Molly Evolution

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This question allows students to find scientific evidence for evolution over the ..... pictures of skulls, migration data worksheet (from PBS evolution resources).
EVOLUTION!

EALR’s & GLE’s • 1.3.9(10) Analyze the scientific evidence used to develop the theory of biological evolution and the concepts of natural selection, speciation, adaptation and biological diversity. • 2.1.3(9,10) Apply understanding of how to construct and revise a scientific explanation using evidence and inferential logic. • 2.2.2(9,10) Analyze scientific theories for logic, consistency, historical and current evidence, limitations, and for capacity to be investigated and modified. • Need to know what inquiry will be before I know EALR 3.

Atlas of Scientific Literacy • Biological Evolution (BE) • Evolution of Life: Natural Selection (NS)

Rationale: Evolution is one of the main unifying principles of all of biology. It is a process that applies to all life on earth and involves every level of biological organization --from molecular to cellular to organismal to population, to the global community. Evolution is backed by numerous branches of science and is a good introduction to the use of scientific evidence to substantiate a theory—a basic skill of scientific literacy. If the mechanisms of evolution are understood, it provides a lens for students to examine its products and processes (including all things human!) in a larger context.



Critical Attributes: • Evolution is the theory that all living things have changed in response to environmental conditions by the natural selection of randomly occurring mutations. • Natural variability in populations affords certain individuals advantages and allows them to out compete for resources and survive to reproduce and pass on their genetic information. • Over expansive periods of time, life has developed from the simpler forms to more complex forms which are more prolific and stronger, due to their better adaptation to their environment. • When a population changes and adapts to a specific ecological niche, enough so they are unable to reproduce with the parent population, a new species is formed. • Evolution can be observed in and supported by evidence in the fields of Genetics, Biogeography, Embryology, Paleontology and Morphology. • Evolution is a controversial topic and can be in opposition to some religious beliefs. Evolution and Creationism conflict on the origin and development of the diversity of life on earth. • Evolution points to a common ancestry among all living things, thus explaining the unity and diversity of life.

Essential Questions: 1.

[pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic] Why are there so many kinds of “noses”?

This question can have students start to look at the similarities and differences between vertebrate animals. I can also have students start to ask not just what are the differences and similarities, but WHY are there similarities and differences. The question begins to illustrate the diversity and unity of life on earth and serves as a entry point into how evolution has shaped these things.

2. How do we know this evolution stuff is true?

This question allows students to find scientific evidence for evolution over the history of life on earth. With the background of understanding the mechanisms of evolution, kids can think more critically about how science has gathered and interpreted evidence for it.

Culminating Project: The culminating project will involve a trip to the Woodland Park Zoo. During the visit, the students will view some of the diversity of animal life on earth, and groups will choose one species to look at closely through an evolutionary perspective. The project will be a creative endeavor that will address the following:

• Where does the animal live? (In the world and habitat) • How has this animal adapt to its natural environment (appearance, feeding strategies, predation etc.)? • What are some of its close living relatives? How does it differ from them? • What are some of its extinct relatives? How it is different from its ancestors? • Some other awesome questions I’ll come up with along the way…

This project is meant to be creative and informative. The students will be able to choose the format for how they wish to convey the information about their animal. All groups will do a presentation of this product for the class. The class will create a phylogenic tree of their chosen organisms on the classroom wall to see how they are related evolutionarily.

Goals and Objectives:

1. Students will analyze the scientific evidence used to develop the theory of biological evolution and the concepts of natural selection, speciation, adaptation and biological diversity. (EALR 1.3.9 (10)) 1. Students will analyze homologous structures among vertebrates for similarities and differences. 2. Students will be able to explain how form and function are related. 3. Students will understand how the natural selection of randomly occurring mutations causes change in population over time. 4. Students will use a predation model to support the idea of Natural Selection. 5. Students will model speciation and common ancestry by adapting the same materials to different circumstances repeatedly. 6. Students will understand that an ecological niche is the sum of all an organism does to survive in its habitat. 7. Students will analyze the concept of geological/evolutionary time by looking at the ratios of length of time between certain key events in the earth’s history. 8. Students will understand how the fossil record can provide evidence for evolution by examining a series of whale progenitors. 9. Students will identify similarities between vertebrate embryos at different stages of development substantiate the idea of common ancestry. 10. Students will use actual data from fossil evidence to determine patterns and develop and examine hypothesis that explain the data. 11. Students will understand that the theory of evolution is a scientific idea backed by evidence, whereas creationism is a religious theory based on faith, and since the two are rooted on different premises, they need not be in conflict.

