MSU Alumni Magazine, Fall 2004 issue - MSU Alumni Association

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PAGE 1. Michigan State University • Fall 2004 • Volume 22, No.1 .... Dr. Robert J. Pressley, '54. San Francisco, CA ... vice president Roger Wilkinson, Trustee David Porteous ... prised at the beauty of the campus and the number and character of ... teams from such schools as Duke,. UCLA ... Glothian-Taylor of MSU Police.
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Michigan State University • Fall 2004 • Volume 22, No.1

Cover: Peter McPherson Photo by Kurt Stepnitz, University Relations

THE MCPHERSON YEARS: 1993-2004 In a Hannahesque manner, Peter McPherson pushed productivity to a new level and advanced MSU’s vision for the future. 20 A SPARTAN CONQUERS MT. EVEREST An alum seeking to climb the Seven Summits recounts his recent successful conquest of Mt. Everest. 28 MSU PLAYS KEY ROLE IN HOMELAND SECURITY MSU is playing a key role in homeland security, such as helping protect the integrity of our food supply. 34

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Editor, MSU Alumni Magazine 108 Union Bldg. East Lansing, MI 48824-1029 Include name, address, phone, email and MSU degree/year (if applicable). Letters may be edited. Via fax: (517) 432-7769 Via email: [email protected] Via web: http://www.msualum.com/ magazine/formltr.cfm

Departments President’s Perspective 2 In-Basket 3 Around Circle Drive 4 Spartan Profiles 16 Sports 44 Alma Matters 50 State’s Stars 60 Obituaries 62 Lasting Impressions 64

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PRESIDENT’SPERSPECTIVE

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MSU Alumni Magazine Robert Bao Editor Geneva Tupper Advertising Manager Dave Giordan Design Tim Potter Photography

MSU Alumni Association Keith A. Williams Executive Director Nancy Brent Associate Director David Brown Assistant Director Louise Cooley Assistant Director Andy Henderson Assistant Director Sharon Radtke Assistant Director L. Patrick Scheetz Assistant Director Sandy Soifer Assistant Director Bev VandenBerg Assistant Director Beverly Carnahan Executive Staff Assistant Regina Cross Marketing and Sales Coordinator Cheryl Denison Marketing and Sales Coordinator Tim Potter Information Officer Dominic Schimizzi Business Manager Jackie Sweet Membership Coordinator

Advertising Manager, Geneva Tupper (517) 432-1951 • fax (517) 432-7769

n my final President’s Perspective, I want to thank all of you for your support, counsel, and advocacy for our wonderful university. These past 11 years have reinforced an already held belief that Michigan State is not only a great university, but a caring and responsive one. Indeed, we “advance knowledge and transform lives” throughout the world in truly remarkable ways—we always have, and we always will. I leave the presidency as Spartans worldwide celebrate our sesquicentennial. With each event, with each ceremony, with each retrospective, one reason we remain the nation’s pioneer and pioneering land-grant university becomes obvious: We follow in the footsteps of legends. From great scientists to great teachers, from great faculty to great students, from those who created new knowledge to those who globally applied that knowledge, from visionaries to pragmatists, we have been led, in action and in example, by the best. Earlier this fall, the MSU family came together to celebrate and honor our heritage. On September 17 we dedicated the statue of John Hannah, whose presidency from 1941 to 1969 is regarded as historic not only on the banks of the Red Cedar, but throughout all of higher education. On the eve of World War II, John Hannah became president of a college already considered a successful “grand experiment.” But he transformed that well-regarded regional college into a renowned global university, successfully conducting many “grand experiments” of his own—from naming higher education’s first dean of international programs to building the largest campus residence hall system, from bringing the National Superconducting Cyclotron to campus to personally recruiting highly sought-after young faculty who became internationally renowned scholars at John Hannah’s MSC and MSU. As I said on that Friday morning, “John Hannah saw the future. And he led us there.” The statue of John Hannah captures his spirit, and it captures the spirit of MSU. As depicted in the statue, John Hannah is not standing still—he’s on the move. Just like his beloved university. Hannah’s on-the-move statue calls us to follow him. His vision, his values, his example, and his leadership are part of our present and our future, just as they are part of our past. As I said on the dedication day, “May his vision and values guide us for generations to come.” As Joanne and I prepare to leave a place, a time, and people that truly have transformed our lives, we know that MSU’s first 150 years are a prelude to even greater accomplishments. And we are very grateful for a university that values its heritage and traditions. What—and who—made MSU great, will keep MSU great. As John Hannah so often said, “Only people are important.”

