John C. Kimball High School - tracy.k12.ca.us

922kB Size 7 Downloads 3 Views

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL in TRACY UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT A comprehensive public school, openning its doors in the fall of 2009-10 school year to …
JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

John C. Kimball High School Progress Visit Report 3200 Jaguar Run Tracy, CA 95376 Tracy Unified School District February 9, 2017 Accrediting Commission for Schools Western Association of Schools and Colleges

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

1

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

I: Student/Community Profile Data JOHN C. KIMBALL MISSION STATEMENT To prepare our students for successful transition to college and career. JOHN C. KIMBALL VISION The vision of Kimball High School is to build a physically and emotionally safe educational institution that is student-driven and centered on academic achievement.

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL in TRACY UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT A comprehensive public school, openning its doors in the fall of 2009-10 school year to 918 students and 65 staff members, Kimball High School is located on the corner of Lammers Road and Eleventh Street in suburban Tracy, California. John C. Kimball High School is named after Dr. John C. Kimball, a longtime Tracyite, medical physician, and pillar in our community; he served as Tracy High School’s and West High School’s voluntary attending physician for over thirty years. Kimball High School is the third comprehensive high school in Tracy Unified School District servicing South Tracy’s student population. Kimball High School, home of the Jaguars, currently serves a socially and ethnically diverse population. The City of Tracy’s population size is 83,000. Tracy is sixty miles east of San Francisco. As of 2012, the median household income for Tracy is $69,514. Students in the 10th, 11th and 12th grades at Kimball High are enrolled in a Pathway based on their current passions and future interests. The three pathways are: Architecture, Construction and Interior Design Pathway, Health and Education Pathway, and Communications Pathway. The 2016-17 school year realized the phasing out of pathways, and introduced the Medical Health Services Academy. The Design Team (comprised of three teachers, a counselor and an assistant principal) for the Medical and Health Services Academy at John C. Kimball spent the 2015-16 school year planning for the opening of the academy. The planning was extensive: we met with staff at our site, visited other schools, researched the job needs in the community, and worked as a Design Team, all of which laid the foundation for a Medical Academy at Kimball. This August, the academy opened its doors to nearly seventy freshmen and staff. The curriculum is evolving and purposeful within each academy course— English, Biology, Health Concepts I, Algebra and Physical Education. The medical theme is ever-present from academy class to academy class. And, yet, even more important is the idea of team, of belonging. The AVID (Advancement via Individual Determination) program at John C. Kimball reaches out to students who are in the middle. With the added support of the AVID class—and AVID team—students dive into more rigorous courses, work toward effective notetaking strategies, learn how to navigate the college application and FASFA so that they are ready for college and beyond. Kimball offers eight CTE programs: Modern Carpentry, Video Production, Technical Drawing, Computer Applications, Print Shop, Marketing, Medical Terminology and Sports Medicine. In each program, students learn and apply skills and concepts in specific career areas. Additionally, three new courses were added in the 2016-2017 school year: Piano, Video Game Design and Computer Science.

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

2

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

The school’s goal is to meet the needs of our diverse student population and to engage students in activities that complement their academic programs. Kimball High School offers a full range of extracurricular programs including athletics, student government, and a wide variety of clubs and organizations for student to join including (not limited to): HOSA, Jaguar Project, and Bollywood Club. KHS recognizes the importance of working with the local Tracy community; to that end Kimball partners with the Student Discovery Program of Tracy, Sow-A-Seed, and the Restoration Center to provide additional supports to students. It is the vision and purpose of Kimball High School to build a physically and emotionally safe educational institution that is student-driven and centered on academic achievement. Our goal is to inspire all students to reach their full potential; a school where all members of the school community—including staff, students, and parents—respect each other and work together to achieve our educational goals.

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

3

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

JAGUAR CODE The WASC Leadership team in 2014-2015 reframed the outdated ESLRs into Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) which were reviewed by the faculty and staff that same year. At Freshmen Orientation SLOs are introduced to incoming parents. Additionally, in 2016-17 Kimball’s Media Production class incorporated Kimball’s SLOs into segments shown during second period announcements. SLOs are posted in every classroom and the KHS website. SLOs (formerly known as ESLRS) Jags will Demonstrate Respect Respect Diversity Respect Time Commitments Respect yourself and each other Respect Environment Rise to Rigor Listen, Speak, Read and Write using academic language Meet high expectations with support and interventions as needed Interpret meaning from conflicting data Academic Competency Build Relationships Students will learn and apply positive strategies for problem resolution Communicate responsibly and work effectively in a world of diverse viewpoints, belief system and cultures Community contributors Apply Relevance Connect learning to real-world challenges and opportunities Recognize that decisions and actions have consequences Understand options during and following high school Use technology to deliver academic thought