2. Students will apply understanding of how to construct and revise a scientific explanation using evidence and inferential logic. (EALR 2.1.3 (10)) 1. Students will apply evidence from one circumstance to another using inference. 2. Students will use data as evidence to construct scientific explanations. 3. Students will compile multiple ideas to form a scientific argument. 3. Evaluate consequences, constraints, and applications of solutions to a problem or challenge (EALR 3.1.3(10)) 1. Students will identify assumptions in a scientific investigation or argument. 2. Students will evaluate scientific explanations for limitations. 3. Students will develop questions about scientific ideas based on their current understanding. 4. Students will develop skills and attitudes needed to needed to work effectively with all people. 1. Students will learn to respect ideas different than their own. 2. Students will work effectively in groups.

Unit Matrix

|Day 1: Noses and Homologous Structures | |Kids Do This!|Students will view slide show of nose after nose after | | |nose and start to consider the question “Why are there | | |so many kinds of noses?” Students will have copies of | | |the pictures and brainstorm in groups about the | | |essential question with the following questions as | | |guides: | | |Do they all serve the same purpose? | | |What do they all have in common? | | |Why might they be so different? | | |Which ones look the most similar? Is any thing else | | |about the animals similar? | | |Students will then consider in their groups if there | | |are any other structures that are similar between | | |animals and come up with a few examples to share with | | |the class (like scatergories, if someone else used one,| | |no other groups can), this will hopefully help us come | | |up with a good list which can be used to introduce the | | |idea of homologous structures. I will provide visuals | | |for some examples (i.e. Whale fin, bat wing, human | | |hand, frog leg) | |Objectives | Students will analyze homologous structures among | | |vertebrates for similarities and differences. | | |4.2 Students will work effectively in groups. | |Why Do This? |By starting with the slide show I hope to get students | | |engaged by having them check out some of the crazy | | |things mother nature has come up with by looking at a | | |familiar thing (noses). They then can use their | | |previous knowledge to answer some preliminary questions| | |of why this might be. After considering noses, the | | |students can then extend what they came up with for | | |noses as a way to think about structure function and | | |homology in general This will serve as a jumping off | | |point into the whole unit. | |Evidence of |Students will brainstorm on butcher paper which will be| |Understanding|hung on the wall. I will monitor group discussions. | | |During homology scatergories I will be able to see how | | |students relate their ideas about noses to other | | |structures and functions of animals. | |Cultural |By providing visuals, using group work and a game | |Responsivenes|format for class discussion, the lesson provides access| |s |to many types of learners and builds an inclusive | | |community. By giving them the power of coming up with | | |scientific ideas and examples, it empowers the students| | |to take ownership of science. | |What You’ll |Power Point slide show of tons of crazy animal noses | |Need |and homology examples | | |Paper copies of the slides for group work | | |Butcher paper and markers | |Day 2: Structure and function | |Kids Do This!|Students will take what they had been thinking about | | |(homologous structures and what they do) and start to | | |think more critically about what these structures are | | |for. They will do an activity that involves using | | |tools to perform different tasks and record their | | |effectiveness in their journals. This serves to | | |illustrate how structure often dictates function. | | |Using wrong tool for the wrong task (hammer to cut | | |paper for example) or the perfect tool for a task can | | |show, biologically, why animals look and act like they | | |do. Kids will then think of examples of how this works| | |in animals (long legs on wading birds, fins for | | |swimming, sharp teeth for meat eaters, nostrils on top | | |of whale heads for breathing at surface etc). Students| | |will then use almost the right tool for a job (like a | | |phillips screwdriver for a flathead screw) to show how | | |small differences in structure can change the | | |effectiveness of function. Wow, isn’t that a great | | |segue to Natural Selection? | |Objectives |Students will be able to explain how form and function | | |are related. | | |Students will apply evidence from one circumstance to | | |another using inference. | | |Students will work effectively in groups. | |Why Do This? |This activity will take the structures the students | | |have started to work on and bring their function into | | |their thinking. The activity will take common things | | |(tools) that students understand the function of and | | |show how their function IS their structure. It will | | |guide them to fuse the two concepts and show them that | | |the two are inextricably linked. Once this foundation | | |is laid, they can start to see how small differences in| | |structure can alter function and lead them into a way | | |to start to think about mutation and natural selection.