Engineering Properties of Asphalt Performance

3MB Size 16 Downloads 24 Views

2014‐06‐10 1 Engineering Properties of Asphalt Cement Binders and their Relation to Pavement Performance Presentation to Third Year Civil Engineering
2014‐06‐10

Engineering Properties of Asphalt  Cement Binders and their Relation to  Pavement Performance  Presentation to Third Year Civil Engineering  Civil Engineering Department Royal Military College of Canada By Steven Manolis, P.Eng. General Manager, Coco Asphalt Engineering A Division of Coco Paving Inc. March 25, 2014

Outline • • • • • • •

Background  Superpave asphalt cement specification system Chemistry Aging characteristics of asphalt cement Handling considerations for heated asphalt cement Rheology Pavement Distresses – Relation to Asphalt Properties – Permanent Deformation (Rutting) – Fatigue Cracking – Low Temperature Cracking – Moisture Damage • Asphalt Recycling • Questions and Discussion

1

2014‐06‐10

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Asphalt cement (along with air) occupies the  space between the aggregate in an asphalt  pavement mix.   It is the “glue” that holds the aggregates  together and influences many of properties  of a flexible asphalt pavement.  A typical asphalt mix contains 5% asphalt  cement binder by weight (Disclaimer:  content may vary)

Asphalt Cement The 5%

2

2014‐06‐10

Asphalt Definitions (ASTM D8) • Asphalt – A dark brown to black cementitious material in which the  predominating constituents are bitumens, which occur in nature or  are obtained in petroleum processing. • Asphalt Cement – A fluxed or unfluxed asphalt specially prepared as to quality and  consistency for direct use in the manufacture of bituminous  pavements, and having a penetration at 25oC (77oF) of between 5 and  300, under a load of 100 grams applied for 5 seconds. • Bitumen – A class of black or dark‐colored (solid, semi‐solid or viscous)  cementitious substances, natural or manufactured, composed  principally of high molecular weight hydrocarbons, of which asphalts,  tars, pitches, and, and asphaltenes are typical. • Flux – A bituminous material, generally liquid, used for softening other  bituminous materials.

Terminology Asphalt Bitumen Asphalt Cement                          Binder Asphalt Binder  Modified Asphalt  AC or PGAC                  Modified Binder Aggregate Stone Coarse Aggregate                           Sand Fine Aggregate Gravel Hot Mix Asphalt Mix Warm Mix Asphalt Concrete Mix                             Asphalt Pavement

3

2014‐06‐10

Refined Petroleum Asphalt Cement

• Asphalt cement (or bitumen if you happen to be in  Europe) is produced by atmospheric and/or vacuum  distillation of crude oil

http://www.eurobitume.eu/bitumen/production‐process

Asphalt Cement Yield Influenced by Crude Source Boscan Venezualan

Arabian Heavy

Nigerian Light

3% by Volume Gasoline Kerosine Lt Gas Oils

6 7

21

Heavy Gas Oils

26

14 10 27

Asphalt Residuum

33

Over 1,500 crude oils in the world 

20

Potential asphalt  yields can range  from ~0 to 60%

16

586 286

30 1

API Gravity

10.1

28.2

38.1

Sp. Gravity

0.999

0.886

0.834

% Sulfur

6.4

2.8

0.1

↓ API Gravity = ↑ Asphalt Asphaltic crudes are heavy Non‐asphaltic crudes are light Heavy crudes are sour (↑Sulfur) Light crudes are sweet (↓Sulfur)

4

2014‐06‐10

SUPERPAVE

Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) • SHRP – US Congress established research program to improve  highway technology and performance – 5 year study (1987‐1992) – $150 Million in research • Asphalt • Concrete and Structures • Highway Operations • Pavement Performance

• SHRP Asphalt Research Program  – Largest SHRP research area – $53 million research allocation

5

2014‐06‐10

Superpave • Superpave (Superior Performing Asphalt Pavements) – Final product of SHRP asphalt research program

• Asphalt Binder Specification  • Performance Graded Asphalt Cements or PGAC

• Mix design/analysis system based on mix volumetric  properties • Superpave Mix Design Method

• Mix performance tests and predictive models • Not fully completed

SHRP Asphalt Binder Specification Development • Identify  – Critical pavement distress modes – Fundamental material properties associated with critical  distress modes – Test methods that generate fundamental material  properties • Consider timeliness, ease, cost, suitability for specifications 

– Surrogate test method if fundamental property related to  pavement distress is not suitable for specification use • Select another fundamental test – avoid empirical tests

6

2014‐06‐10

Pavement Distress Modes • Rutting – Permanent (plastic) deformation in upper hot‐mix layers at  high pavement temperatures

• Low temperature cracking  – Thermal shrinkage and fatigue cracking at low temperatures

• Fatigue cracking  – Load‐associated at intermediate pavement temperatures 

• Aging – Asphalt cement oxidizes and stiffens as it ages

• Moisture damage

Superpave Asphalt Binder Specification

PG  58‐28 Performance  Grade

Average 7‐day Maximum  Pavement Design Temp

1‐day Minimum  Pavement Design Temp

• Grading based on climatic temperature  – High temperature rating   • High ambient temperatures reduce stiffness of asphalt  cement making it more prone to permanent deformation  under traffic loads (rutting) 

– Low temperature rating • Low ambient temperatures increase stiffness of asphalt  cement making it more prone to cracking 

7

2014‐06‐10

Performance Grade Increments Average 7‐Day Maximum Pavement Temperature 

46 52 58 64 70 76 82 Average 1‐Day Minimum Pavement Temperature 

‐10 ‐16 ‐22 ‐28 ‐34 ‐40 ‐46 • Increments of 6oC between Performance Grades – PG 58‐28, PG 64‐28, PG 70‐28…. – PG 64‐28, PG 64‐34….

Design Pavement Temperatures • Average 7‐Day Maximum  Pavement Temperature  (THigh) – Pavement temperature at  20 mm below the depth of  the pavement layer surface

• Average 1‐Day Minimum  Pavement Temperature  (TLow) – Pavement temperature at  surface of pavement layer

Pavement Surface 20 mm 20 mm

50 mm

Surface Lift

70 mm

Base Lift

50mm Surface Mixture Over Base Mixture Depths Below Pavement Surface: Surface Layer THigh = 20 mm Surface Layer TLow = 0 mm  Base Layer THigh = 70 mm Base Layer TLow = 50 mm

8

2014‐06‐10

Pavement Design Temperature Determination • Convert Average 7‐Day Maximum Air Temperature  to Maximum Pavement Surface Temperature – Convert pavement surface temperature to pavement  temperature at required depths  – Theoretical energy balance used to calculate pavement  surface temperature (LTTP Bind Software)

• Convert Average 1‐Day Minimum Air Temperature to  Minimum Pavement Surface Temperature – Minimum Air Temperature = Minimum Pavement  Surface Temperature – Calculate minimum surface temperature for lifts of  asphalt mix below the surface lift using theoretical  equation (LTTP Bind Software)

Weather Database for Binder Selection  • LTPPBind (Long Term Pavement Performance) software – Superpave weather database for binder selection – Air temperature data for weather stations in US and Canada – Download ‐ Google “LTPPBind”or search in www.fhwa.dot.gov website