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

4

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

Staff Characteristics

 

Number of classroom teachers Number and type of support certificated staff (including special education staff) Number of classified staff Number/percent of NCLB highly qualified teachers Number/percent of teachers with EL Certification Enrollment John C. Kimball’s enrollment for the 2016-17 school year is 1500. Source 2013-14

2015/16 65 8

2016/17 61 5

30 99% 100%

30 n/a 95%

2014-15

2015-2016

Enrollment (#)

Oct CBEDS

2188

1770

1588

AFDC/Free & Reduced (%)

Oct CBEDS

29.84%

26%

35%

English Learners R-30 (%)

Oct CBEDS

198/8.9%

146/8.3%

119/7.5%

Fluent English (FEP/R-FEP) (%) Ethnicity:

Oct CBEDS

531/23.9%

432/21.9%

433/27.3%

African American Asian Filipino Hispanic Native American

Oct CBEDS Oct CBEDS Oct CBEDS Oct CBEDS Oct CBEDS

8.54% 16.09% 11.0% 31.68% .64%

8.05% 27.42%

7.18% 27.20%

included with Asian

30.48% 0.68%

32.30% 0.31%

Pacific Islander

Oct CBEDS

1.01%

0.91%

0.88%

White

Oct CBEDS

25.71%

25.72%

27.02%

Multiple

Oct CBEDS

5.92%

6.74%

5.10%

Attendance School Year

2013-14 2014-15 2015-16

Actual Attendance %

Target %

95.97 96.25 96.38

98% 98% 98%

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

Difference from target (+ or -) -2.03 -1.79 -1.62

included with Asian

Target Met Yes or No N N N

5

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

Suspension and Expulsion Rates Kimball High School, in conjunction with Tracy Unified School District, has implemented a progressive discipline model to keep students in class and to meet its mission of student success. 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Decrease or Increase Target in % of Students Met # % # % # % 126 5.8 145 8.2 80 5.0 -3.2 Y Suspensions 54 2.5 113 6.4 70 4.4 Students Suspended 8 .5 9 .5 9 .6 +.1 Y Expulsions 8 .5 9 .5 9 .6 Students Expelled # Number of incidents of suspension (# of individual students suspended during the year). Some students were suspended more than one time during the year. Academic Performance Index (API) API – Academic Performance Index: With the suspension of STAR testing there is no growth target set for 2014. The state released a three-year average API score which averages the Growth API from 2011-2013. The table below shows the significant subgroups at Kimball High School. Group 2011 Growth 2012 Growth 2013 Growth 3 Year Weighted* API API API Average API School Total 805 801 795 800 Subgroup #1 Hispanic Subgroup #2 White Not Hispanic Subgroup #3 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Subgroup #4 English Learners Sub-group #5 Stu. w/ Disabilities

761

752

744

752

831

831

815

826

761

749

744

751

761

737

712

736

555

595

592

582

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

6

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

2013 % Prof. Math ( 89.5%) ( 88.7%)

2014 % Prof. Math (100%) HS Only

School Total

66.4

64.5

65.9

N

63.8

67.8

Y

Sub-group #1 Hispanic or Latino Sub-Group #2 White not Hispanic Sub-Group #3 Socioecon. Disadv. Sub-group #4 ELL students Sub-group #5 Stu. w/ Disabilities Sub-group #7 African American

78.7

52.2

53.4

Y

53.0

48.5

57.7

Y

52.7

68.9

71.5

Y

73.0

71.2

72.3

Y

78.3

51.7

55.1

Y

53.9

54.7

55.8

Y

52.3

43.4

50.4

53.6

52.8

57.7

Y

50.9

13.2

11.8

20.8

23.7

9.6

52.2

48.8

53.3

58.7

42.9

51.1

5% growth Goal Met?

2014 % Prof. ELA (100%) HS Only

(NCLB target) ES/MS HS

2012 % Prof. Math ( 79.0%) ( 77.4%) 64.1

AYP Goal Met?

2013 % Prof. ELA ( 89.2%) ( 89.9%)

Group

5% growth Goal Met?

2012 % Prof. ELA ( 78.4%) ( 77.8%)

AYP Goal Met?