| |Evidence of |Students will take qualitative data and make inferences| |Understanding|about how structure and function work in animals in | | |their journals. This can help me see how they are able| | |to generalize concepts from one context to another. | |Cultural |By using familiar objects to illustrate a scientific | |Responsivenes|concept, access is provided to all students. The | |s |physical nature of the activity can engage many types | | |of learners. Continuing with group work in a | | |non-competitive atmosphere will build relationships | | |among class mates and help to form a positive learning | | |environment. | |What You’ll |Some tools (screwdriver, hammer, scissors, socket | |Need |wrench, vise-grips etc.) | | |Corresponding stuff for the tools to work on (nails, | | |screws, paper, etc) | |Day 3: Natty Selection—how it works… | |Kids Do This!|Students will do an activity about the English Pepper | | |Moth and how the population changed from mostly light | | |colored to dark colored after the industrial | | |revolution. What was successful camouflage for the | | |moth against tree bark changed as the trees got | | |blackened with soot. It involves kids collecting data | | |on “bird predation” of different colored paper moths on| | |different backgrounds over a few “generations”. The | | |data will then be graphed and analyzed. Groups will | | |report their findings to the class and we will have a | | |class discussion about what happened and why and | | |students will make a rule about what they saw happen. | | |They will then, as a class, share their models and the | | |class will come to a consensus on a class model. They | | |will then come up with other things that might make an | | |animal susceptible to predation (speed, stealth, pioson| | |etc.) and other examples of factors that could cause | | |individuals in a population to not survive/reproduce | | |(feeding, temp, disease susceptibility, etc.) using the| | |model they created. | |Objectives | Students will understand how the natural selection of| | |randomly occurring mutations causes change in | | |population over time. | | |Students will use a predation model to support the idea| | |of Natural Selection. | | |2.2 Students will use data as evidence to construct | | |scientific explanations. | | |3.1 Students will identify assumptions in a scientific | | |investigation or argument. | | |3.2 Students will evaluate scientific explanations | | |for limitations. | | |4.2 Students will work effectively in groups. | |Why Do This? |This activity will illustrate how a particular | | |structure (color of moth) and its function (camouflage | | |against bird predators) can change the make up of a | | |population over time. It will show “survival of the | | |fittest” in context of a specific (and REAL) case and | | |allow kids to collect experimental data (albeit a bit | | |contrived) to “see” natural selection. I will not | | |introduce the term “natural selection” and students | | |will be responsible for making their own “rule”, and | | |thus be exposed to MODELS!!! Students can then apply | | |their findings to a broader context and think of other | | |examples of Natural Selection in action. | |Evidence of |Students will collect and analyze data in their | |Understanding|journals and come up with their own rule for natural | | |selection. Class discussion will allow me to see where| | |students are in terms of applying the model of natural | | |selection in other cases. | |Cultural |This activity is active, intellectually challenging and| |Responsivenes|involves both small and large group portions, | |s |providing high expectations and access to different | | |types of learners. Students will be responsible for | | |making their own scientific models, thus challenging | | |the culture of science and empowering students to take | | |ownership of scientific ideas. | |What You’ll |Each group needs: | |Need |2 “Bark” sheets (mottled, black) | | |2 sets of “moths” (mottled and black) | | |Procedure hand outs | | |Graph Paper | |Days 4 and 5: Ecological Niches and Speciation and Common Ancestry | |What Kids Do!|Groups will come in and be issued identical sets of | | |random items (paper clips, tongue depressors, tape, | | |thread, whatever…) Each group will then be assigned a | | |different set of tasks (things like getting paper dots | | |out of the bottom of a soda bottle with out turning it | | |over and floating in a bowl of water). The groups | | |will use any combination of their items to complete the| | |tasks and put aside any unused items after their tasks | | |are complete. Groups will catalogue the items they | | |used (each group should be different) and report out | | |what tasks they completed and which items were used to | | |complete them. Groups will then be asked to come up | | |with an explanation of why their crazy teacher has made| | |them do this weird activity. They will be reminded to | | |think about biology, evolution, structure, function and| | |natural selection when creating their hypothesis. | | |HOPEFULLY, kids will come up with the idea that the | | |tasks are like what an organism does to survive in its | | |environment, and the items are how it