• High Air Temperature – Maximum 7‐Day moving average air temperature calculated for each year  – Mean and standard deviation computed for data set

• Low Temperature  – Minimum low temperature recorded for each year – Mean and standard deviation computed for data set

• Min/Max pavement design temperatures calculated base on:  – Statistical weather data for geographic location(s) – User selected pavement depth – User selected statistical reliability (e.g. 98% reliability, 95% reliability…)

9

2014‐06‐10

Kingston LTPPBind Output  ‐ PG 58‐28 Region

PG 58‐28 at 98% reliability 

Ottawa – LTTPBind Output – PG 58‐34 Region

PG 58‐34 at 98% reliability 

10

2014‐06‐10

ASPHALT CEMENT CHEMISTRY

Asphalt Cement Chemistry • Complex chemical composition – Up to 1,000,000 types of molecules

• Composition varies according to – Crude oil source (asphalt cements produced from  different crude oils may exhibit very different  chemistries) – Age of asphalt cement (chemistry changes as asphalt  cement ages) – Chemical modifiers which may have been used to  modify properties of asphalt cement 

11

2014‐06‐10

Elemental Analysis of Asphalt Cement Element

Average

Range

Element

Average

Range

Carbon  (% by wt)

82.8

80.2– 84.3

Nickel (ppm)

83

10 ‐ 139

Hydrogen  (% by wt)

10.2

9.8 – 10.8

Vanadium (ppm)

254

7 – 1590 

Nitrogen (% by wt)

0.7

0.2 – 1.2

Iron (ppm)

67

5 – 147

Sulfur (% by wt)

3.8

0.9 – 6.6

Manganese (ppm)

1.1

0.1 – 3.7

Oxygen  (% by wt)

0.7

0.4 – 1.0

Calcium (ppm)

118

1 – 335

Atomic  Ratio  (H/C)

1.47

1.42 – 1.50

Magnesium (ppm)

26

1 – 134 

Sodium  (ppm)

1.47

1.42 – 1.5

• Asphalt cement consists primarily of carbon and hydrogen  (hydrocarbon) along with other heteroatoms (nitrogen, sulfur,  Shell Bitumen Handbook – 5 oxygen) as well as metals 

th

Ed

Separating Asphalt Cement Into Broad Chemical  Components – SARA Analysis Asphalt Cement (n‐heptane precipitation) Maltenes (n‐heptane soluble) Filter

Saturates (n‐heptane elution)

Asphaltenes (n‐heptane insoluble)

Silica gel/alumina chromatography

Aromatics (toluene elution)

Resins (toluene/methanol elution)

12

2014‐06‐10

Asphalt Cement Chemical Fractions • Asphaltenes (5‐25% by mass) – n‐heptane insoluble black/brown amorphous solids – Highly complex and polar hydrocarbon structures with  nitrogen, sulfur, oxygen heteroatoms – Affect rheology of asphalt cement – Increasing asphaltene content = harder, more viscous binder

• Resins (+/‐ 20% by mass) – Soluble in n‐heptane & dark brown in colour – Polar hydrocarbons with sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen atoms – Strongly adhesive & act as dispersing agents for  asphaltenes

Asphalt Cement Chemical Fractions • Aromatics (40‐65% by mass) – – – – –

Dark brown non‐polar viscous liquid  Lower molecular weight napthene aromatics Comprise majority of dispersion medium for asphaltenes Aromatic rings with non‐polar hydrocarbon chains Able to dissolve other high molecular weight hydrocarbons

• Saturates (5‐20% by mass) – White/straw brown non‐polar viscous oils – Straight & branch aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl  napthenes and some alkyl aromatics  – Waxy and non‐waxy saturates

13

2014‐06‐10

Dispersed Polar Fluid Model of Asphalt Cement • Asphalt microstructure = Dispersed Polar Fluid (DPF) – Continuous 3‐D dispersion of polar molecules (asphaltenes)  dispersed in fluid of relatively non/low‐polar molecules  (maltenes)  – Polar molecules can form numerous physical bonds (weaker  than the chemical bonds between the atoms in the  molecules) which can be continuously broken and reformed – Magnet analogy Asphaltenes can interact together through physical polar bonds which can be broken and reformed depending on application or removal of mechanical & thermal energy (force and heat)

Magnets represent polar asphaltenes. Chemical bonds that hold each individual magnet together are stronger than physical bonds that attract north and south poles of magnets to each other

Asphalt Cement Physical Properties Influenced by Forming and  Breaking of Polar Bonds Between Molecular “Super‐Structures” Thermal & Mechanical Energy

Polar molecules  (asphaltenes) associate  through numerous  polar bonds and  behave as extended  molecular structures  giving rise to elastic  material behaviour 

Polar bonds between  asphaltene molecules  are weaker than  chemical bonds holding  each asphaltene  molecule together so  they break (and  reform) first if  mechanical energy or  thermal energy is  applied (or removed)

Asphalt also exhibits  viscous behaviour  because components of  polar network can move  past each other while  dispersed in non‐polar  fluid

14

2014‐06‐10

ASPHALT CEMENT  AGING CHARATECRISTICS

Asphalt Hot Mix Production 

292oF = 144oC

• Hot aggregate mixed and coated with a thin film (high  surface area to volume ratio) of hot asphalt cement  • SHORT TERM AGING ‐ Asphalt cement reacts with oxygen  (oxidizes), loses volatiles, and stiffens

15

2014‐06‐10

Asphalt Hot Mix Plant 

Drum Mix Plant (Continuous Flow)

Asphalt Pavement Construction

• Asphalt cement undergoes additional SHORT TERM  AGING as it remains hot while it is transported to site,  placed through a paver, and compacted with rollers.

16

2014‐06‐10

Composition and Viscosity Changes During  Mix Production, Placement, and  Service Life • SHORT TERM AGING – Significant stiffening during  mixing and compaction phases  – Asphalt cement reacts with  oxygen (oxidizes) as it coats  aggregate as thin film (high  surface area)  at high temps 

Aging Index represents the stiffening of asphalt  cement at a given time in service 

• LONG TERM AGING – Gradual oxidation & stiffening  during pavement service life

• Composition changes – Asphaltenes ↑ – Aroma cs, Resins↓ – Increased polar asphaltene  interactions produce stiffening  of binder as it ages Shell Bitumen Handbook – 5th Ed.

