam Wittmann, CAE

Director of Chapter Relations, Midwest Region (Fifth, Seventh, Eighth Circuits) [email protected] Ext. 110

Director of Chapter Relations, Southeast Region (Fourth, Eleventh, D.C. Circuits) [email protected] Ext. 101

Caryn Worcester

Members in the First, Second, Third Circuits

Director of Chapter Relations, Western Region (Ninth, Tenth Circuits) [email protected] Ext. 220

Interim contact: Pam Wittmann Members in the Sixth Circuit

Interim Contact: Phyllis Doak

You can make a difference to the professionalism of the next generation of lawyers by participating in starting a new local Inn of Court.

168

The Bencher ◆ September/October 2008

TALKING POINTS • THE AMERICAN INNS OF COURT IS A NATIONAL ORGANIZATION WITH A NATIONAL FOCUS ON A LEGAL PROFESSION AND JUDICIARY DEDICATED TO PROFESSIONALISM, ETHICS, CIVILITY AND EXCELLENCE •

OUR MISSION – AT THE LOCAL INN LEVEL AND THE NATIONAL LEVEL – IS TO INSPIRE THE LEGAL COMMUNITY TO ADVANCE THE RULE OF LAW BY ACHIEVING THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF PROFESSIONALISM



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOCUSES ON: o

OUR PROFESSION AS A WHOLE, AT THE NATIONAL LEVEL. WE ARE PRIVILEGED TO PRACTICE LAW – AND IT IS CRITICAL THAT PUBLIC RESPECT FOR AND TRUST IN THE LAW REMAIN STRONG. WE ARE A NATION FOUNDED ON THE RULE OF LAW AND IT IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY, AS LAWYERS AND JUDGES, TO KEEP THAT FOUNDATION STRONG.

o

PROVIDING SUPPORT AND RESOURCES TO YOUR INN, YOUR INN LEADERS, YOUR INN ADMINISTRATOR AND TO YOU – TO MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A STRONG AMERICAN INN OF COURT AND A STRONG INN EXPERIENCE



OVER THE LAST 18 MONTHS, THE BOARD HAS CREATED AND IMPLEMENTED A NEW STRATEGIC PLAN AND APPROVED A SUPPORTING OPERATIONAL PLAN – FOCUSED BOTH NATIONALLY AND LOCALLY. WE WANT TO EXPAND THE NUMBER OF INNS, AND INN MEMBERSHIP; KEEP JUDGES INVOLVED WITH INNS OF COURT; INCREASE OUR CONNECTION WITH LAW SCHOOLS; BROADEN OUR MENTORING OPPORTUNITIES; OFFER MORE TO SMALL FIRM AND SOLO PRACTITIONERS – AND ENSURE THAT WE CONTINUE TO DO ALL THAT WE DO NOW – LEADERSHIP SUMMITS, ASSISTANCE FROM YOUR CHAPTER RELATIONS DIRECTOR, NEWSLETTERS, THE BENCHER, HOSTING YOUR INN’S WEBSITE, FILING YOUR INN’S TAXES UNDER OUR UMBRELLA, FACILITATING ENLISH INN VISITS, SENDING YOUNG INN MEMBERS TO ENGLAND ON THE SIX WEEK PEGASUS SCHOLARSHIP, RECOGNIZING PROFESSIONALISM ACROSS THE COUNTRY WITH CIRCUIT AND NATIONAL AWARDS, AND SO MUCH MORE.



WE HAVE ALSO ESTABLISHED A GOVERNANCE TASK FORCE TO REVIEW OUR GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE AND CULTURE WITH AN EYE TOWARD DEFINING AND IMPLEMENTING THE IDEAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES FOR THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN INNS OF COURT AND A CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT TASK FORCE TO GROW AND DIVERSITY AIC REVENUE STREAMS.



I’D LIKE TO ENCOURAGE YOU TO DO THREE THINGS o ENGAGE, SPREAD THE WORD, SET THE EXAMPLE. CIVILITY AND PROFESSIONALISM BREED CIVILITY AND PROFESSIONALISM. o

SERVE. LEAD IN YOUR INN, SERVE ON A COMMITTEE AT THE NATIONAL LEVEL, COMPETE FOR NATIONAL BOARD SERVICE.

o

PARTICIPATE IN OUR GREAT PROGRAMS. NOMINATE SOMEONE FOR A CIRCUIT OR NATIONAL AWARD….APPLY TO BE A PEGASUS SCHOLAR……COMPETE FOR THE BURGER WRITING PRIZE….WRITE AN ARTICLE FOR THE BENCHER.