does it. This | | |will be a way to talk about ecological niches (for an | | |animal in the wild, what are the “tasks”? Getting food,| | |water, shelter, staying safe. What are the items? The | | |strategies a species uses to get those things they | | |need.) | | |The students will then make and name a species out of | | |the items they used and write a story about its niche, | | |describing how it adapted (the tasks it had to perform)| | |to survive in its “habitat”. Each class will end up | | |with a number of species and we will display these in | | |the class room in a “zoo”. Using their knowledge base | | |from the rest of the unit we will relate this to real | | |organisms in class discussion and talk about speciation| | |and common ancestry (they all started with the same | | |stuff, but because they had different niches, the | | |products were very different) | |Objectives | Students will model speciation and common ancestry by| | |adapting the same materials to different circumstances | | |repeatedly. | | |Students will understand that an ecological niche is | | |the sum of all an organism does to survive in its | | |habitat. | | |Students will apply evidence from one circumstance to | | |another using inference. | | |Students will work effectively in groups. | |Why Do This? |This activity will serve as a fun and memorable way to | | |get students thinking about how organisms adapt to | | |their environment. | |Evidence of |Students will present hypothesis of now activity | |Understanding|relates to evolution and display their final “animal” | | |and story. Class and group discussions will be | | |monitored and guided closely so the activity is | | |meaningful and scientific ideas (ecological niches and | | |speciation) are paramount (make it content RICH, not | | |content lean). | |Cultural |This activity gives students multiple ways to think | |Responsivenes|about the topic at hand, giving opportunities to many | |s |different kinds of learners to show their stuff. By | | |making the lesson funny, strange and creative, it | | |challenges the culture of science, and allows the | | |students to make their own connections and have fun! | |Resources |Lots of random items and list of tasks that could | | |involve said items | |Day 6: A Nose By Any Other Name… | |What Kids Do!|Students will be responsible for answering the nose | | |essential question. The same pictures from the first | | |class will be brought out and students will choose 4 | | |examples and make an argument for why their nose is the| | |way it is in their journals. Students can use web | | |resources if they need additional information. They | | |will also answer the essential question in their own | | |words. | |Objectives |2.3 Students will compile multiple ideas to form a | | |scientific argument. | |Why Do This? |This is a way for students to compile the concepts | | |covered in the unit so far and demonstrate their | | |understanding of the concepts in context of how the | | |unit was started, bringing them full circle. The | | |students will be assured that there isn’t a “right” | | |answer, just which they need to think of the principles| | |and ideas discussed in class when reasoning through | | |their answers. | |Evidence of |Students will develop rationale for the structure, | |Understanding|function and reasons for different “noses”. They will | | |apply principles and construct arguments for their | | |claims. | |Cultural |This assignment leaves room for multiple | |Responsivenes|interpretations, recognizing different approaches to | |s |the same problem. | |Resources |Pictures of noses from lesson 1 | |Day 7: How do we know this evolution stuff is true? (New essential| |question!) | |What Kids Do!|Kids will start to consider this new essential question| | |and will explore what scientist mean by evidence. | | |Groups will brainstorm evidence of their own existence | | |(How would and alien know YOU existed? What is the | | |evidence? Your stuff, your schoolwork, your trash, | | |emails, etc.) A class discussion will then address | | |questions: | | |What could someone tell about your day from the | | |evidence you left? | | |What couldn’t they tell? | | |What kind of evidence might exist for evolution? | | |Students will read National Geographic article “Was | | |Darwin Wrong?” (Nov 2004). The article contains some | | |background on Charles Darwin, multiple lines of | | |Evidence and cool pictures. Students will take notes | | |and come up with questions they have about the article.| | |We will make a list of them on the board and try to | | |address them in the course of the rest of the unit. | |Objectives |2.3 Students will compile multiple ideas to form a | | |scientific argument. | | |2.1 Students will apply evidence from one circumstance| | |to another using inference. | | |3.3 Students will develop questions about scientific | | |ideas based on their current understanding. | |Why Do This? |This will give students an entry point to talk about | | |evidence for evolution. By connecting the evidence of | | |their existence to the evidence for evolutions | | |existence, they will have a better understanding of | | |what kinds of things are considered evidence. They | | |have learned about the mechanisms and products of | | |evolution they HOW and WHAT, but not the tons of