SHORT TERM & LONG TERM AGING • SHORT TERM AGING  – Stiffening during short term aging process designed into  specification for asphalt cement to help prevent rutting  (permanent deformation) under traffic loads

• LONG TERM AGING – Asphalt cement binders designed to account for long  term aging during service and remain flexible as they  oxidize and stiffen in order to mitigate cracking

• SIMULATED AGING PROCEDURES – Necessary to evaluate asphalt binder properties 

17

2014‐06‐10

Rolling Thin Film Oven (RTFO) Procedure • Simulates short term aging experienced  by binder during mix production and  construction operations – Hot asphalt cement binder coats hot  aggregates as a thin film in presence of  air (oxygen)

• RTFO Procedure – 35 g binder poured into RTFO jar and  placed horizontally into rotating carriage  (15 rev/minute) in RTFO oven – Binder coats inside of bottle as thin film – Conditioned at 163oC for 85 minutes – 4,000 l/min air stream flows bottles as  they rotate past air jet at bottom of oven

RTFO Oven

RTFO Jars

Rolling Thin Film Oven (RTFO) Procedure • Procedure stiffens binder due to  oxidation and volatiles loss – RTFO conditioned binder used in  subsequent testing and  conditioning protocols RTFO Oven

• Mass loss measured to assess  potential volatiles lost during  hot  mix production and paving  • Mass Loss Specification = 1% Max RTFO Jars

18

2014‐06‐10

Pressure Aging Vessel (PAV) • Long term aging – Simulates aging that asphalt  cement binder experience  after 5‐10 years in the field – Performed on residue from  RTFO procedure (i.e. after the  binder has undergone  simulated short term aging) Pressure Aging Vessel (PAV)

Pressure Aging Vessel (PAV) • Binder conditioned under elevated  temperature and pressure to simulate  long term field oxidation and aging • Approx. 50 g binder poured into PAV pan  (~3.2 mm film depth) & conditioned  under 2.1 MPa pressure for 20 hours • Conditioning Temperatures

PAV Pan

– High temp PG 52 or lower conditioned at  90oC – High temp PG 58 or higher conditioned  at 100oC – Binders designed for desert climate  conditioned at 110oC Pressure Aging Vessel (PAV)

19

2014‐06‐10

HOT (HEATED)  ASPHALT CEMENT 

Asphalt Cement Handling • Asphalt cement does not readily flow at ambient temp. – Reduce viscosity (measure of resistance to flow) to pump,  mix, and use in production/construction of pavements 

• Three solutions – Heat (most prevalent) – Dissolve in solvent (cut‐back asphalt) – Disperse in water with chemicals (asphalt emulsion –true  beauty, but a topic for another day)

• Considerations – hot asphalt cement  – Heat safely ‐ flammability – Understand viscosity properties (resistance to flow) 

20

2014‐06‐10

Safety – Asphalt Cement Flash Point  • Specified COC Flashpoint > 230oC  – Minimize risk of fire when heating to  pumping & mixing temp. below 230oC  • Cleveland Open Cup (COC) Flashpoint   – Asphalt cement poured into sample cup  & gradually heated – Swivel arm with flame at end passes  back & forth over sample – Flashpoint is temperature at which  vapours above sample momentarily  ignite when flame passes over sample

Swivel Arm With Flame  At End 

Sample Cup

Cleveland Open Cup Testing Apparatus (ASTM D92)

Viscous Flow

γ μ







τ γ









• Fluid layers flow past each other at molecular level – Layer 1 moves faster than layer 2  – Shear Stress τ develops between layers due to difference  in relative velocity between layers Rate of Shear Strain – Coefficient of Viscosity µ relates Shear Stress τ and  Rate of Shear Strain

21

2014‐06‐10

Viscosity (µ) • Viscosity (µ) – Slope of Shear Stress (τ) vs. Rate  of Shear Strain graph – Higher viscosity = greater  resistance to flow

• Newtonian Fluids  – Linear relationship between Shear  Stress (τ) and Rate of Shear Strain – Viscosity (μ) is constant at different  Shear Strain Rates  – Unmodified asphalt cements are  typically Newtonian Fluids at high  temperatures

• Non‐Newtonian Fluids – Non‐Linear relationship between  Shear Stress (τ) and Rate of Shear  Strain

Shear Thinning – Ketchup Shear Thickening – Starch Solution Bingham Plastic  ‐ Toothpaste  (Minimum Shear Stress Required  to Initiate Flow )

Rotational Viscometer Asphalt cement sample  heated in temperature  controlled sample chamber Metal spindle rotates (spins) Torque required to rotate  spindle is converted into  absolute viscosity  Units = Pascal‐Seconds (Pa‐s) Poise (P)

• Viscosity characterizes asphalt cement flow characteristics  at elevated temperatures and provides info for – Pumping and mixing operations at refinery, terminal, asphalt  plant – Mixing & compaction temperatures for laboratory asphalt mix  design 

22

2014‐06‐10

Temperature‐Viscosity Chart

• AC Viscosity very sensi ve to temperature (Temperature ↑ = Viscosity ↓)  • Temperature‐Viscosity charts used to predict mixing and compaction temperatures  for laboratory (not in the field) mix designs based on equi‐viscous temp. ranges • Applicable to unmodified binders (required temperatures  for polymer  modified binders often over‐predicted by using this methodology)

Asphalt Binder Viscosity Specification • Maximum Viscosity =  3 Pa‐s at 135oC 3 Pa‐s = 3,000 cP Pascal‐second ‐> Pa‐s Centipoise ‐> cP

• Specify maximum viscosity to  ensure ability to properly  pump/mix asphalt binder  – Specification may be waived if  binder can be properly  handled at higher viscosity

Rotational Viscometer

23

2014‐06‐10

AASHTO M320 Specification

ASPHALT CEMENT RHEOLOGY “PANTA REI” – “EVERYTHING FLOWS”  Motto of the Society of Rheology

24

2014‐06‐10

Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) • Measures rheological properties of asphalt  cement binders – Relate to rutting (resistance to permanent  deformation) and fatigue properties  

• Sample positioned between parallel plates – Top plate oscillates back and forth – Bottom plate remains stationary 

• Controlled stress mode – Apply oscillating stress & measure resulting  strain

• Controlled strain mode – Apply oscillating strain & measure resulting  stress

Viscoelastic Response to Applied Stress or Strain • Viscoleastic materials exhibit  a lag between an applied  stress or strain and the  resulting response • Oscillating application of  stress or strain (RED) and the  resulting response (BLUE) can  be mathematically  represented as sinusoidal  waves with the same  frequency and different  phases  • Phase lag describes the  delayed response to an  applied stress or strain Click on picture to run animation

25

2014‐06‐10

Complex Modulus (G*) • Complex Shear Stiffness Modulus G* – Ratio of Maximum Shear Stress τm divided by  Maximum Shear Strain γm • Upper DSR plate oscillates back and forth – Measure Angle of Rotation θ and applied  Torque T – Determine Shear Stress τ and Shear Strain γ G* Complex Shear Stiffness Modulus Pa τm Maximum Shear Stress Pa γm Maximum Shear Strain θ Angle of Rotation h Sample height r Radius of Sample/DSR plates T Torque

r

θ

θr



τ γ

τ

2 π

γ

θ

Sine Wave Derived from Polar Plot of Circle

C Circumference r Radius Angles are expressed as Radians.  A Radian is the length of an arc along the  circumference (C)  of a circle with length equal to the radius (r) of the circle.  