169

NOTES: Dues: Dues to national are $85 per member per year, effective 1 July 2016. Dues were raised for the first time in 7 years, from $75 to $85 to account for inflation. Your individual dues, above the $85, are set by and go to your local Inn. Chapter Relations Directors: Work with Inn leaders personally to meet the needs of your Inn. They will train you on the Chapter Management System, help you find programming, assist you with budgeting and meeting attendance – whatever you need. The Pegasus Scholarship Program: Open to Inn members with 5 years or fewer in practice. This is a sixweek scholarship to London to learn about the English legal system. We send two scholars each year, and in return, host two English scholars in the United States. English and Irish Inn Visits: We provide letters of introduction for Inn members who wish to visit an English Inn while in London. We also work with Inns to facilitate multi-member visits to London, and every few years we host a full-blown Amity visit to London. National Awards and Circuit Professionalism Awards: You must be an Inn member to be eligible for the Sandra Day O’Connor Award (for professional service) and the A. Sherman Christensen Award (distinguished service to the American Inns of Court). Inn members are, of course, also eligible for the Lewis F. Powell, Jr. Award (for professionalism) as well as the Circuit Professionalism awards and are encouraged to write for the Burger Prize. National Award recipients are recognized annually at the Celebration of Excellence hosted by a Justice at the Supreme Court of the United States. Achieving Excellence: A program designed to capture the best practices in Inn management, Inn programming, etc. Platinum Inns may send two representatives to the Celebration of Excellence. Leadership Summits: Inn leaders and Inn members are encouraged to take advantage of leadership summits which are designed to encourage Inns to share best practices. Program Awards: An annual program designed to recognize the best in programming that the American Inns of Court has to offer. Program Library: Programs are catalogued in our program library and Inns are encouraged to take advantage of the library as a starting point for their programs. Membership Directory: Members have access to the national membership directory to network with Inn members across the country The Bencher Magazine: Six issues per year, mailed or provided electronically to each active member. InnSight: The monthly leadership newsletter Insurance/Taxes/website portal: Your Inn has general liability and umbrella insurance including host liquor liability through AIC, and IRS group tax exemption status under AIC’s umbrella. In addition, AIC hosts your local Inn website.

170

DISTRICT COURT 50TH ANNIVERSARY Pages: 171-176

January 21, 2016

Board of Governors North Carolina Bar Association 8000 Weston Parkway Cary, North Carolina 27513 RE:

50th Anniversary of District Courts in North Carolina

Dear NCBA Board Member, This year marks the 50th anniversary of the creation of District Court and the unified court system in North Carolina. In celebration of this important milestone, the District Court 50th Anniversary Committee is encouraging local bars to host at least one event this year within your judicial district in recognition of the anniversary and to assist in educating the public as to the importance of the District Courts to our system of justice. As you are well aware, District Courts play a vital role in the administration of justice in North Carolina. Currently there are 270 elected District Court Judges. In fiscal year 2014-2015, District Courts statewide disposed of 2,588,957 cases ranging from complex domestic cases to minor traffic offenses. District Court is considered by many as the face of the court system in North Carolina since it is the level of court most likely encountered by the average citizen. While plans are currently underway for various events and activities throughout the year, recognition on a local level is in many ways more meaningful. As a local bar leader, your involvement and leadership in this initiative is vital to its success. As such, the 50th Anniversary Committee is respectfully requesting that you assist by working with your local bar presidents and Chief District Court Judge to organize an appropriate celebratory or educational event within your local judicial district. For informational purposes, you will find attached a very brief description of the events surrounding the creation of District Court and the unified court system. You will also find

171

attached a list of suggested ways that your local bar might recognize this important event. Obviously, this list is not exhaustive but is provided only to assist as a starting point in exploring the various options. In addition, the 50th Anniversary Committee is happy to assist you in any way possible. Should you have any questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to contact me at 919-792-4817 or [email protected] On behalf of the N.C. Association of District Court Judges and the 50th Anniversary Committee, I want to thank you in advance for your serious consideration of this request and your assistance in this most worthwhile endeavor. With warmest regards, I remain Sincerely,