COPYRIGHT 2004 MSU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MSU Alumni Association MSU Union East Lansing, MI 48824-1029 (517) 355-8314

Peter McPherson President, Michigan State University

MSU is an affirmative-action, equal opportunity institution.

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INBASKET PRESIDENT DESIGNATE In the nearly 30 years I’ve known Dr. Simon (cover story, Summer 2004), she has greatly impressed me with her diligence, integrity, and how fast she masters the intricacies of disparate issues facing MSU and its faculty. Her scholarly research on faculty productivity and other institutional matters, her vast administrative experience, and the human capital she has acquired over the years uniquely qualify her to lead this University. As faculty liaison to the MSU Board of Trustees and someone active in our academic governance system, I have had many opportunities to interact with Dr. Simon and to appreciate her experience, knowledge, confidence, passion, and vision for MSU. In choosing a new leader, our Board of Trustees also faced a time-critical constraint with the host of threats and opportunities confronting us right now. Dr. Simon’s keen insight into many issues, from the proposed expansion of the College of Human Medicine in Grand Rapids to the revision of the liberal arts curriculum, clearly made her the unequivocal frontrunner. I’m pleased the Board decided not to conduct a national search for a president when we already have a nationally recognized candidate who would soon be offered the opportunity to lead another major university if she didn’t have the job at MSU. At no time in the past has a thorough understanding of the University been more important to MSU than it is right now, given our many ongoing projects including the Capital Campaign and the effort to land the billion-dollar Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) project. We need a leader who fully un-

the Varsity “S” Alumni Club, 5. usher at football games for $1.00, then take your girlfriend to Coral Gables, 6. work in a dorm cafeteria to help pay for tuition, 7. hitch hike to Detroit to see the Tigers or Red Wings. Bill Roberts, ’43 San Clemente, CA ☛ Bill founded MSU’s Orange County Alumni Club and served as president of MSU’s Southern California Alumni Club. –Editor. derstands these and other issues facing MSU. We have this leader in Dr. Simon. E. James Potchen, M.D. Univ. Distinguished Professor WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A SPARTAN Number 4 was “Get a parking ticket.” I can one-up that. As a freshman In 1965, I was biking across from the Library to Berkey Hall and when the sidewalk ended, and somewhere near the MSU Union, I was ticketed for going the wrong way on a one-way street. It was all of about two buildings in length. What a shock! Marjorie Roberts Cincinnati, OH Here are some more Spartan shared experiences: 1. Having lunch with your friends at the Union cafeteria, 2. coping with driving on campus during summer construction, 3. visiting the children’s park and the greenhouses on campus, and 4. belonging to the MSU credit union. Norman Abeles MSU Professor of Psychology East Lansing 1. Found a new alumni club, 2. serve as president of an alumni club, 3. have a personal interview with Dr. John Hannah, 4. join

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Some more from a 1950s Spartan: Walking up the marble steps of the old library, Parties in the Forestry Cabin, Sunday Dinners in the MSU Union, The Barracks, the Quonsets, the Flattops, the Faculty Bricks, The “Pony Backfield,” The Tower Guard and Mortar Board, Excalibur, Green Helmet, Blue Key, the State Theater, Water Carnival, Parking your car on Grand River, Compulsory ROTC, the Short Course Cafeteria, #2 pencils provided by the examiner at every test, coffee at Kewpee’s, chaperones at every dance and party, and Late Minutes. Name Withheld By Request East Lansing