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

Achievement Gap Data Longitudinal AYP 2010 – 2013/2014  English Language Arts The Achievement Gap is calculated by subtracting the subgroup AYP from the White subgroup AYP. ELA 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

target ES/HS 56.8/55.6 67.6/66.7 78.4/77.8 89.2/89.9 100 Change

School AYP 60.9 77.8 66.4 64.5 65.9 +1.4

White AYP 67.6 83.5 78.3 68.9 71.5 +2.6

Afr.Amer. AYP Gap 37.5 -30.1 58.5 -25.0 58.7 -19.6 48.8 -20.1 53.3 -18.2 +4.5 -1.9

Hispanic AYP Gap 52.3 -15.3 65.3 -18.2 52.7 -25.6 52.7 -16.2 53.4 -18.1 +0.7 +1.9

Low SES AYP Gap 63.9 -3.7 67.6 -15.9 52.3 -26.0 57.9 -17.0 55.1 -16.4 -2.8 +0.6

EL AYP 50.0 65.4 50.9 43.4 50.4 +7.0

Gap -17.6 -18.1 -27.4 -25.5 -21.1 -4.4

Stu w/Dis AYP Gap 22.7 -44.9 NA 20.8 -57.5 13.2 -55.7 11.8 -59.7 -1.4 +4.0

Longitudinal AYP 2010 – 2013/2014  Math The Achievement Gap is calculated by subtracting the subgroup AYP from the White subgroup AYP. Math 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Target ES/HS 58.0/54.8 68.5/66.1 79.0/77.4 89.5/88.7 100 Change

School AYP 53.2 66.9 64.1 63.8 67.8 +4.0

White AYP 53.4 69.8 73.00 71.2 72.3 +1.1

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

Afr.Amer. AYP Gap 37.5 -15.9 52.8 -17.0 58.7 -14.3 42.9 -28.3 51.1 -21.2 +8.2 -7.1

Hispanic AYP Gap 46.5 -6.9 58.2 -11.6 53.0 -20.0 48.5 -22.7 57.7 -14.6 +9.2 -8.1

Low SES AYP Gap 51.2 -2.2 57.5 -12.6 53.6 -19.4 53.3 -17.9 55.8 -16.5 +2.5 -1.4

EL AYP 48.4 61.5 53.9 52.8 57.7 +4.9

Gap -5.0 -8.3 -19.1 -18.4 -14.6 -3.8

Stu w/Dis AYP Gap 20.0 -33.4 NA NA 20.8 23.7 -47.5 9.6 -62.7 -14.1 +15.2

7

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

AYP - Adequate Yearly Progress – Participation: Schools will have a 95% participation rate in state testing – H.S. Only for CAHSEE grade 10 testing. Group % Target % Target % Target % Target Tested Met Tested Met Tested Met Tested Met ELA Yes or Math Yes or ELA Yes or Math Yes or 2014 No 2014 No 2015 No 2015 No School Total 99% Y 99% Y 98% Yes 98% Yes Subgroup #1 98% Y 98% Y 96% Yes 96% Yes Hispanic Subgroup #2 99% Y 99% Y 100% Yes 100% Yes White Not Hispanic Subgroup #3 99% Y 99% Y 97% Yes 98% Yes Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Subgroup #4 100% Y 100% Y 94% No 97% Yes English Learners Sub-group #5 97% Y 99% Y 100% Yes 100% Yes Stu. w/ Disabilities Program Improvement Status for 2014/15: X Not in PI in PI year Note: PI Status for 2014-15 remains the same as for 2013-14 due to suspension of STAR testing and no new AYP data being released for elementary or middle schools. CAASPP— 2016 ELA Overall Achievement Standard Exceeded-Level 4 Standard Met-Level 3 Standard Nearly Met-Level 2 Standard Not Met-Level 1 Reading Area Performance Level Above Standard Near Standard Below Standard Writing Area Performance Level Above Standard Near Standard Below Standard Listening Area Performance Level Above Standard Near Standard Below Standard

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

Percent of Students 28% 34% 23% 16% Percent of Students 30% 53% 17% Percent of Students 41% 43% 16% Percent of Students 19% 64% 17%

8

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

Research/Inquiry Area Performance Level Above Standard Near Standard Below Standard

2016-2017

Percent of Students 39% 50% 12%

CAASPP— 2016 Math Overall Achievement Standard Exceeded-Level 4 Standard Met-Level 3 Standard Nearly Met-Level 2 Standard Not Met-Level 1 Concepts & Procedures Area Performance Level Above Standard Near Standard Below Standard Problem Solving and Modeling & Data Analysis Area Performance Level Above Standard Near Standard Below Standard Communicating Reasoning Area Performance Level Above Standard Near Standard Below Standard

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

Percent of Students 13% 24% 30% 33% Percent of Students 27% 34% 39% Percent of Students 16% 55% 29% Percent of Students 19% 58% 23%