Judge Robert B. Rader, Chair District Court 50th Anniversary Committee Cc: The Honorable Athena Brooks Chief District Court Judge, District 29B President, N.C. Association of District Court Judges

172

District Court Begins 50th Anniversary Celebration By Judge Robert B. Rader

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the creation of District Court and the unified court system in North Carolina. In order to appropriately commemorate this historic milestone, the Board of Governors of the N.C. Association of District Court Judges established the District Court 50th Anniversary Committee in 2015. Since its inception, the committee has worked diligently to develop and implement a strategic plan which is designed to accomplish a host of objectives including: publicizing the work of the court, educating the public on the importance of the Rule of Law in society and the role of the District Courts in our judicial system, creating historic resources related to District Court, promoting civics education in the schools, encouraging local celebrations and honoring those who have served as the District Court Judges over the years. The year began with Chief Justice Martin unveiling the new Judicial Branch Seal and the seal for District Court with the 50th Anniversary banner. With assistance from the Administrative Office of the Courts, various brochures and print material were created incorporating the 50th anniversary theme. These materials were distributed to District Court Judges and Clerks of Court throughout the state. In January, packets were sent to all State Bar Councilors and local bar presidents encouraging their involvement and leadership in organizing appropriate celebratory and educational events in the various local judicial districts across North Carolina. The first such event was held in Roxboro (Judicial District 9A) on the evening of March 21st when the Roxboro Kiwanis Club hosted a dinner honoring local court officials. Plans are currently underway for similar events throughout the year in various local districts. In commemoration of the 50th anniversary, the N.C. State Bar on March 16th published an article by attorney and former UNC School of Government professor Michael Crowell on The Origins of North Carolina District Court. The article traces the creation of the court from the work of the Bell Commission in the mid-1950s through the Constitutional Amendment of 1962, the work of the N.C. Courts Commission and the Futures Commission. A subsequent article by Professor Jim Drennan will also be published in forthcoming months in the State Bar Journal which looks at the evolution of District Court over the past fifty years and changes that have impacted the court. The article also explores what the future holds for the court. Articles are also in the works to appear in the N.C. Bar Association’s flagship publication NC Lawyer commemorating the 50th anniversary of District Court. Chief District Court Judge Robert Stiehl of Cumberland County is leading efforts to develop a model presentation for use by Judges and lawyers who speak to school groups and civics club about the courts. On May 6th the N.C. Bar Association will focus their annual Law Day Ceremony in part on the 50th Anniversary of District Court. The

173

prestigious Liberty Bell Award will be presented at that time to former Chief District Court Judge Beth Keever for her many years of service and dedication to the courts. As you can see, the many projects, events and activities are too numerous to mention; however, suffice it to say that the District Court 50th Anniversary Committee has been hard at work. The committee will continue to work closely with the Celebrate NC Courts Committee to coordinate with the planning for other historic anniversary celebrations within the Judicial Branch during the next four years. For more information, visit www.Celebrate.NCcourts.org.

174

175

176

Chapter 5

Level Up Leadership Joy Ruhmann

Motivation Matters: Understanding the Passions that Drive Us No matter where you turn in the research on leadership effectiveness one characteristic that all highly effective leaders possess is self-awareness. In fact, a study conducted at Harvard revealed that all effective leaders have the following core strengths: They know themselves - their strengths and their vulnerabilities, They understand and read other people well, and They adapt to others in ways that create win-win for all involved. Each of these core strengths can be enhanced in multiple ways. The simplest and quickest of which is through the receipt of some form of feedback. Feedback is available in multiple ways, two of which include: The use of some form of multi-rater, 360°feedback process where you receive feedback from your boss, your co-workers and/or your direct reports. Unfortunately, feedback from others, even in the form of an anonymous 360°, can be impacted by several things. The most common is personal bias. In all that we do, we bring our own personal bias to the “equation”. Additionally, some individuals are uncomfortable providing open and candid feedback either because they tend to be too nice, conflict avoidant or they have a fear of retribution or retaliation. A second method for receiving feedback is through the use of some form of personal assessment. A strong suite of personal assessments can be very effective in providing greater insight into your behavioral preferences, your passions (what we are reviewing today), and your key decision making style.

© Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 1

Our Passions profile, one of three assessment tools our clients use for hiring and selection and professional development is based on the research of Dr. Eduard Spranger and Gordon Allport. Both, throughout their lifetime, were driven to understand what motivates people to do the things they do, to invest their time, talent and energy into what they are most interested in. Through their combined research, Spranger and Gordon identified seven dimensions of “value” that help us understand the reasons that drive individuals to utilize their talents in the unique ways they do. The report provided during this program is designed to help you understand your motivators and drivers and provides insight into how you can maximize your performance by achieving better alignment and passion between what you do and what you love.

© Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 2

What’s behind our passions? Our passions develop over our lifetime based on our unique life experiences. They provide the logic for the ways in which we prioritize the use of our time, talents and resources. They give us a sense of satisfaction. Our passions help drive our personal decisions on questions such as: Should we protect wildlife at the expense of a person’s vocation? Should we spend a larger portion of our tax dollars on education or the military? What percent of our tax dollars should go to social programs and which ones? Should a female be allowed to play football as a kicker on an all-male team? In high school? In college? In the pros? Should an organization be allowed to change the retirement benefits that were promised after the people have retired? Should the federal government spend any of your tax dollars on support of “the arts”? Should “The Ten commandments” be allowed to hang on the wall of a federal courtroom? Passions differ for each of us based on our unique life experiences. That diversity is valuable and critical to success for all organizations and in all areas of our lives. No passion is “better” than another and our passions can change over time. This change occurs through a slow process or can occur as the result of a life changing event like winning the lottery or, more commonly a significant life event such as marriage, divorce, or a personal or family illness. Passions can also be a source of conflict. Passion related conflicts can exist between people or between a person and their job. Our passions can interact with one another to create both synergy and internal conflict. © Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 3

An Overview of Our Passions Our Passions influence our behaviors and actions and often serve as hidden drivers of performance. When the work we do is in alignment with our personal passions, we are more satisfied, more engaged and more productive every day. Misalignment between how our passions and how we spend our time can result in increased fatigue, reduced drive and when taken to the extreme to psychological and physiological issues. Provided below is a brief overview of the seven key passions that drive our decisions, behaviors and actions.

© Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 4

The Aesthetic Passion Individuals that rank this passion high are driven by the need to achieve balance and harmony and/or to find and express oneself. They are often involved in artistic pursuits, activities that support the environment or opportunities for self-improvement.

What they bring to the team: High – Need for form, harmony and beauty within and without, extending to clothes, surroundings and environment. Average – Situational only; does not extend to the totality of their life. Low – The aesthetic point of view leaves them indifferent, maybe even cold or they may feel negatively toward this view.

Goal: The drive to achieve balance, harmony and find form and beauty

Passions:

Artistic expression Harmony. Balance Form over function Mutual respect Creativity Self-fulfillment Subjectivity Beauty

Examples along the Aesthetic Continuum: Very High – A monk or priest who can’t step on an ant because it is alive. High – A performer or restaurateur Average - Respect for the environment and possibly a hobby they love. Low - Can see beauty but does not really value it or care to play with it. Very Low - Someone dress them PLEASE!! © Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 5

The Economic Passion Individuals with this passion are driven by the need to gain from the investment of their time talents and other resources, a desire to achieve practical returns and a motivation for security from economic gain. The preferred approach to work is highly professional, with a focus on bottom line results.

What they bring to the team: High – Many actions are driven by investment and return on their time, talent and financial resources. Average – Practical mind-set that looks for return on investment in specific arenas. Low – May feel uncomfortable with people who always focus on ROI. May not learn from mistakes or see the consequences of their actions

Goal: To gain security from economic gain, and to achieve practical returns Passions:

Practical returns Monetary interests Efficiency Utility Production Capitalism Maximizing gains Results

Examples along the Economic Continuum Very High – Driven by consequence and outcomes; strong need to justify everything. High – Typical business executive who feels that time is worth money and companies need profits. Average – Understands the consequences of decisions and actions. Low – May not always think of the consequences of their actions. Very Low - Often repeats the same mistake many times. © Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 6

The Individualistic Passion Individuals with this passion are driven by the need to be seen as unique, independent and to stand apart from the crowd. They are driven to be socially independent and want opportunities for freedom of personal expression.