C 2πr, ∴  2π Radians in a circle. 2π rad 360o and 1 rad 57.3o

26

2014‐06‐10

Sinusoidal Waveform

+τmax

τt

τmaxsin ωt)

τ

ω Angular Frequency rad/s

ωt

Θ Angle of Rotation ωt rad/s t Time s τt

θ ωt

Shear Stress Pa at time t

τmax Maximum Shear Stress Pa Amplitude of Sine Wave

ωt

Rotating Phasor

‐τmax

Sinusoidal Waveform in Time Domain

Generalized Equation for Sinusoidal  Waveform

No Shift (Reference)

Positive Shift (Leading)

Negative Shift (Lagging / Delayed)

A t Value of sinusoidal wave A at time t Am Amplitude maximum value of A ω Angular Frequency φ Phase Shift Angle to account for shift in sinusoidal wave from the reference wave

27

2014‐06‐10

Perfect Elastic and Viscous Responses τt

τmaxsin ωt) = π/2 rad

• Perfectly Elastic Solid – Applied Shear Stress &  Resulting Shear Strain  are in phase 

Phase Angle δ 0o • Perfectly Viscous Fluid – Shear Strain lags  Applied Shear Stress by  90o phase lag

Phase Angle δ ‐90o or –π/2 radians

γt γt

γmaxsin ωt)

γmaxsin ωt‐δ

δ π/2 γt

γmaxsin ωt‐π/2)

Viscoelastic Behaviour τt

τmaxsin ωt)

γt

γmaxsin ωt‐δ) δ δ



T t G∗ τ γ

2 Δ

, radians Δ , degrees 360

Period Cycle Time Time, s Complex Modulus, Pa Shear Stress, Pa Shear Strain

28

2014‐06‐10

Perfect Solid  • Perfectly Elastic Solid

Force F is proportional to displacement γ γ,





For sinusoidal displacement γ t γmaxsin ωt Then 

Ft

γmaxsin ωt

• Both Force F and displacement γ depend on sin ωt and  are in‐phase (no phase angle lag)

Perfect Fluid • Perfectly Viscous Fluid

Force F is proportional to rate of  deformation or shear strain rate ,



sin ωt and cos ωt are out of 

For sinusoidal strain displacement                 

phase by 90o or π/2 radians

γ t γmaxsin ωt

Differentiate the strain equation to obtain  strain rate

γmaxcos ωt ∴ F t

The derivative of sin x is cos x

γmaxcos ωt

• Force (F) depends on cos(ωt) and strain (γ) depends on sin(ωt) They are are out of phase by 90o (π/2 radians) 

29

2014‐06‐10

Complex Numbers Im

• Cartesian Coordinates

1





1

y

r sin θ Re

x

r cos θ

• Polar Form θ & ∴

θ θ

θ

sin θ

∟ θ cos θ









θ Note:   Polar Form is for non‐zero (x+iy≠0) complex numbers as the complex number  0 has no polar angle.

Complex Exponential Form • Leonhard Euler (famous Swiss Mathematician)





Since   z

1

θ







1

θ

Im

y



r sin θ

Re

x

r cos θ

30

2014‐06‐10

Phasor Representations of Sinusoids Im

A=Ameiφ

Am φ

Amsinφ Re

Amcosφ

A= Amcosφ+iAmsinφ =Ameiφ

Real{A}=Amcosφ

Imaginary{A}=Amsinφ

A(t) = Value of sinusoidal wave A at time t   Am = Amplitude (maximum value of A) ω = Angular Frequency φ = Phase Shift Angle to account for shift in sinusoidal wave from a value of zero (0) at  at t = 0  (at the origin of the x‐axis representing time and the y‐axis representing the  value of A)

Equivalent Expressions for  Leading Applied Stress with Lagging Strain Response τ=τmsin(ωt+δ) τ=τmsin(ωt) δ

Equivalent to

Reference Axis

δ

Reference Axis

γ=γmsin(ωt)

γ=γmsin(ωt‐δ)

δ Equivalent to



Strain (γ)  lagging applied stress (τ)  by phase angle δ

Equivalent to

Applied stress (τ) leading strain (γ) by phase angle δ

31

2014‐06‐10

Relationship Between Sinusoidal Waveform Equation and  Phasor Notation for Viscoelastic Stress and Strain  Im

δ

τ∗ ∗

γ

δ

ωt

τ∗ γ∗

Re

γ δ

τ∗

δ

τ∗

Im

τ∗

δ

ωt δ

δ

δ

Re δ

τ∗

τ∗

δ

δ

Relationship Between Sinusoidal Waveform Equation and  Phasor Notation for Viscoelastic Stress and Strain  Im

δ

τ∗ γ∗ ωt

τ∗ ∗

γ

δ

Re

γ δ

Im γ γ

γ∗ ωt

γ Re



γ∗

γ

γ

γ∗

γ

γ

γ∗ γ

γ γ

γ∗

γ

32

2014‐06‐10

Storage Modulus (G’) & Loss Modulus (G”) Im

τ∗ γ∗ ωt











τm γm

τ∗

δ

γ∗

Re

τmei(δ+ωt) γmeiωt

τm γm

τm cos δ γm

τm γm cos δ

γ

Division & multiplication rules for complex exponentials follow rules for real  exponential numbers:



τm γm

Storage Modulus

δ

"

=

Euler’s Formula 

τm γm

δ

=

cos δ

δ

Loss Modulus

Complex Modulus G* composed of a Storage Modulus (G’) and a Loss Modulus (G”)





i

"

Storage Modulus (G’) relates to recoverable (elastic) deformation Loss Modulus (G”) relates to non‐recoverable (viscous) deformation

Storage Modulus (G’) and Loss Modulus (G”)

Loss Modulus (G’’)

Storage Modulus (G’)

33

2014‐06‐10

Storage Modulus (G’) & Loss Modulus (G”) δ

τ

τ sin ω

δ



τ sin ω

cos δ

γ

γ sin ω

Shear Stress Equation

τ sin δ cos ω sin

τ γ

τ sin ω cos δ γ sin ω

τ

γ

τ

γ

cos

τ sin δ cos ωτ γ sin ωτ

τm cos δ sin ω γm

τm γm cos δ



sin

sin

cos

Shear Strain Equation

γ

" cos

Multiply each side by γ

τm sin δ cos ω γm

γ

"

Storage Modulus

sin ω

Divide Shear Stress by Shear Strain 

τm γm

δ

Loss Modulus

Loss Modulus (G’’)

ω

Storage Modulus (G’)

Storage Modulus (G’) & Loss Modulus (G”) τ sin ω

τ

γ sin ω

γ τ

γ ∗

|

|

δ

sin ω

Shear Stress Equation

"

γ

" cos

ω

τm γm Dynamic Modulus τm γm cos δ

Storage Modulus

τm γm

Loss Modulus

δ

τm γm

∗|

Shear Strain Equation

Magnitude of Complex Modulus



|

"

τm γm

δ

δ τm cos δ γm

|

∗ |=

"  

/



Complex Modulus (G*) can be into a Storage Modulus (G’) and a Loss Modulus (G”)



" cos ω sin ω γ In the eqn for Shear Stress τ γ – Storage Modulus (G’) is associated with sin(ω ) which is in phase (elastic =  recoverable) with the applied sinusoidal stress and represents ability of material to  store potential energy and release it upon deformation – Loss Modulus (G”) is associated with cos(ω ) which is 90o out of phase (viscous =  non‐recoverable) with the applied sinusoidal stress and represents energy dissipated  as heat upon deformation

34

2014‐06‐10

Who said asphalt engineering isn’t rocket science?