9

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

Early Assessment Program (EAP): Kimball High School has had a steady increase in its students that are ready for college from 2011 to 2014. The total number of students tested has, also, increased from 319 students in 2011 to 443 students in 2014. In 2014-15, the Smarter Balance Assessment embedded the EAP into the 11th grade state exam. English EAP scores improved slightly in 2015-16. Math EAP scores decreased twenty percent. The math department continues to explore and implement strategies like Rigorous Curriculum Design units to ensure that Kimball’s students are college and career ready. Early Assessment Program (EAP) - 2013 Early Assessment of Readiness for College English Students Tested Ready for College Ready for College - Conditional Did Not Demonstrate College Readiness on This Assessment Early Assessment of Readiness for College Mathematics (Total) Students Tested Ready for College Ready for College – Conditional Did Not Demonstrate College Readiness on This Assessment

EAP 499 143 95 261 EAP 246 33 151 62

Early Assessment Program (EAP) - 2014 Early Assessment of Readiness for College English Students Tested Ready for College Ready for College - Conditional Did Not Demonstrate College Readiness on This Assessment Early Assessment of Readiness for College Mathematics (Total) Students Tested Ready for College Ready for College – Conditional Did Not Demonstrate College Readiness on This Assessment

Participation 100% 29% 19% 52% Participation 74% 13% 61% 25%

EAP 443 126 75 242 EAP 263 29 127 107

Participation 100% 28% 17% 55% Participation 11% 48% 41%

Early Assessment Program (EAP) - 2015 Early Assessment of Readiness for College English Students Tested

EAP

Participation

346

93%

Ready for College

97

28%

Ready for College - Conditional

118

34%

Did Not Demonstrate College Readiness on This Assessment

131

38%

Early Assessment of Readiness for College Mathematics Students Tested

EAP

Participation

356

95%

Ready for College

48

13%

Ready for College – Conditional

84

24%

Did Not Demonstrate College Readiness on This Assessment

224

63%

Advanced Placement (AP) Currently, Kimball offers a variety of AP classes. Our AP teachers attend workshops and summer institutes as needed to keep the program current with the latest strategies and curricular developments. Percentage of AP Students w/ 3+ Year Kimball High School California/Global 2014 71.2% 64.2% / 61.3% 2015 73% 63.6% / 60.7% JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

10

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016

73%

2016-2017

62.5% / 60.3%

A-G Requirements John C. Kimball High School continues to work on A-G requirement completion rates with the focus on appropriate instructional support for enrolled students.

2011-12

# Met A-G n/a

Percent ( 12 grade students) n/a

2012-13

81

25.2

2013-14

161

36.9

2014-15

145

32.6

2015-16

145

34.6

th

Completion Rates/Graduation Rates The goal of Kimball High School is: 100% of students will receive a high school diploma or equivalent certificate. Kimball High School has not yet met that goal. # Graduates 2014 Enrollment (Seniors) H.S Diploma Certif of Compl (IEP) GED

% Receiving Diploma or Equivalent 498

# Graduates 2015

% Receiving Diploma or Equivalent 446

# Graduates 2016

487

444

505

7

2

3

% Receiving Diploma or Equivalent 511

Adult School Diploma Total Percent Goal Met?

494

446

508

99.2%

99.5%

99.4%

No

No

No

AYP Graduation Rate NCLB Grad Rate NCLB Grad Rate (2011-12 School (2012-13 School Year) Year) 2013 2014 AYP Target Site %

NCLB Grad Rate (2013-14 School Year)

NCLB Grad Rate (2014-15 School Year)

90%

90%

90%

90%

94.7

95.2

95.01

96.2

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

11

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

Goal Met?

Y

Y

2016-2017

Y

Y

AYP Graduation Rate – Subgroup Data

Asian Filipino Hispanic AA White E.L. SES Dis.

NCLB Grad Rate (2012-13 School Year) 2014

NCLB Grad Rate (2013-14 School Year) 2015

NCLB Grad Rate (2014-15 School Year) 2016

95.1 100.0 94.2 86.1 98.0 85.2 92.5

100 98.2 94.6 96 98 85.7 92.5

97.2 98.1 93.4 97.6 95.7 87.6 n/a

Exploring the Data What factors influenced the twenty percent decrease from conditionally ready to not yet ready in EAP math scores? Continue work to ensure that student’s A-G requirement completion rates improves with appropriate instructional support. Continue work on the analysis of data to drive student achievement. Continue to support EL, AP and Special Education Programs to ensure student success. II: Significant Changes and Developments 1. Kimball High School is phasing out pathways and incorporating an academy. 2. Kimball High School has experienced a transition in both administrative staff and faculty since the 2014-15 school year. From December of 2015, when Mr. Robert Pecot became principal, to each school year following changes in administration have occurred. There are two new assistant principals and nine new teachers at Kimball this school year. 4. With the advent of California Standards, the mathematics department has undergone a significant change in its curriculum. Two years ago, Tracy Unified School District selected the Carnegie Learning curriculum. The Carnegie Learning program has a computer application that assists students in independent learning. The transition has been difficult for students, parents, and teachers because of the emphasis on conceptual thinking over math skills. Last year, our math teachers were enrolled in Carnegie Learning’s workshops to assist with student learning. As a result, every math class has a laptop cart for use by students in the classroom. In 2015-16 the district implemented Houghton-Mifflin math curriculum. In addition, math is designing Rigorous Curriculum Development units. English-Language Arts adopted Rigorous Curriculum Development in all grades. Teachers will give the same pre-tests, formative assessments, and post-tests to gauge student learning within and across grade levels.