What they bring to the team: High – A passion to control their own destiny. Average – Are able to balance the needs of both what they need and want and what others need and want. Low – Depending on their other passions, they are more likely to sacrifice self for others or for the team.

Goal: The need to be seen as unique, independent, and to stand apart from the crowd. This is the drive to be socially independent and have opportunity for freedom of personal expression. Passions:

Uniqueness Independence Special, Free Autonomous Relevant, Sovereign Self-governed

Examples along the Individualistic Continuum: Very High – Driven by attention, fame and to set themselves apart, even sometimes at all costs. High – A specialist in any field that wants to be known for being different or the best. Average – Understand the balance between the needs for self and needs of others. Low – May sacrifice own needs to meet the needs of others. © Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 7

Very Low - A Navy Seal who willingly gives his or her life for the service of others.

The Political Passion Individuals with this passion are drawn to roles where they are seen as a leader, have influence, and control over their environment and success. High levels of competitiveness are often association with those scoring high on this passion.

What they bring to the team: High – Strong leader, able to take control of a variety of initiatives and maintain control. Average – Will take the lead in specific situations (often dependent on other key passions). Low – Will be supportive of the efforts of the team.

Goal: The drive to be seen as a leader and to have influence over one’s environment or success. Competitiveness is often associating with those scoring high in this motivation. Passions:

Power, Control, Influence Governing power Leadership, Authoritative Competitive Accountable Status and esteem

Examples along the Political Continuum: Very High – Driven to be in charge; will often run for political office. High – Typically members of an executive team. Average – Comfortable with leading others, but not out to lead the greater organization. Low – Little to no desire to be in charge, will typically mentor people rather than take the lead. Very Low - Will avoid any form of confrontation.

© Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 8

The Altruistic Passion This passion can best be explained as the satisfaction one feels after helping others in a humanitarian sense. There is a genuine sincerity in this dimension to serve others and to give of one’s time, resources and energy in support of others.

What they bring to the team: High – A passion to better humanity, investing their talents and resources in helping the world become a better place. Average – Assisting others only situationally such as addressing family needs or specific causes their families have been touched by. Low – May react negatively to social causes believing them to be a waste of resources and time.

Goal: The drive to benefit others in a humanitarian way. They have a genuine sincerity to help others and give of their time, resources and energy in the aid of others. Passions:

Giving of self Support of others People orientation Helping. Caring Improving society Generosity Selflessness Compassion

Examples along the Altruistic Continuum Very High – Driven to help like Mother Teresa, actively give of their time, money and resources in service to others. High – Works in roles connected to service like teachers, nurses, firefighters, emergency medical technicians. Average – Recognize the need to serve others, and will do so situationally based on drive from other passions.

© Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 9

Low – Only open to helping based on persuasion from others. Again, highly driven by other passions. Very Low - Do not choose to serve, or expect to be served.

The Regulatory Passion This passion is about the drive to establish order, routine and structure in their work and life. They are highly motivated to promote rules and policies, approaching work with a traditional approach to problem solving. They seek security through standards and protocols.

What they bring to the team: High – Sees rules and routines as the key to consistent results; typically structured, ordered and concise, supporting a more traditional approach to work and life. Average – Often do not have a set systems for living and may be in the process of investigating/evaluating more routines Low – Often reacts negatively to others who follow the “book” rigidly.

Goal: The drive to establish order, routine and structure. Those with this passion want to promote rules and policies, a traditional approach and security through standards and protocols. Passions:

Systemic, Governed Orderly, Structured Traditional Regulated Principled Focused

Examples along the Regulatory Continuum Very High – Often work to make others believe with coercion, sometimes even force, like leaders of cults and highly structured religions. High – Ministries, priests, monks working with others to grow their faith. Average – Appreciate a strong sense of order and tradition. Low – Not sold that there is only way to do things. Very Low - Can actively rebel against their view of “the system”, challenging ideals and “expected” ways to approach life. © Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 10

The Theoretical Passion The passion to understand, gain knowledge, or discover the “truth”. People who rate this passion highly will often seek knowledge simply for the sake of knowledge. Rational thinking and intellectual pursuits are important to those with this dimension.