stuff | | |to back it up. The article is has great background for| | |the rest of the unit and cool pictures to make the | | |concepts more real. Questions the students have can be| | |addressed throughout the rest of the unit. | |Evidence of |Students will apply the idea of evidence of their own | |Understanding|lives to the case for evolution. Students will | | |identify problems, questions and assumptions made by | | |the author of the article. Class and group discussions | | |will be monitored for understanding. Students will | | |write notes and questions about the article in their | | |journal. | |Cultural |BY connecting the ideas to the lives of the students, | |Responsivenes|the lesson acknowledges different backgrounds and it | |s |breaks down prejudices by showing that we all leave | | |behind similar kinds of evidence of our existence. The| | |article is a little text heavy in parts, but the most | | |impactful and important bits are large pictures with | | |small amounts of accompanying text full of BIG IDEAS! | | |This will allow students with reading difficulties to | | |get the important info from the article. | |Resources |Butcher paper, markers, copies of the article. | |Day 8: DEEP TIME | |What Kids Do!|Using provided resources groups of kids will create | | |timelines of the earth’s history using long cash | | |register tape. Kids will use time landmarks such as: | | |oceans form, O2 in the atmosphere, first life, first | | |vertebrates, first mammals, first humans etc. The | | |length of the tape will provide a visual for the kids | | |to conceptualize geologic and evolutionary time. | | |Additionally, using the length of the period as the | | |history of the earth, I will announce periodically | | |throughout the class the same events the kids are using| | |to create their timeline. | |Objectives | Students will analyze the concept of | | |geological/evolutionary time by looking at the ratios | | |of length of time between certain key events in the | | |earth’s history. | | |4.2 Students will work effectively in groups. | |Why Do This? |Geologic time is a difficult concept for kids to grasp,| | |as 15 years is literally a lifetime. This activity | | |gives students multiple ways to conceptualize deep time| | |especially from an evolutionary perspective. This will| | |lay a foundation for understanding the fossil record, | | |common ancestry, biogeography and many of the evidences| | |for evolution, as they all relate to VERY long periods | | |of time. | |Evidence of |Students will analyze geologic time by interpreting a | |Understanding|list of dates into a physical representation. Students| | |will post their timelines on classroom wall. | |Cultural |Multiple means of demonstrating the concept will allow | |Responsivenes|access to a larger amount of students. Group work will| |s |continue to foster a positive and inclusive community. | |Resources |Rolls of cash register tape, colored pencils, resources| | |for events to be included in the time line, a timer. | |Day 9 and 10: Fossil Record, your laundry basket and whales… | |What Kids Do!|Students will use their knowledge of geologic time to | | |learn about the fossil record. They will relate the | | |layers of fossils to their laundry baskets (what you | | |wore the longest ago is probably on the bottom). The | | |activity will consist of students doing web research on| | |a number of species of whale progenitors (hand out with| | |pictures provided from PBS evolution lessons). | | |Students will collect data such as: year reported, | | |country found in, habitat, skull/teeth (more like land | | |mammal or whale?), limbs and tail (how did it get | | |around?) Students will then place “fossils” on a time | | |line in the order discovered, filling in “missing | | |links” as paleontologists discovered the fossils. | | |Students will discuss what kind of fossils might exist | | |in some of the larger gaps. What layer of sediment | | |might they look for such fossils? What kind of | | |characteristics might they have? (I will try to have | | |real examples of fossils (not whale!) for students to | | |touch and feel and see with their own eyes) | |Objectives | Students will understand how the fossil record can | | |provide evidence for evolution by examining a series of| | |whale progenitors. | | |2.2 Students will use data as evidence to construct | | |scientific explanations. | | |Students will work effectively in groups. | |Why Do This? |Using a specific example of a line of fossil evidence, | | |students will be able to see how whales and their | | |ancestors changed over time. Students will use | | |research skills to find information, and use that | | |information to prove to themselves how the fossil | | |record shows evidence for evolution. | |Evidence of |Students will explain their thinking and provide | |Understanding|evidence for their timeline with data. Students will | | |turn in whale data sheets and post their fossil | | |timeline. Whole class and group discussion will be | | |monitored for understanding. | |Cultural |This assignment gives the poser of scientific | |Responsivenes|explanation to the students, challenging the idea that | |s |science only comes from “textbooks and authorities”. | | |The availability of many roles within group work allows| | |for differences and demonstration of strengths. | |Resources |Copies of ‘Whales in the Making” and “Whale data sheet”| | |handouts. As many fossils as I can get my hands on… | |Day 11: Embryology | |What Kids Do!