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

12

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

5. Our suspension numbers have fallen significantly because of a progressive (tiered) discipline matrix that Tracy Unified School District has implemented. When teachers refer students to the administrative office, the assistant principals work with the student, contact parents, and attempt to reduce recurring incidents. Reduction in suspension numbers mean that more students are in the classrooms learning the curriculum. III: Ongoing School Improvement In October of the 2015-16 school year John C. Kimball High School had a Mid-Cycle Visit. As reported by the Visiting WASC Committee, the following commendations and recommendations were made: Commendations: Survey requesting input from all stakeholders on success of school programs Restructuring committee to review current pathway program and to design and implement a program which will benefit all students Improved communication Improved faculty/administration relations Improved school climate across all stakeholders Improved scheduling flexibility addressing student concerns in survey responses Recommendations: 1. Continue to focus on ensuring that students' A-G requirement completion rates will improve with appropriate instructional support for enrolled students 2. Continue focus group meeting work 3. Continue professional development on Common Core State Standards 4. Continue to improve awareness of the needs of special education students in general education classes. 5. Continuity in AVID program (e.g. 4-year completion) 6. KHS needs to make a definitive choice for the 2016-17 school year whether to continue to offer a pathway program, or move to a different educational model Recommendation 1. Continue to focus on ensuring that students’ A-G requirement completion rates will improve with appropriate instructional support for enrolled students— During the 2010-2011 school year, Kimball High School embarked on a Data Teams project that was directed by TUSD Staff Development and implemented at each school in the district using early release staff development time. The focus has evolved continually as the district and sites work to find JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

13

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

the most productive model. The following are steps that Kimball High School has taken on behalf of TUSD regarding its Data Teams and PLCs. In 2011-12, teachers identified target students (EL and minority populations) to shift their CST and CAHSEE scores from basic to proficient. Initially, the teams chose a focus and planned to assess the needs of the target students through a series of pre-tests, lessons, and post-tests. After each data cycle, the team of teachers discussed and analyzed the data from their cohorts of target students. The TUSD initiative required teachers to complete three data cycles that year. For the 2011-12 school year, Data Teams continued and previous teams had the option to continue with last year’s team or form a new team. The purpose of the 2011-12 Data Teams was horizontal integration between homogenous subjects. To observe and evaluate the Data Teams work, data minutes rubrics were provided by the district. In addition, a Critical Issues for Team Consideration survey was given to each teacher and team. The survey highlighted the benefits and areas for growth that each team encountered the previous year. There was one modification from the previous year, two data cycles were required instead of three data cycles. For the 2012-13 school year, an action plan for Data Teams was initiated with the same emphasis as the previous year. As a part of the modifications for the year, a minutes’ form was given to every group and the emphasis was on formative, summative, and benchmark assessments. At the beginning of the 2013-14 school year, the Data Team moniker changed to Professional Learning Communities (PLC). With an emphasis on the new Common Core Standards, the purpose of the PLCs also developed to assist teachers with the integration of the standards into their curriculum. The curricular resources utilized were Authentic Resources, Writing across the Curriculum, and Relationships, Rigor, and Relevance. 2015-2016 the Professional Learning Communities continued to be a focus in the district and at the site. Administration worked on guiding the groups to focus on student work as the data to move students forward. The teachers were provided the following parameters regarding PLC time: communities are department driven, they are in control of their PLC, and PLC time will be scheduled and honored. The structure was to have a common goal/focus that centers on looking at student work. A rotating facilitator led the discussion with a minute keeper to send the notes to administration. The intent was to have PLCs exploring ways to improve student success in all classes including A-G courses. An assistant principal collected five years of semester one grades for all math teachers. The data was graphed to show the number of students in their A-G math class that met and did not meet the A-G requirement. The assistant principal and each math teacher reviewed the data and strategized ways to have more students in math complete the A-G math requirements. 2016-2017 the work of the Professional Learning Communities continues. During the summer and fall two groups of administrators (Kimball’s principal and an assistant principal included) and district office representatives attended a PLC conference hosted by the Dufours. PLCs remain a focus at the district this school year. At the site, teacher groups started this school year with an activity, Class at a Glance, looking at the students in their classes and the grades each student is earning. Through Rigorous Curriculum Design in English and math, PLCs do examine student data to continue to support all students in all classes including A-G courses. In addition to PLCs, Early Release Monday’s often include time to collaborate in departments and across grade levels. This year, teams like AVID and the Medical Health Services Academy have built JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

14

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

in time during the school day with common preps. Each team meets at least weekly with all teachers, the counselor and the assistant principal present. A focus of each meeting is student achievement.