What they bring to the team: High – Greatly enjoys discovering, understanding and ordering knowledge. Average – Their drive for knowledge is situational often serving as a means to an end. Low – Is often negative or indifferent to gaining knowledge and discovery of truth. Will tune out discussions of details. Their desire to learn is highly situational.

Goal: To understand, gain knowledge, or discover the “truth”. Their motivation can often be to gain knowledge for knowledge sake. Rational thinking, reasoning and problem solving are important those with this passion. Passions:

Rational, Objective Fact-based Discovering the truth Learning Solving problems Intellectual power Analyzing Clarifying

Examples along the Theoretical Continuum Very High – Born genius, simply can’t learn enough, does not read fiction, only materials from which they can learn, highly intellectual. High – Professors seeking to find new answers to old questions. Average – Willing to learn new things and read up on a topic as a means to fulfilling another passion (means to an end) Low – Will learn only when necessary. Prefers an outline, bullet points and ways to focus only on what’s important. o © Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 11

Very Low – Only interested in the cliff notes.

Summary of the Passion Highs and Lows Aesthetic Passion

Economic Passion

Creative

Drive to Excel Satisfied

Open

Present Focus

Practical Individualistic Passion

Political Passion

Independence

Control

Secure

Mentor

Sacrifice

Yielding

Altruistic Passion Service to Others

Regulatory Passion Safety/Rules/Routine Flexible

Contribute

Theoretical Passion Need to Know

Cliff Notes, Please Independent/Variety

Intentional / Self-Driven © Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 12

Bullets Only

Sources of Conflict: According to www.dictionary.com, the definition of the word “conflict” as a verb is: To come into collision or disagreement; To be contradictory; At variance, or in opposition; To clash: Conflict occurs between individuals for countless reasons, some easily understood and recognized and others that are more difficult to identify and recognize. A significant source of conflict between individuals in all walks of life is a difference in their perspective on the rankings of the seven passions. Passion differences can be intra-passion conflicts and inter-passion conflicts. Inter-passion conflicts are the most easily understood because one individual values one or more of the seven passions highly and another is indifferent to that same passion. A visual representation of this type of potential is for this type of conflict is:

© Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 13

Conflicts Between the Different Passions We often refer to conflicts between the different passions as intra-passion conflicts. These conflicts are often more difficult for people to understand as they are a function of a differences in how they view what’s important to one another and how they will, in turn, spend their time. They can also exist either intra-personally or inter-personally. Source of Conflict: Experience vs. Getting Results

Source of Conflict: Focus on Self vs. Focus on Others

Source of Conflict: Desire for Independence vs. Desire for Safety and Routine

Source of Conflict: Drive for Power vs. Drive to Excel

© Level Up Leadership, Inc. All Rights Reserved 2010-2016 Page 14

Chapter 6

Tech Tips Joyce Brafford

Chapter 7

Bar Leadership With an Inclusive Perspective: Leading Four Generations Mark Merritt

•5/10/2016

Bar Leadership With an Inclusive Perspective: Leading Four Generations BLI 2016 Friday, May 13, 2016 Mark W. Merritt

Why Generations Matter Generational differences define who we are and what we believe more than we want to admit. Our Bar is now made up of four generations with very distinct attributes. We need to understand and take advantage of generational differences to be able to include each generation in our work.

Why Generations Matter • Most leadership training focuses on how to lead. • The premise of this presentation is that we need to pay more attention to who we lead and how to engage people to do the work of Bar organizations.

•1

•5/10/2016

Why Generations Matter • Generations also affect how involved we are. There has been a marked decline in civic involvement in the last third of the 20th century. • This decline was documented in the influential book “Bowling Alone” by Harvard Professor Robert D. Putnam. Putnam attributes the decline principally to generational change.