RUTTING IN  ASPHALT PAVEMENTS

35

2014‐06‐10

Rutting in Upper Pavement Layers • Accumulated plastic (permanent)  deformation in mixture caused by  repeated traffic loading • Factors that influence rutting – Aggregate and mixture properties – Asphalt cement binder properties – Condition of base, sub‐base,  foundation – Traffic loading – Pavement temperature (more  likely in summer)

Rutting Parameter |G*|/sinδ |G*|/sinδ on Original Binder at 10 rad/s (1.6 Hz) ≥ 1.00 kPa |G*|/sinδ on RTFO Residue at 10 rad/s (1.6 Hz)  ≥ 2.20 kPa • Higher |G*|/sinδ values = Improved Rutting Resistance ↑|G*| = Stiffer binder (resists permanent deformation) ↑δ = More elastic binder (G*/sinδ increases as δ decreases) Frequency of 10 rad/s approximates traffic at 80‐100 km/hr Note:  |G*| denotes magnitude of Complex Modulus G* In the literature, the |  | notation is commonly excluded and  the rutting parameter is written as G*/sinδ although the  proper notation is |G*|/sinδ

36

2014‐06‐10

Rutting Parameter |G*|/sinδ |G*|/sinδ on Original Binder at 10 rad/s (1.6 Hz) ≥ 1.00 kPa |G*|/sinδ on RTFO Residue at 10 rad/s (1.6 Hz)  ≥ 2.20 kPa • RTFO Residue has undergone simulated short term aging and  stiffening that binder is expected to experience when processed  through asphalt plant  • Minimum requirement for Original Binder safeguards against  over reliance on short term aging through asphalt plant (i.e. in  case of low process temperature)

Rutting Parameter |G*|/sinδ |G*|/sinδORIGINAL BINDER ≥ 1.00 kPa    |G*|/sinδRTFO RESIDUE ≥ 2.20 kPa • Test binder at high pavement temperature for climatic region  and “grade bump” for increased traffic loadings – One (1) Grade Bump = 6oC – PG 58‐28 (southern Ontario) may be bumped to PG 64‐28 for increased traffic  loading (ESAL = Equivalent Single Axle Load of 18,000 lb / 80 kN) Adjustment to High Temp PG Grade Based on Traffic Loading ESALS (Millions)

Standing Traffic

Slow Traffic

Standard Traffic

<0.3







0.3 ‐ 3

2

1



3 ‐ <10

2

1



10 ‐ <30

2

1



≥30

2

1

1 AASHTO M 323 Table 1

37

2014‐06‐10

AASHTO M 320 Binder Specification  Tests on Original Binder   Safety   Pumping & Handling   Rutting  Tests on RTFO Residue   Limit on Volatile Loss  Rutting

• All binders required to meet G*/sinδORIGINAL BINDER≥ 1.0 kPa and   G*/sinδRTFO RESIDUE≥ 2.2 kPa  – Test PG 58‐28 at 58oC, PG 64‐34 at 64oC, PG 70‐28 at 70oC etc. • Flashpoint, Viscosity, & Mass Loss specifications apply to all binders

FATIGUE  CRACKING

38

2014‐06‐10

Fatigue Cracking • Cracking in asphalt pavement mixture  caused by repeated traffic loading • Factors that influence fatigue cracking – Binder fatigue properties & traffic loading – Age of asphalt pavement & factors which  increase oxidation of asphalt with time  • e.g. pavements with higher air voids age  faster

– Pavement structure (thickness, strength  of base, sub‐base and foundation)  – Mix gradation • e.g. finer mixes tend to have better  fatigue properties than coarser mixes

Fatigue Cracking Parameter |G*|sinδ • Fundamental crack propagation properties  considered too complex for specification purposes – Surrogate properties selected

• Dissipated energy per load related to fatigue  properties of binder • Dissipated energy in DSR test = Loss Modulus (G”) • Loss Modulus G” = |G*|sinδ |

τm γm

∗|

Loss Modulus (G’’)

"

δ

Storage Modulus (G’)



τm γm |G*|

δ δ

τm cos δ γm

39

2014‐06‐10

Fatigue Cracking Specification |G*|sinδPAV RESIDUE ≤ 5,000 kPa • Fatigue testing performed on PAV residue to simulate  aged pavement – Original Binder is SHORT TERM AGED in RTFO Oven – RTFO Residue subsequently LONG TERM AGED in PAV and  then tested for fatigue properties 

• Specification criteria remains |G*|sinδ remains same  for all binders and temperature at which binder is  tested varies according to Performance Grade – Tested at mean pavement temperature + 4oC – PG 58‐28 test temp = 19oC     (58‐28)/2 +4 = 19 – PG 70‐34 test temp = 22oC     (70‐34)/2 + 4 = 22

AASHTO M 320 Binder Specification

 SHORT TERM AGING

 LONG TERM AGING

• Conditioning temperature for PAV residue – 90oC for PG 52 climates and 100oC for higher temperature climates – 110oC for “desert” climates

• Temperature at which |G*|sinδ is evaluated using DSR

40

2014‐06‐10

LOW TEMPERATURE  CRACKING

World’s Longest Running Experiment • Pitch Drop Experiment (began in 1927) – Prof. Thomas Parnell – University of Queensland, Australia – Although “pitch” appears solid at room  temperature (can be shattered with hammer) – it  is actually highly viscous liquid • 8 drops have fallen since experiment began – Nobody has actually seen a drop fall – Prof. Parnell passed away in 1948 after two drops  had fallen and Prof. John Mainstone who became  the experiment’s custodian passed away in 2013   without seeing a drop fall • Missed one drop after camping out over weekend at  university (drop fell after Prof. Mainstone went home  exhausted), another missed when he went for cup of tea,  and most recent when power outage caused video camera  to fail  

• Make history – watch the 9th drop fall – http://www.theninthwatch.com/

Professor Mainstone

Pitch can be shattered with  hammer yet flows over long  period of time

41

2014‐06‐10

Low Temperature(Thermal) Cracking • Caused by low (cold) pavement  temperatures – Asphalt binder contracts in volume to greater  extent than aggregate as temperature drops – Asphalt cement stiffens and becomes more  susceptible to cracking as temperature drops – Thermal cracking occurs when stress exceeds  tensile strength of binder

• Single event crack – Temperature drops to below critical cracking  temperature of binder – Transverse crack in road (perpendicular to  direction of traffic)

• Thermal fatigue cracking – Repeated temperature cycling at temperatures  somewhat above critical cracking temperature

Transverse Thermal Cracks Perpendicular to Direction of Traffic

Measurement of Low Temperature Cracking Properties • Fundamental crack propagation properties considered too  complex for specification purposes  – Surrogate properties selected

• High stiffness of asphalt binders at low temperatures (107 – 108 Pa) not suitable for evaluation with DSR  – Stiffness of PAV binder tested with DSR is ~1 to 5x103 Pa) – High stiffness = small deformations resulting in measurement  and reproducibility problems

• Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) • Stiffness and relaxation properties of asphalt binders at low  temperatures

• Direct Tension Tester • Failure strain of asphalt binder at low temperatures

42

2014‐06‐10

Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) • Low temperature Creep Stiffness and  relaxation properties measured at constant  temperature and under constant load – 3‐point bending beam test • Performed on PAV residue after  conditioning in simulated aging RTFO and  PAV procedures – Rolling Thin Film Oven  (RTFO)  procedure simulates aging binder  undergoes when mixed with aggregate  during hot mix asphalt production – Pressure Aging Vessel (PAV) simulates  oxidative aging after several years of  service in the field • Performed at temperatures related to the  lowest anticipated temperature that  pavement is expected to reach  

Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) • Simply supported asphalt  cement beam conditioned in  low temperature fluid bath – Blunt nose shaft applies load of  0.98N (100g) to midpoint of  beam – Accurately measures deflection  over 240 seconds – Low loading level does not stress  beam to ultimate strength – Elementary Beam Theory used  to calculate Creep Stiffness and  rate of change of Creep Stiffness  with loading time

43

2014‐06‐10

Time‐Temperature Superposition • Asphalt properties  are a function of  Loading Time and  Temperature • Time‐Temperature  Superposition – Time and  Temperature are  interchangeable – Higher temperature  and shorter time =  Lower temperature  and longer time

In the above illustration the flow of asphalt  cement at 60oC for 1 hr is equal to the flow at  25oC after 10 hours.  This is the principle of  time‐temperature superposition

BBR Test Temperature • BBR temperature = +10oC above low temperature Performance Grade of  Binder – PG 58‐28 test temp = ‐18oC  – PG 64‐34 test temp=  ‐24oC • Time‐Temperature Superposition – Desired Creep Stiffness obtained after 2 hours of loading at minimum  pavement design temperature • Desired PG 58‐34 Creep Stiffness obtained after 2 hr at ‐34oC – Concept of Time‐Temperature allows same creep stiffness to be  obtained after 60 seconds at 10oC above minimum design  temperature • PG 58‐34 Creep Stiffness at ‐24oC and 60 s ≈ Creep Stiffness ‐34oC  and 2 hr • Time‐temperature superposition utilized for practical reasons to reduce  testing time from 2 hr+ to a few minutes – Underlying assumption is that time‐temperature superposition holds valid for  binders tested with BBR utilizing this principle  

44

2014‐06‐10

BBR Analysis Theory • Elementary Beam Theory – Maximum deflection (δ) for prismatic beam of  elastic material in 3‐point bending mode  occurs at midspan of beam: δ

48

δ= deflection of beam at midspan (mm) P = Applied Load (N) = 0.98N L = Span Length (mm) = 102mm E= Modulus of Elasticity (Pa) I = Moment of Inertia of Section = bh3/12 (mm4) b= Beam Width = 12.5 mm h= Beam Thickness = 6.25 mm Span to Depth ratio = 16:1 (ignore shear effects )

BBR Analysis Theory • Elastic‐Viscoelastic Correspondence Principle Assumptions – Assume that we can treat viscoelastic beam as elastic  beam – Stress distribution in viscoelastic beam = stress distribution  in elastic beam if stresses are all simultaneously applied at  zero time and held constant  – Stresses and strains are time dependent  – Replace Young’s Modulus  E in the equation for  maximum midpoint deflection of elastic beam in 3‐point  bending mode with the reciprocal of Extensional Creep  Compliance  1/D t – Extensional Creep Compliance  1/D t equals the Time  Dependent Flexural Creep Stiffness, S t ∴ E S t

45

2014‐06‐10

BBR Analysis Theory 1/



/4

3

D(t) = Time Dependent Extensional Creep Compliance S(t) = Time Dependent Flexural Creep Stiffness δ(t)= Time Dependent Beam Deflection P = Constant Load = 0.98N L = Span Length (mm) = 102mm b= Beam Width = 12.5 mm h= Beam Thickness = 6.25 mm

Maximum tensile/compressive bending stress (σ), and strain (ε): /2

σ

3

ε



/

ε



σ

















BBR Calculations Deflection δ(t) measured as function of time and value at 60s used to calculation Creep  Stiffness  : /4

3

at t = 60s

Creep stiffness calculated over range of 8 to 240s using above equation Log Creep Stiffness  S vs Time  t plotted on  graph and second order polynomial fitted to data using least squares regression log t m‐value [m t defined as rate of change of log  creep stiffness versus time.  Differentiate above  equation to determine m‐value |m t |

|

|

|

2

|

46

2014‐06‐10

BBR Low Temperature Cracking Specification Creep Stiffness at 60s loading:   S(60) ≤ 300 MPa m‐value at 60s loading:  m(60) ≥ 0.300 • Creep Stiffness and m‐value specifications remain  the same for all binders – Test temperature varies according to grade

• Test at Low Temperature Performance Grade + 10oC – e.g. Test PG 58‐28 @ ‐18oC & PG 70‐34 @ ‐24oC

• Maximum 300 MPa Creep Stiffness spec. limits  stiffness of binder at low temp to prevent cracking

Understanding m‐value  • m‐value is absolute value of slope of  log Creep Stiffness curve vs. log time  at 60s – Represents ability of binder to relax  and reduce stress build up in binder • m‐value is absolute value of slope of log Creep Stiffness curve       vs. log time at 60s – Higher m‐value = greater ability of binder to relax and reduce  stress build up in binder (note that stress decreases with time)  – Therefore ↑ decrease =  ↑absolute value in slope = ↑ m‐value • If you pull a strand of plasticine apart very quickly it will quickly break • If you pull it slowly you can stretch it to a longer length because the  plasticine has time to relax internal stress build up • Also think of pitch drop experiment (shatters when hit with hammer yet  flows slowly over time)

47

2014‐06‐10

AASHTO M 320 Specification

 BBR Testing is on PAV Residue

Direct Tension Test (DTT) • Supplementary low temperature  cracking test – BBR creep stiffness specification limits  asphalt binders to 300 MPa maximum  creep stiffness – Some binders exhibit high creep  stiffness but can stretch (exhibit low  temp ductility) considerably before  breaking

• Direct Tension measures pulls dog‐bone shaped sample  of asphalt cement binder at low temperatures and  determines creep strain at failure – Binders with Creep Stiffness 300 – 600 MPa (fail BBR  specification) but that have 1% or greater creep strain at  failure in Direct Tension test deemed acceptable 

48

2014‐06‐10

AASHTO M 320 Specification

 BBR Testing is on PAV Residue

DTT

Direct Tension Test Reproducibility Issues • Simple concept but sophisticated measurement  device – Measures very small strains at low temperatures which  requires high degree of precision and accuracy – Failure tests in which asphalt binder breaks are impart  an inherent degree of variation in test results – In practice test was found to be very irreproducible  despite significant research efforts to reduce testing  variation

• Direct Tension Test has not been widely adopted  because the inherent variation in test results make it  difficult to implement as part of a specification

49

2014‐06‐10

MOISTURE  SENSITIVITY

Moisture Damage

Asphalt cement has stripped from aggregate after conditioning in presence of water

Asphalt briquette prior to conditioning in presence of water in order to evaluate potential moisture damage

• Poor adhesion between the asphalt cement binder and  aggregate may lead to stripping (delamination of the  binder from the aggregate surface) in the presence of  water • Leads to pavement failure (ravelling, potholes, rutting)

50

2014‐06‐10

Pavement with Stripping Failure

Left Side of Asphalt Pavement Experiencing Stripping Problems

Right Side of Asphalt Pavement Performing Well

Moisture Damage • Ability of asphalt binder to coat and remain adhered to  aggregate depends on: – Chemical compatibility between asphalt cement and aggregate  surface • Aggregate surfaces have a greater affinity for water than they do  for asphalt cement – Porosity and surface texture of aggregate surface • Asphalt cement may have more difficulty adhering to smooth low  absorbing aggregates (granite, quartzite)  – Aggregates with a high dust content • Asphalt binder coats dust but not the coarse aggregate particle  surrounded by the dust – Processing Conditions • Freshly crushed aggregates may have poorer adhesion properties  than weathered aggregates (issue with high silica content agg.) • Failing to properly dry/remove the water from aggregates during  the hot mix production process can lead to stripping issues