Recommendation 2. Continue focus group meeting work— In the 2013-14 school year, Dr. Domenichelli the principal, the site’s WASC Coordinator, and Michael Stagnaro attended a WASC preparation meeting. At the beginning of the 2014-15 school year, Dr. Domenichelli moved to another school district leaving the site’s WASC Coordinator to collect, analyze, and write about the progress of Kimball High School. Although the Coordinator attempted to bring together educators to assist with the input, she was unsuccessful. Mr. Stagnaro and the Coordinator met beginning in October of the 2014-15 school year for updates and input. At the request of Kimball High School’s interim principal, the then head counselor, Jodiann Beeson, and assistant principal, Michael Stagnaro, with the support of the school site secretary, Michelle Sterritt, initiated a WASC Leadership Team with six certificated teachers who have various roles at the site. The teachers represent expertise in Pathways, teaming, AVID, EL, AP, CTE, and Special Education. The newly formed WASC Leadership Team’s focus was to answer the Critical Areas for Follow-Up beginning in November 2014. With the arrival of Principal Robert Pecot in December of 2014, the WASC Leadership Team and Focus Groups were provided the direction, the time, and the space to create an Action Plan to move Kimball forward. In 2015-16 school year the WASC Leadership Team included now Assistant Principal Jodiann Beeson and Assistant Principal Mike Stagnaro. In 2016-17, Mr. Stagnaro moved into a principal position in a neighboring district. And, two teachers replaced two others (one because of change in employment, and the other because of time commitment) on the Leadership Team. Since the creation of both a WASC Leadership Team and Focus Groups in the winter of 2014-2015 school year, the Leadership Team and the Focus Groups met and continue to meet on a regular basis. This school year, 2016-17, the Leadership Team and Focus Groups re-worked the Action Plan to reflect the work done and the work that still needs to be done to ensure meeting the recommendations of the WASC Visiting Committee.

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

15

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

DA T E

PRO J EC T PH A S E WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS

12.15.2014

WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS

1.05.2015

WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING (6

TH

1.08.2015

PER)

WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS

1.12.2015

WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS

2.2.2015

WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING (6TH PER) WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS – COMPLETE 1

2.05.2015 ST

DRAFT

3.2.2015

WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING (5TH PER)

3.04.2015

WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS – SHARE DRAFT WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING (5th Per)

3.23.2015 4.20.2015 4.22.2015 5.4.2015

WASC TEAM MEETINGS—FINAL DRAFT DUE SHARE REPORT WITH STAFF SHARE REPORT WITH STAFF REPORT DUE TO ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT TUSD BOARD MEETING WASC REPORT SUBMITTED WASC REVIEW VISIT WASC LEADERSHIP TEAM MEETING WHOLE STAFF UPDATE WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING WASC LEADERSHIP MEETING WITH DISTRICT WASC FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS DISTRICT REVIEW OF ACTION PLAN WASC FOCUS GROUPS MEETINGS WASC REVIEW VISIT WASC FOCUS GROUPS MEETINGS WASC 2016-17 WRAP-UP

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

5.18.2015 8.10.2015 8.12.2015 8.25.2015 9.1.2015 10.19-20.2015 10.28.2015 11.2.2015 11.4.2015 2.1.2016 8.29.2016 9.1.2016 9.27.2016 10.3.2016 10.20.2016 11.18.2016 11.28.2016 12.1.2016 1.9.2017 2.9.2017 3.6.2017 5.15.2017