2004). SOAR will greatly enhance astrophysics at MSU. Looking out in the infra-red is very helpful to probing fundamental issues such as the age of the universe. SOAR should also provide, through MSU, a multitude of outreach opportunities to help build relationships with children and astronomy students in Michigan and around the world. SOAR exemplifies MSU’s stature as a world-class institution. I encourage all alumni and friends to visit the observation room on campus to experience the thrill of watching MSU scientists unlock secrets of the Universe. By the way, the photo of SOAR’s infrared camera that you referenced was not included in the publication. Dr. Robert J. Pressley, ’54 San Francisco, CA ☛ Here’s the photo of the Spartan Infrared Camera, left out of the Summer 2004 issue in our final edit. –Editor.

Where can I learn how to “have MSU in your email address,” one of the 50 items that make someone a Spartan? Karen L. Schmidt, ’75 Oil City, PA ☛Visit www.msualum.com, click on the Members Only/Other Features link, then the Email Forwarding link. Lifetime email forwarding is one of more than 60 benefits of MSUAA membership. –Editor. SOARLY MISSED Thanks for “The Sky’s The Limit For The New Soar Telescope” (pp. 16-20, Summer

UPDATE Wallace Jefferson (see Winter 2002), ’85, justice of the Texas Supreme Court, has been named Chief Justice by Gov. Rick Perry. Jefferson is the first African American member of the Texas Supreme Court. PAGE 3

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AROUND CIRCLE DRIVE Tom Hannah, former MSU executive vice president Roger Wilkinson, Trustee David Porteous (partly hidden) and President McPherson unveil the new John Hannah statue on Sept.17.

HANNAH STATUE IS DEDICATED Kicking off MSU’s sesquicentennial celebration, the statue of John Hannah was dedicated Sept. 17 before hundreds of MSU administrators, donors, alumni and friends. The 7-foot bronze statue, designed by California sculptor Bruce Wolfe, depicts MSU’s 12th president walking across campus, facing the Hannah Administration Building. Crediting Hannah with democratizing higher education, MSU President Peter McPherson noted: “When he took over as president on July 1, 1941, an American higher education revolution began. Hannah saw opportuniPAGE 4

ty. And he built. Hannah saw closed doors. And he opened them. Hannah saw talent. And he recruited it. Hannah saw what would work here. And he internationalized it. Hannah saw a college that could be transformed into a great university. And he made it so.” Indeed, Hannah was the person most responsible for turning MSU into one of the largest and most respected universities in the world. Under his leadership MSU grew from 6,000 to nearly 40,000 students and became Michigan State University. Hannah’s association with MSU began in the 1920s when he was with the Cooperative Extension Service and spanned to the

1980s when he served as president emeritus. The sculpture is the first project of the “Public Art on Campus Initiative” of the Public Art on Campus Committee. The MSU Board of Trustees and McPherson unanimously endorsed Hannah as the subject for the sculpture. Also a part of the Sesquicentennial celebration will be the publication of a three-part series on the history of the university.

various events in the university’s history, has been issued by the Sesquicentennial Celebrations and Traditions Committee. The calendar’s images are part of MSU’s photographic collection held at University Archives and

SESQUICENTENNIAL CALENDAR The official 2004 Sesquicentennial Calendar, the fourth of five anJames Gratz nual calendars depicting FALL 2004