51

2014‐06‐10

Asphalt – Aggregate Surface Chemistry • Aggregates sometimes described as basic or acidic – Basic (Limestone, Marble – low silica content) – Acidic (Granite, Quartzite – high silica content) – Very simplified model (aggregates actually contain combination  of basic and acidic groups) • Asphalt cement is acidic in nature – Napthenic acids have carboxylic acid (‐COOH) functional group • Simplified model (asphalt cement has acidic and basic  components but is more acidic than basic)  • Acidic groups in asphalt cement : – React with and adhere better to basic aggregates (limestone) with low  silica contents (“Opposites Attract”) – Exhibit poorer bonding to acidic aggregates (granite, quartzite) with high  silica contents (“Likes Repel”)

Chemical Nature of Aggregates Marble Limestone Basalt Dolomite Sandstone Granite Quartzite 0 100

Basic

Silica (SiO2) Content Calcite (CaCO3) Content

100 0

Acidic

Akzo‐Nobel – Asphalt Institute  Meeting – Spring 2002

52

2014‐06‐10

Anti‐Stripping Agents Improve Adhesion • Asphalt cement modified  with anti‐stripping agents – Amine based  chemistries are most  common – Polar head is  hydrophilic and is  attracted to aggregate  surface – Lipophilic tail is  attracted to asphalt  cement – Acts as bridge to bond  asphalt cement and  aggregate

Hydrophilic  (water loving)  polar head  attracted to  aggregate  surface

Lipophilic (oil loving) tail  attracted to asphalt cement

Akzo‐Nobel – Asphalt Institute  Meeting – Spring 2002

Magic Drop Test – Liquid Anti‐Strip in Action

Click on video to play

53

2014‐06‐10

Options to Improve Asphalt Aggregate Adhesion  • Liquid anti‐stripping agents • Treat aggregate with hydrated lime slurry – Theory is that hydrated lime (basic) reacts with  napthenic acids in asphalt cement to improve adhesion  to aggregates with higher silica contents (granite,  quartzite…)

• Allow freshly crushed aggregate time to weather – Theory is that crushing imparts electrostatic charges  onto aggregate surface and/or opens fresh reaction  sites which repel asphalt cement – Charges dissipate over time and/or reaction sites  partially react with substances in environment 

• Deep topic – we have looked at simplified view

ASPHALT MODIFICATION

54

2014‐06‐10

PG Line – Signature of Crude   PGAC properties of 3 asphalt  cements produced from 3 different crude oil sources Plot of High Temp PG vs. Low Temp PG shows what grades are feasible with each crude .

PG 70‐28

PG 58‐28

PG 58‐28 possible with Crudes A and B.  Crude C cannot produce PG 58‐28 (blue line does not cross  through PG 58‐28 box) PG 64‐22 possible with all 3 crudes (lines for A, B, C all pass  through PG 64‐22 box) PG 70‐28 cannot be produced using crude A, B, or C.  Modification of  asphalt binder produced with crude A,  B, or C required to produce PG 70‐28 (or other grades that are above the PG  line) 

Source:  Olga Puzic at Rocky Mountain User Producer Group Meeting ‐ 2005

Crude Oil & Modification Requirements for PGAC Binders

Low Temperature  Performance Grade

High Temperature Performance Grade  52

58

64

70

76

‐16

52‐16

58‐16

64‐16

70‐16

76‐16

‐22

52‐22

58‐22

64‐22

70‐22

76‐22

‐28

52‐28

58‐28

64‐28

70‐28

76‐28

‐34

52‐34

58‐34

64‐34

70‐34

76‐34

‐40

52‐40

58‐40

64‐40

70‐40

76‐40

= Crude Oil

= High Quality Crude Oil or Modifier Required

= High Quality Crude Oil

= Modifier Required

55

2014‐06‐10

Practical Requirements for AC  Modifiers • Meet Performance Grades that are not possible to  produce with straight crude oil distillation  • Improve performance properties (high temp rutting, low  temp cracking, fatigue resistance, adhesion to aggregate) • Compound with asphalt cement and remain storage  stable (it must resist separating from asphalt cement) • Produce a modified asphalt cement binder that can be  readily processed  – Viscosity is not too high to pump, able to mix with and  coat aggregate, and produces asphalt mix that can be  properly rolled and compacted • Cost effective and (readily) available 

Common Asphalt Cement Modifiers • Modern specifications are very demanding & while many different  modifiers may be used, some common modifiers include: – Thermoplastic Elastomers (elastomeric polymers) • SBS (Styrene‐Butadiene‐Styrene) • SB (Styrene‐Butadiene) • Elvaloy RET (custom designed polymer from DuPont) • SBR (Styrene‐Butadiene‐Rubber) – Thermoplastic Plastomers (polyolefins or plastic polymers) • EVA (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate) • Polyethylene and derivatives • Customized waxes – Polyphosphoric acid (often in combination with polymer) – Recycled crumb tire rubber

56

2014‐06‐10

SBS Block Copolymer • SBS (Styrene‐Butadiene‐Styrene) is one of the most if  not the most prevalent asphalt modifiers  • Thermoplastic elastomer – Elastic at low and intermediate temperatures  – Plastic (flows and can be moulded) when heated  (thermo) to high temperatures • In practice, mechanical mixing/shearing is also often  required

SBS Polymer Properties • Polystyrene (PS) is a rigid  and brittle polymer  – i.e. polystyrene foam  board insulation panels  snap when bent • Polybutadiene (PB) – Soft rubber • Styrene‐Butadiene‐Styrene  (SBS) – Properties of PS and PB  combine to produce a tough, elastic polymer

57

2014‐06‐10

Simplified SBS Modified Asphalt Production Process

SBS polymer pellets introduced into hot asphalt cement and circulated  through high shear mill to produce a concentrate. SBS softens and swells. Combination of high temperature, high shear, and  time “dissolves” SBS in liquid asphalt cement. SBS concentrate diluted to required concentration, combined with any other  required additives, and often chemically stabilized to ensure the SBS does not  Heatec product literature phase separate from the asphalt cement.

Miscibility of SBS and Asphalt Cement Microscopic Slides Showing Unstable Dispersion of SBS in Asphalt Cement 

Immediately after Mixing/Shearing

After 2 minutes

After 5 minutes

In practice, SBS and asphalt cement are  often not miscible and will phase  separate even after high shear mixing. SBS can be stabilized in asphalt cement  by adjusting asphalt cement chemistry  or by chemically bonding the SBS  polymer molecules to reactive  molecules within the asphalt cement.

58

2014‐06‐10

Storage Stable SBS Modified Asphalt Cement

Cross‐linked (stabilized)  SBS modified asphalt cement SBS contains a double bond in the polybutadiene portion of the molecule which can react and allow the SBS polymer to  form a chemical bond with reactive molecules within asphalt cement. Reacting or “cross‐linking” SBS with asphalt cement is a means to  produce a modified asphalt cement that is stable in storage.