16

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

Recommendation 3. Continue professional development on Common Core State Standards— Tracy Unified School District has been at the forefront since Common Core was adopted by the state. The district has consultants and district experts teach teachers and administrators. All the district Buy-Back days include a presenter that focuses on Common Core. And, at least once a month an Early Release Monday allows for teachers to work together around curriculum including Rigorous Curriculum Design and NGSS. In the 2014-15 school year, the district asked English teachers to participate in designing Rigorous Curriculum Design lessons. The teachers, in grade levels, created RCD units. The following year, all English teachers used the RCD framework to guide their instruction. Design Teams have begun the process of creating RCD units for math to be implemented in the 2017-18 school year. The district has partnered with the Office of STEM at SJCOE to work with science teachers regarding NGSS. In 2013-14 the science teachers started work on concept maps of NGSS with the work continuing the 2014-15 school year. Reviewing possible models for implementation of NGSS (3-course model or 4-course model) started in 2015-16, and at the end of the year it was determined a 3-course model would be implemented in TUSD. This school year, discussions are of what the 3-course model will look like. The current thinking is that it will be biology, chemistry and physics with Earth science integrated—to ensure all standards for all students. Three Kimball science teachers are part of the District’s Science Committee. The focus of the discussions of the Science Committee are: 5E lessons, science notebooks, planning and conducting investigations, incorporating engineering, assessments. This school year, with the district’s renewed focus on instruction and curriculum, Principal Robert Pecot assigned an assistant principal to work with him to move instruction and curriculum forward and to ensure that curriculum is standards-based at the site. Additionally, the district has mandated that administration spend thirty percent of the day on classroom instruction. The district continues to provide training to administrators regarding walk-thrus and evaluations. As the site administration conducts the daily walk-thrus targeting Common Core based lessons, conversations (in email and/or in person) are had regarding what was observed including ways to improve practice, to improve instruction. At monthly Department Chair Meetings time is given to discuss resources needed to help with Common Core instruction. A new copy machine is an example of a purchase that was teacher-driven in order to directly lower costs of the printing of new Common Core lesson plans as well as allow for students to have access to direct text. Recommendation 4. Continue to improve awareness of the needs of special education students in general education classes— As Kimball grew from a student body of just over 900 students to 1600, the need to continue to ensure that staff was up-to-date regarding special education laws, and the needs and the accommodations given to special education students, as well as understanding the differences between 504s and IEPs became apparent. WASC Focus Group #3 put systems into place to ensure that training around special education is provided. In 2014-15 and 2015-16, the Special Education Department including the school psychologist presented an overview of the special education program including JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

17

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

reviewing laws and expectations of schools and staff. In the 2016-17 school year, a break-out session will focus on this topic.

Special Education teachers are involved in all core instructional training. Typically for BuyBack Days and Early Release Monday’s the Special Education teachers are in training for their subject matter with the general education teachers. For example, Kimball’s Special Education English teacher is part of the Design Team for creating the RCD units and has incorporated the RCD units into the special education classroom’s curriculum. This school year, a New Teacher Committee was formed. The principal, an assistant principal, a counselor, the site secretary, three veteran teachers and all nine new teachers are part of the committee. Each person brings a specialty to help the new teachers navigate Kimball. One of the veteran teachers is in the Special Education Department. That veteran teacher’s role is to be the go-to person on campus regarding students who have an IEP or a 504. This person will also help the new teachers to understand the laws of special education and the expectations of the Kimball faculty regarding special education. Yearly, Special Education sends an email to all staff regarding caseloads; and to each specific teacher in the fall of each school year an accommodation list for each student is sent. Principal Rob Pecot stresses the importance and the legal obligation of general education teachers attending IEPs and 504s. The counseling department, including the counseling secretary, work closely with both the general education teachers and the special education teachers to support the special education students in the general education classes. The school psychologist is an integral part of the team; the school psychologist can often be found observing special education students in general education classes providing feedback to the general education teachers as well as the special education team.

Recommendation 5. Continuity in AVID program (e.g. 4-year completion)— AVID has been on Kimball’s campus since the campus opened. In the 2014-15 school year, the long-time AVID coordinator moved to a different site. With new leadership and renewed emphasis on creating a sustainable, worthy program, gains have been made in the AVID program. The current AVID coordinator has been in place since 2014-15. Additionally, there has been a dedicated AVID counselor and a dedicated AVID assistant principal who work in tandem to ensure that AVID gets priority in terms of master schedule, common teacher preps, aligning students’ schedules as well as getting top-notch teachers to teach the AVID elective. The teachers stay with their group of students all four years. The district and county provide training of site team members through-out the school year. Last year, Principal Robert Pecot and the AVID coordinator toured an AVID showcase school. And, the Kimball AVID elective teacher team attends AVID Summer Institute every summer. Both the counselor and administrator who oversee the program have extensive AVID training. The Principal has made AVID a top priority since he took over the position at Kimball. This is evident in the AVID elective class sizes, the teachers teaching the AVID electives, the common prep given to all AVID teachers, as well as charging the AVID team to keep fidelity within the program: students within the program are the students that belong in the program as dictated by AVID Central. As the recruitment for the 2017-18 school year begins, the interest in the AVID JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