Why Generations Matter • Putnam attributes decline in participation to: • • • •

10%-pressures of time and money 10%-urban sprawl and commuting 25%-electronic entertainment 50%-generational change

Professional Organizations Take This Issue Seriously

•2

•5/10/2016

Deloitte LLP • “Research has shown that a generation can be characterized by a certain set of attitudes and beliefs…even if not all in the group share the majority’s views. We could look at the world through any number of lenses such as race, ethnicity, or lifestyle. It’s just that we’ve found that the topic of generational differences provides one of the best frameworks for fostering productive discussions about the changing workforce and work place.”

So what are these generations? • • • •

The Greatest Generation (b. 1922-1945) 62 million Boomers (b. 1946-1964) 77 million Generation X (b. 1965-1977) 52 million Millennials (b.1978-2002) 78 million

Greatest Generation Markers

•3

•5/10/2016

The Great Depression

The GI Bill—51% of Veterans Used

Greatest Generation Characteristics • Work: loyalty, commitment, sacrifice, discipline • Social Attitudes: Waste not, want not; use what you need; financial and social conservatism • Structure: Good with hierarchy, trust and respect authority

•4

•5/10/2016

Greatest Generation Characteristics • Feedback: Critical only (no news is good news) • Media: Read newspaper; watch network news—civic duty to be informed • Communications: Letters, memos, hard copy • Electronics: Will use computers but still afraid they will break them

Baby Boomer Markers—Vietnam

Baby Boomer Markers—Woodstock

•5

•5/10/2016

Baby Boomer Markers—Civil Rights

Baby Boomer Markers—Moon

Baby Boomer Characteristics • Work: Teamwork, build consensus, workaholic, driven • Social Attitudes: Idealistic, optimistic, status oriented, consumeristic • Structure: Individualistic, willing to climb corporate ladder for own benefit

•6

•5/10/2016

Baby Boomer Characteristics • Feedback: Don’t want it • Media: Still read newspaper and playing catch-up on other media • Communications: Face-to-face meeting or phone call • Electronics: Not on cutting edge, but mostly literate (follow their kids’ lead)

Gen X Markers—AIDS

Gen X Marker—Desert Storm

•7

•5/10/2016

Gen X Markers—Desert Storm

Gen X Marker—MTV

Gen X Marker—Latchkey Kids

•8

•5/10/2016

Gen X Marker—Internet

Gen x Characteristics • Work: Limited institutional loyalty, but loyal to boss and co-workers; entrepreneurial, seek work life balance, willing to move • Social Attitudes: Distrust institutions, cynical, pragmatic, open to diversity • Structure: Self-reliant, not fans of hierarchy, less trustful of authority

Gen X Characteristics • Feedback: Will ask for it • Media: Plugged in and want it interactive—less news, more entertainment • Communications: Email and voicemail • Electronics: Savvy, comfortable, a tool in the toolbox

•9

•5/10/2016

Millennial Markers—9/11

Millennial Markers—Brand You

Millennial Markers—Tech Explosion

•10

•5/10/2016

Millennial Characteristics • Work: Teamwork oriented, want work fulfillment in terms of fun and social bonds, multi-task, flexibility, work-life balance • Social Attitudes: Optimistic, tolerant, ambitious, multicultural • Structure: Work well in teams, need a lot of feedback and reinforcement, want a seat at the table and to be valued

Millennial Characteristics • Feedback: Crave it and want it to be continuous and meaningful, viewed as part of ongoing education • Media: From diverse sources—internet and all forms of social media—looking for the next big thing • Communications: Wedded to social media (“FOMO”); text, instant message, Twitter, social media are imbedded in their lives • Electronics: Ingrained in their being, unconsciously sophisticated and competent; there is an app for that • Uniquely burdened by student debt and aftermath of the Great Recession

What are the stereotypes? • Greatest Generation is boring, dull, conservative and unwilling to embrace technology • Boomers are selfish, materialistic and unethical • Gen Xers are slackers, loners and pessimists • Millennials are needy, whiny and immature

•11

•5/10/2016

How do we become more inclusive across four generations? • • • • •

Structure Communication Balance Bridging and Bonding Mentoring

Discussion—Structure of Bar Organizations How are we structured? Many bar organizations are hierarchical and you have to work your way up the ladder. Their structure reflects the characteristics of The Greatest Generation and Baby Boomers who believe you have to earn your way into leadership positions.

Structure • Gen X and Millennials dislike hierarchy and distrust authority. Avoid bureaucracy and red tape if you want to involve them. • Not enamored of idea of working way up the ladder. • Give them projects that allow their input, bring tangible results and allow feedback.