MSCR TEST

59

2014‐06‐10

How well does G*/sinδ correlate to rutting in the field? I‐80 Highway in Nevada  Two asphalt mixes:  same aggregate gradation  but different asphalt binder

PG 63‐22 polymer modified  No rutting

PG 67‐22 neat (unmodified)  15mm rutting

• PG 67‐22 should have performed better than PG 63‐22 – High temperature rutting parameter G*/sinδ does fully capture  ability of polymer modified asphalt cements to resist permanent  deformation (rutting) – G*/sinδ appears to work better for unmodified binders Danny Gierhart, PE – Asphalt Institute SEAUPG MSCR Task Group Web Meeting August 25, 2011

Rutting:  Non‐Linear Viscoelastic Deformation Rutting results in extensive deformation (strain)  which is in the non‐linear region for G* and δ (i.e. G* and δ are not constant with respect to strain  at these strain levels)

• High temperature rutting parameter G*/sinδ assumes a linear  viscoelastic material – i.e. assumes G* and δ do not depend on strain for the low strain  levels used in the test • Reality is that rutted pavements experience high strain levels  beyond the linear viscoelastic range for polymer modified asphalts – Low strains used when measuring G*/sinδ do not give polymer chains in  polymer modified asphalt cement a chance to  “stretch” enough for them  to “show their stuff” and distinguish themselves from an unmodified  asphalt cement with a similar stiffness  

60

2014‐06‐10

Multiple Stress Creep Recovery Test (MSCR) • Performed using DSR applying  stress in unidirectional motion   Load – DSR does not oscillate Rest – Moves in 1 direction  – High strain levels are beyond  linear viscoelastic region • Apply 1s Creep Stress (load) at  0.1 kPa followed by 9s rest  period – Material creeps under stress  and then partially recovers  during rest period • Repeat 10x at 0.1 kPa Creep  Stress level • Increase to 3.2 kPa Creep Stress  Creep level and repeat 10x

Recovery John D’Angelo – Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)Presentation

MSCR Creep Strain Response

• MSCR test measures non‐recoverable shear strain – Expressed as non‐recoverable creep compliance (Jnr)

• MSCR test measures recoverable shear strain – Expressed as % Recovery

Mike Anderson – Asphalt Institute – MAAPT Conference December 2013

61

2014‐06‐10

Non‐Recoverable Creep Compliance (Jnr)

• Modulus = Stress / Strain • Compliance = Strain / Stress (reciprocal of modulus) • Jnr = Non‐Recoverable Creep Compliance Mike Anderson – Asphalt Institute – MAAPT Conference December 2013

Calculating Jnr in MSCR Test

• Jnr calculated for each of 10 cycles at 0.1 kPa shear stress and  average Jnr 0.1kPa reported • Jnr calculated for each of 10 cycles at 0.3 kPa shear stress and  average Jnr 0.3kPa reported Mike Anderson – Asphalt Institute – MAAPT Conference December 2013

62

2014‐06‐10

Calculating % Recovery in MSCR Test

• % Recovery calculated for each of 10 cycles at 3.2  kPa shear stress and average % Recovery is reported

MSCR % Recovery 100

Binders with % Recovery values above the curve are considered to have significant elastic recovery properties

90 % Recovery ‐ 3.2 kPa (%)

80 70

% Recovery criteria is not relevant for Jnr>2 kPa‐1 (binder is likely unmodified)

60 50

29.371 (Jnr)‐0.2633

40 30 20 10

Binders with % Recovery values below the curve are not considered to have significant elastic recovery properties

0 0

0.5

1

1.5

2

2.5

3

3.5

4

Jnr ‐‐ 3.2 kPa (kPa‐1)

• Asphalt cement binders are viscoelastic materials with “built‐ in” elastic recovery properties.   – Inherent % recovery increases as binder becomes stiffer  (i.e. as Jnr decreases) • Required % Recovery must be ≥ 29.371(Jnr)‐0.2633  for binder to  considered as significantly modified with elastomeric modifier

63

2014‐06‐10

MSCR Test Identifies Differences in Polymer Network 4% Linear SBS

4% Radial SBS from  concentrate 

• •



4% Linear SBS + 0.5% PPA

4% Radial SBS  from  concentrate + 0.5% PPA

SBS polymer modified PG 64‐22 asphalt cement (refined from Saudi Light Crude by Lion Oil) – SBS is compatible with this asphalt cement and does not separate for a long time LC 4 – 4% Linear SBS – discrete polymer particles – Highest Jnr and lowest % recovery – Adding 0.5% Polyphosphoric  Acid (PPA) causes polymer strands to develop in LC4 P ‐ Jnr decreases and % recovery increases LOP 4 – 4% Radial SBS diluted from 15% concentrate down to 4% SBS content – More uniform dispersion than LC4 and some bulking – lower Jnr and higher % recovery – Adding 0.5% PPA causes even more uniform dispersion in LOP 4P – Jnr decreases and %  recovery increases    John D’Angelo – Transportation Research Board TRB E‐C147 Developments in Asphalt Specifications ‐ 2010

MSCR Specifications • Test RTFO residue at climatic temperature for region and  adjust the specified value of Jnr 3.2 (at 3.2 kPa‐1) to account  for traffic loading – Cutting Jnr in half approximately reduces rutting by half

• Southern Ontario:  58oC is designated as the maximum  design pavement temperature  – – – –

PG 58S‐xx  PG 58H‐xx PG 58V‐xx PG 58E‐xx

Jnr 3.2< 4   S = Standard <10 Million ESAL Jnr 3.2 < 2  H = Heavy 10‐30 Million ESAL Jnr 3.2 < 1 V = Very heavy >30 Million ESAL Jnr 3.2<0.5 E = Extreme >30 Million ESAL  & standing traffic

• If elastomeric modifier is required: % Recovery ≥ 29.371 (Jnr)‐0.2633

64

2014‐06‐10

ASPHALT  RECYCLING

Asphalt Recycling  • Asphalt is among most recycled materials in North America  (more than plastic, aluminum, paper) • Asphalt pavements can be 100% recycled at the end of their  life – RAP = Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement • Ontario used 2.3 million tonne of RAP in 2010 – 200,000 tonne CO2 reduction + preservation of finite  aggregate resources and asphalt cement • Asphalt Pavements  are engineered to perform with a  recycled (RAP) component – Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) permits up to 20%  RAP in surface course & up to 40% RAP in binder course – Average Ontario pavement contains 17% RAP www.OHMPA.org

65

2014‐06‐10

Summary • • • • • •

Superpave and PGAC Binder Specification  Chemistry (SARA) Short (RTFO) and Long Term (PAV) Aging  Hot Asphalt Cement (Viscosity, Flashpoint) Rheology (Viscoelastic Behaviour) Pavement Distresses – Rutting (G*/sinδ and MSCR) – Fatigue Cracking (G*sinδ) – Low Temperature Cracking (BBR Creep Stiffness & m‐value) – Moisture Damage  • Asphalt Recycling

QUESTIONS  & DISCUSSION Contact Information: Steve Manolis, P.Eng. General Manager Coco Asphalt Engineering A Division of Coco Paving Inc. [email protected] O 416‐633‐9670 M 416‐708‐5468   www.cocoasphaltengineering.com

66

Comments