18

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

program is the highest it has ever been at Kimball. Recommendation 6. KHS needs to make a definitive choice for the 2016-17 school year whether to continue to offer a pathway program, or move to a different educational model— As a result of the findings of the restructuring committee in the 2014-15 school year, John. C. Kimball High School will operate as a traditional high school with an academy. During the 2015-16 a Design Team (consisting of three teachers, a counselor and an assistant principal) was developed to plan the academy. The team met with site staff, visited other schools, and researched the job needs in the community—all of which laid the foundation for the academy. In August of 2016, the Medical and Health Services Academy (MHSA) opened its doors to 62 freshmen. By the 2019-2020 school year, MHSA will grow to accommodate grades nine through twelve. The Design Team for the Medical and Health Services Academy at John C. Kimball spent the 2015-16 school year planning for the opening of the academy. The planning was extensive: the Design Team met with staff at our site, visited other schools, and researched the job needs in the community, all of which laid the foundation for a Medical Academy at Kimball. This August, the academy opened its doors to nearly seventy freshmen and staff. The curriculum is evolving and purposeful within each academy course—English, Biology, Health Concepts, Algebra and Physical Education. The medical theme is ever-present from academy class to academy class. And, yet, even more important is the idea of team, of belonging. Tracy Unified School District endorses the newest academy to the district. The district allocated money to the academy; with a portion, the team was able to set up the “Medical Wing.” The “wing” is a classroom that looks and feels like a typical medical environment. Additionally, the Design Team reached out to community members to form an Advisory Board which meets quarterly. The board helps support our classroom endeavors like the monthly program “A Day in the Life of…” where people in the local medical community present to our entire academy. Thanks to the Advisory Board, we have connected with Sutter Tracy Hospital and the Tracy Hospital Foundation. Both have donated, as well as provided grant opportunities. In addition, John C. Kimball High School has transitioned to operate as a traditional high school without pathways. Incoming students are no longer designated to a pathway of their choice. With the exception to MHSA teachers, the master schedule does not have teachers designated to pathways. Kimball High School will continue to offer pathway cord opportunities to students in grades 10-12 through the 2018-2019 school year. The previous organization of the John C. Kimball High School’s Pathways facilitated interdisciplinary learning opportunities. The new organization of the school has made interdisciplinary learning opportunities challenging. To that end, the MHSA is determined to provide students meaningful interdisciplinary learning opportunities around the medical theme. Through the re-structuring process—as well as WASC—the site identified the need for a new system to support new teachers; a New Teacher Committee has been formed. Organization of the counselors and administrations transitioned to servicing students by alphabetical order (except for AVID and the academy who have a dedicated counselor). As work begins to schedule students for next year, the interest to attend Kimball and be part of the Medical Health Services Academy and AVID is growing. The academy anticipates the seventy freshman slots will be full in 2017-18. And, as mentioned in recommendation 5 above, the interest in the JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

19

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL – PROGRESS REPORT

2016-2017

AVID program is the highest it has ever been at Kimball. Also, four new course proposals were written by Kimball faculty this fall, and all were approved by the district for 2017-18: Health Concepts II (an academy class), Advance Game Design, Advance Piano, and Marching Band. IV: Progress on Critical Areas for Follow-up/School wide Action Plan Embedded in our Action Plan for each goal is a rationale with growth targets. GOAL #1 John C. Kimball High School operates as a traditional high school and will expand, promote, and strengthen the Medical and Health Services Academy through interdisciplinary instructional strategies and activities. GOAL #2 John C. Kimball High School’s heterogeneous and homogeneous staff teams work on the analysis of disaggregated data to drive student achievement. John C. Kimball High School’s staff analyzes data to ensure that students’ A-G requirement completion rate will improve with appropriate instructional support for enrolled students. John C. Kimball High School assesses student achievement of the SLOs. GOAL #3 John C. Kimball High School promotes and strengthens school-wide programs including EL, AVID, AP, Special Education, CTE, extra-curricular and co-curricular programs. GOAL #4 John C. Kimball High School communicates and implements strategies with all stakeholders to increase students’ success. John C. Kimball High School communicates and implements strategies with all stakeholders to ensure school safety. GOAL #5 John C. Kimball High School implements and strengthens curriculum that meets Common Core Standards and Next Generation Science Standards. John C. Kimball High School continues to provide professional development opportunities. V: School-wide Action Plan Refinements During the 2014-15 school year, Kimball High School staff worked to create an updated schoolwide action plan. The staff understood that the previous action plan was insufficient and inaccurate. An action plan was developed. Currently, from the Mid-Cycle Visit in October of 2015, the following Action Plan is the revised plan that incorporates the recommendations of the visiting WASC Committee.

JOHN C. KIMBALL HIGH SCHOOL

20

Comments