|Students will do an activity that involves using cut up| | |pictures of embryological stages of multiple organisms | | |(chicken, frog, fish, human, dog, monkey etc.) and are | | |set about the task of organizing them by organism and | | |age. This will demonstrate the relative similarity of | | |the embryological development of vertebrates. The | | |students will discuss how this relates to evolution: | | |Why might the embryos be so similar? Are some more | | |similar than others? How closely related are they? | | |How well does this evidence alone explain evolution? | |Objectives | Students will identify similarities between | | |vertebrate embryos at different stages of development | | |substantiate the idea of common ancestry. | | |Students will evaluate scientific explanations for | | |limitations. | | |4.2 Student will work effectively in groups. | |Why Do This? |By having the students wrestle with a wad of pictures | | |that all look alike, the students will not only utilize| | |problem solving abilities, but it will force them to | | |look closely at the pictures and really see what the | | |similarities and differences are. They will be able to| | |use their knowledge of homology and apply it on a whole| | |organism level. | |Evidence of |Students will interpret the developmental stages of | |Understanding|vertebrates and identify patterns. They will turn in | | |their final chart of the embryos with reasoning and | | |group discussion will be monitored for understanding. | |Cultural |Multiple means of demonstrating the concept will allow | |Responsivenes|access to a larger amount of students. Group work will| |s |continue to foster a positive and inclusive community. | |Resources |Sets of embryo pictures (1/group), tape. | |Days 12, 13 and 14: Fossils and Migration Patterns of Early | |Hominids: Putting it together… | |What Kids Do!|Quesiton: Where did human life originate and how did | | |it dispurse around the world? First, kids will explore| | |the PBS web resource, “The Riddle of the Bones” to get | | |some background on ancient hominids. Groups of kids | | |will choose a species of early Hominid and given data | | |on where their fossils have been found and how old they| | |are. Student will plot this information of small world| | |maps, and then all groups will plot their specimens | | |with different colored push pins on a master class map.| | |Students will develop a model for the distribution and | | |hypothesize about the evolutionary and migrational | | |patterns of early hominids and identify assumptions and| | |limitations of their model through group word and class| | |discussion. | |Objectives |Students will use actual data from fossil evidence to | | |determine patterns and develop and examine hypothesis | | |that explain the data. | | |3.1 Students will identify assumptions in a | | |scientific investigation or argument. | | |3.2 Students will evaluate scientific explanations | | |for limitations. | | |Multiple means of demonstrating the concept will allow | | |access to a larger amount of students. | | |4.2 Group work will continue to foster a positive and | | |inclusive community. | |Why Do This? |This is a way to put together the unit in context of | | |humans (and their ancestors), to bring home the concept| | |that evolution isn’t just something that | | |happens/happened to other organisms, but to us as well.| | |Students will use inquiry skills and real data to | | |develop a model of how these species disbursed and | | |evolved on a global scale. Using maps will put the | | |data in context of the world we live in and will | | |develop map reading skills (so fun!). | |Evidence of |Students will create a map of the distribution of | |Understanding|different hominid species. Students will also do a | | |worksheet and provide evidence for how and why this | | |distribution happened. A culminating class discussion | | |will show how deep student understanding is. | |Cultural |By looking at human evolution in a global context | |Responsivenes|students will be able to see themselves and their | |s |ancestry in the history of hominid existence. Using | | |human evidence may draw a more personal connection to | | |the material. By having students come up with their | | |own explanation for the data, the culture of science is| | |challenged and students are empowered to take ownership| | |of science. | |Resources |Computers to view web activity “Riddle of the Bones” | | |Copies of small world map, pictures of skulls, | | |migration data worksheet (from PBS evolution resources)| | |Large world map | | |Color coded push pins. | | |Reproduction skulls if available | |Days 15 and 16 (or earlier if necessary: Evolution and creationism | |are they mutually exclusive? | |What Kids Do |Students will watch one or all the following PBS video | | |on creationism and evolution in history, religion and | | |society: Why is Evolution Controversial Anyway?, Isn’t | | |Evolution Just a Theory? and What about God? (my | | |computer is too slow to watch them so I can’t choose | | |which one, but I will!) We will hold a class | | |discussion (starting in small groups, then