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Historical Collections. The black and white images hark back to the early and mid1900s, including photos of the Women’s Building (Morrill Hall), the Spartan Marching Band, the MSU planetarium, and the stadium. They cost $12.95 plus $5 S&H. ☛ You can purchase the calendar at www.shop.msu.edu or by calling 517-355-2330. MSU DISCOVERS NEW ISOTOPE MSU scientists at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory under the direction of assistant professor Andreas Stolz have discovered a new rare isotope of the element germanium (Ge). The isotope, with 28 neutrons, is identified as germanium-60. “Rare isotopes once existed on earth and have long since decayed,” explains Aaron Galonsky, professor at the NSCL. “Rare isotope research is essential for understanding how the elements—and ultimately the universe—were formed.” MSU, home to the nation’s most powerful accelerator for rare isotope research, is one of the few places in the world where such a discovery can be made. Based on current theories of nuclear matter, Ge-60 will be the last such rare isotope found. The discovery could help solve the puzzle surrounding the origin of the elements. MSU RANKED TOPS IN BIG TEN The latest U.S. News & World Report rankings of universities listed MSU 41st among the nation’s “best value.” Indeed, MSU was the only public Big

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Ten university and the only public university in Michigan to achieve that lofty status. The magazine calculates “best value” by comparing academic quality to the net cost of attending for a student receiving average levels of financial aid. Says Terry Denbow, vice president for university relations, “It shows a pattern of excellence and a recognition that access and quality can go together.” MSU also ranked 30th among the “Top 50 Public National Universities,” tied with Indiana University. MSU’s Eli Broad College of Business was ranked 20th in the nation. GREAT LAKES CENTER MSU will be an integral part of the new Center of Excellence for the Great Lakes and Human Health, Ann Arbor, funded by a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The center will focus on human health effects in the Great Lakes in three main areas— drinking water, beaches and harmful algal blooms. “MSU has a very strong history in microbiology,” says fisheries and wildlife professor Joan Rose, who heads MSU’s role in the project. “By combining the aspects of waterborne diseases, which are caused by micro-organisms, and expertise in microbiology, as well as an understanding of the Great Lakes system, we can start to address some of these areas that have been neglected.” Adds project co-director Phanikumar Mantha, professor of civil and environmental engineering and geological sciences, “We at MSU have strengths in the areas of pathogens, microbial ecology and hydrology and modeling.” He adds that “an investment in health and the environment is an investment in our future prosperity.”

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Between now and MSU’s Sesquicentennial in 2005, Fred Honhart, director of MSU Archives and Historical Collections, will regularly highlight key moments in MSU history. – Editor. In the 1890s future MSU president Kenyon Butterfield (19241928), then superintendent of MSC’s Farmer’s Institutes, embarked on a campaign to advertise the college to the public. Enrollment had been basically static for the previous decade with an average freshman class of around 125 students, and MSC wanted to significantly increase this number. In addition to distributing numerous publications about the college, Butterfield convinced several railroads in Michigan to run excursion trains to the campus during one week in August. In 1897, the first year of this event, it is estimated that more than 3,000 visitors came and caught a glimpse of campus. In his annual report of 1898 President Snyder noted: “As is usual with persons who visit the College for the first time, they were very happily surprised at the beauty of the campus and the number and character of the buildings.” The excursion trains continued to roll well into the second decade of the 20th century. It is interesting to note that the advertising efforts would appear to have been successful, as freshman enrollment more than tripled from 135 in 1897 to 450 for the class of 1913. MSU Archives & Historical Collections

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Images Courtesy of Wharton Center

STUDENT ACCESS TO WHARTON CENTER MSU’s Wharton Center has introduced the most aggressive student ticketing program in the nation. Students can obtain $25.00 tickets to the MSU Federal Credit Union Broadway at Wharton Center shows, and $15.00 tickets to the Michigan Radio Wildcard attractions. “The best seats are available,” notes Bob Hoffman, Wharton Center publicist. Students will be able to enjoy a terrific array of performance arts, such as the new Mel Brooks musical The Producers (Dec. 712), the biggest Tony Award winner in Broadway history, and Movin’ Out (Feb. 1-6, 2005), a musical that combines the music of Billy Joel with the choreography of Twyla Tharp. Among the many jazz attractions are the Dirty Dozen Brass Band (Nov. 19), the Count Basie Orchestra with Nnenna Freelon (Jan. 28, 2005), Russell Gun & Ethnomusicology (Feb. 11, 2005) and Laissez Le Bons Temps Rouler! (Feb. 16, 2005). The Chamber PAGE 6