•12

•5/10/2016

Discussion—Seat at the Table • Gen X and Millennials are highly educated, savvy and creative. They challenge and distrust authority. They think outside the box and need space to operate. You need to win their trust by respecting their abilities. Give them a seat at the table. • Gens X and Millennials need to pay more attention to and value experience and not be dismissive of prior generation’s viewpoints.

Discussion—Communication • Use the latest technology and social media to gather information. • Use the latest technology and social media to communicate. • Emphasize the importance of personal interaction to Gens X and Millennials. • Respect each generation’s desired mode of communication.

Discussion—Balance • Gens X and Millennials are very concerned about balancing law practice and family life and we need greater sensitivity to time pressures. • Don’t meet for the sake of meeting. • Meetings that start late, don’t have agendas and don’t end on time are participation killers. • Use technology to make meetings more accessible.

•13

•5/10/2016

Closing Generational Gaps—Bridging and Bonding • Healthy organizations provide their members opportunities to interact with people of like interests (bond) and to interact with others or outside organizations that have different views or perspectives (bridge). Activities that bridge across generations are an important means to help the Bar be more inclusive organizations. The BLI is an activity that provides both bridging and bonding opportunities.

Discussion—Mentoring • Each generation also has different views on mentoring. These views relate to the purpose of mentoring, the nature of the relationship and the value of mentoring. In his article Generation Differences: Appreciating Different Generational Preferences, Randy Emelo summarizes generational mentoring characteristics as follows.

Discussion—Mentoring • Mentoring is a duty in service to succeeding generations, one that responsible employees engage in. • It is a long-term, loyal and committed relationship. • The mentor is the sole source of guidance and direction for the mentee’s career.

Traditionalist

• Mentees are beginners who need to learn the basics (usually in their first several years of experience). • Mentoring only happens face-to-face and on the job within a function (engineering, finance, marketing, etc.). • The mentor is older and higher up in the organization.

•14

•5/10/2016

Discussion—Mentoring • Mentoring is a career advancement strategy, mutually beneficial to both the mentor and mentee. • The mentor gains understanding from another point of view or another part of the organization; the mentee gains access to the mentor’s network and gains a higher level of visibility and support.

Baby Boomer

• Mentoring is primarily conducted face-to-face over breakfast or lunch. • Mentoring is not bound by function, but rather is driven by reputation and status. • Mentors are of higher status and mentees want to learn from and gain access to them through mentoring.

Discussion—Mentoring • Mentoring is a personal development activity that provides just-in-time learning relationships. • It is more of a peer-sharing activity and less of a vertical career advancement strategy. • Mentoring focuses on short-term connections to gain new understandings or competencies, rather than long-term commitments.

Generation X

• Mentoring provides direct access to desired collaborators. • Mentoring partners are peers who have different areas of experience. • Mentoring is not limited by proximity; face-to-face communications are preferred but not necessary. • Convenient access to mentoring partners is important; phone calls and email are communication tools of choice.

Discussion—Mentoring • Mentoring is a primary learning relationship. • It is situational and transactional, a temporary relationship focused on giving and receiving information. • It is expected to be used to learn job responsibilities. • Mentoring involves asking for immediate feedback or guidance from respected preceding generations.

Millennial

• Mentoring offers a way to connect cross-culturally and cross-functionally, and allows for an ever-expanding network of collaborators. • Anyone who knows more than they do is a potential mentor, anyone who knows less is a potential mentee. • Relationships can be virtual; communication is expected to be.

•15

•5/10/2016

Mentoring • Gen X and Millennials expect mentoring as part of their activities. Mentoring is real time, situational and part of an ongoing learning process. • The Greatest Generation and Baby Boomers view mentoring as relationship driven and not activity driven. • We need to inject more mentoring between generations that is driven by activities and situations and not purely by personal relationships.

Conclusion • Sensitivity to generational differences is essential to making our Bar organizations attractive, vibrant and productive. Your organization will benefit from tapping into the unique skills and experiences of the generations that make up our Bar.

•16

Chapter 8b

How to Develop a Successful Local Bar Mentorship Program Doug Brocker

Comments