large group)| | |about the video and any concerns or issues that arise. | |Objectives | Students will understand that the theory of | | |evolution is a scientific idea backed by evidence, | | |whereas creationism is a religious theory based on | | |faith, and since the two are rooted on different | | |premises, they need not be in conflict. | | |Students will learn to respect ideas different than | | |their own. | |Why Do This? |This will be an opportunity to acknowledge evolution in| | |a societal and religious perspective, not just a | | |scientific. Evolution is the most controversial | | |scientific topic of our time so it is important that | | |students are both well informed, and scientifically and| | |socially literate about it. It is important for | | |students to understand that not everyone agrees on | | |evolution, but you can understand the science and | | |evidence supporting the theory of evolution, regardless| | |of personal beliefs. | |Evidence for |Through discussion students will acknowledge multiple | |Understanding|perspectives and ask insightful questions about the | | |nature of science and religion (huge I know but I’ll | | |try to keep it manageable…) | |Cultural |This lesson acknowledges the worlds and cultures of all| |Responsivenes|students by allowing them to see evolution from through| |s |the eyes of many belief systems. It supports an equity| | |pedagogy by acknowledging beliefs and culture and not | | |making judgements on these things. | |Resources |PBS Videos or High Speed Internet access. | |Day ??? (sometime in the unit): ZOO MANIA!!! | |What Kids Do!|Class will take a field trip to the zoo. Students will| | |have an assignment to complete during their visit. | | |They will be required to spend 5 minutes observing at | | |least one reptile, bird, amphibian, primate, one other | | |mammal and one animal of their choosing. These animals| | |should represent a variety of native habitats (some | | |from desert, rainforest, temperate forest etc.) In | | |their journals they will record, the species, their | | |country(ies) of origin, animal behavior during their | | |observation and any obvious adaptations they possess. | | |They will also be aware of their culminating project | | |and should be thinking about that as they check out the| | |zoo. | |Objectives |Students will apply evidence from one circumstance to | | |another using inference. | | |***HAVE FUN AND CHECK OUT COOL ANIMALS!!! | |Why Do This? |This is a way for kids to see first hand some of the | | |amazing products of evolution. They will have a new | | |perspective (after the unit) to view the animals with. | | |The assignment assures that the students see a variety | | |of animals. Also a good excuse to get out of the | | |classroom. | |Evidence for |Students will use observational and inferential skills | |Understanding|to complete animal observations in journals. | |Cultural |Students will be taken out of the traditional classroom| |Responsivenes|environment and given the opportunity experience some | |s |of their content first hand. I will try to secure free| | |tickets or at least financial assistance for the field | | |trip to provide equal access to all students. | |Recources |Zoo tickets, transportation. | |Day 17 and 18: Zoo Presentations | |What Kids Do!|Students will do and watch their zoo animal project | | |presentations. Students will be responsible for | | |assessing their classmate’s presentations with teacher | | |provided rubric. When all presentations are done, | | |students will create a phylogenic tree on the wall of | | |their animals and their relationship to one another. | | |Students will engage in a discussion about what all of | | |the animals they chose have in common? What do they | | |have in common with other kinds of life (plants, | | |invertebrates, bacteria etc). This will be segue to | | |the next unit: Unity and Diversity of Life: Common | | |Traits and Classification! | |Objectives |2.2 Students will use data as evidence to construct | | |scientific explanations. | | |3.2 Students will evaluate scientific explanations | | |for limitations. | | |4.1 Students will learn to respect ideas different | | |than their own. | |Why Do This? |This will provide students the opportunity to have an | | |audience for their projects, providing both incentive | | |to do well and authenticity. Students will be exposed | | |to a wealth of information and see how others tackled | | |the same project they did. It will bring the unit to a| | |head and provide a springboard to begin the next unit. | |Cultural |The project allows for a bazillion different | |Responsivenes|interpretations and by showing them off for each other,| |s |it provides a way to celebrate one another’s | | |differences. | |Resources |STUDENT PROJECTS!!!! |

Notes: First of all, I’ll bet this takes longer than 18 days, some of the lessons will take longer, but I don’t know which ones, as I have not taught them yet! But hey, I’m new at this right? Also, evolution is a hard topic to do a full inquiry with (evolution takes a long time) but in the unit there are a few lessons that are definitely inquiry—Pepper Moth, whale fossils and especially hominid migration. The phases of inquiry are all represented throughout the unit.

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