for creating a permanent endowment for the LeFrak Forum. The Forum, also known as the Symposium on Science, Reason and Modern Democracy, sponsors lectures, conferences and publications, as well as graduate, post-doctoral and senior fellowships—all devoted to the theme of “the theory and practice of modern democracy.” To receive the full grant, MSU must match the funds on a threeto-one basis. “This challenge grant is both an honor and a challenge,” says Arthur M. Melzer, political science professor and one of the program’s three co-directors. “The clock is ticking. We have only three-and-a-half years in which to raise the $1.5 million match.” The specific mission of the LeFrak Forum is “to place theoretical issues in practical context and policy issues in philosophical perspective,” explains Richard Zinman, forum co-director and University Distinguished Professor of political theory in James Madison College. ☛For more information, visit lefrakforum.msu.edu.

Music Society of Lincoln Center will perform a World Premiere Wharton Center Commission on Feb. 10, 2005. MSU KUDOS Every semester, MSU faculty, staff and students garner kudos too numerous to list exhaustively here. Some examples: Fred Honhart, director of University Archives and Historical Collections, has been named president of the International Council on Archives/Section on University Research Institution Archives. Jeanette Wrona Klemczak, assistant professor of nursing, has been named by Gov. Jennifer

AWARD FOR LEFRAK FORUM MSU has been awarded a $500,000 “challenge grant” from the National Endowment for the Humanities—a first for MSU—

MSU BOASTS TOP K-9 UNIT MSU boasts the largest K-9 unit of any university in the U.S., with six expertly trained dogs and their handlers/officers (see photo). It is also the largest K-9 explosive-detection team in Michigan. “Our dogs have been especially helpful in both on- and off-campus searches for recreational drugs and bomb sweeps, especially post 9/11 with the numerous visits to campus by U.S. and foreign dignitaries,” says Sgt. Matt Merony, canine unit supervisor of MSU’s Dept. of Police and Public Safety. MSU has had 23 dogs since 1984, mostly German shepherds or Belgium Malinois. They un-

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Granholm as Chief Nursing Executive for Michigan’s Dept. of Community Health. Four MBA students from The Eli Broad Graduate School of Management—Akilah Ellis, Carlos Johnson, Laith Maddur and Kendall Sykes—earned firstplace honors at the National Black MBA Case Competition in Houston, TX, beating 30 other teams from such schools as Duke, UCLA, MIT and the University of Michigan.

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VET MED CENTER FOR ONCOLOGY The College of Veterinary Medicine’s new Center for Comparative Oncology is under construction and Phase I of the project, the Animal Cancer Care Clinic, could open in Fall 2005. The clinic consists of two floors surrounding a light-filled central atrium, with an intensity modulated linear accelerator and a radioisotope therapy area underground, along with resident, postdoctoral, technician offices and conference areas. The upper floor includes the reception area, patient examination rooms, conference rooms, a quiet room, in-patient hospitalization areas, chemotherapy administration and diagnostic imaging suites, treatment areas, and minor surgery rooms. It will also house faculty and staff offices and teaching laboratories. Phase II will add two additional upper floors that will house research laboratories, a large lecture hall, smaller conference rooms, and additional offices. Dr. Barbara Kitchell, one of the nation’s leading veterinary cancer experts, has been named the center’s director. Kitchell expects the center to participate in clinical trials and basic science research, studying “wild” types of cancer.

Tim Potter

dergo a four-week training and cerfication program along with their officer/handler at a facility about 100 miles from campus. After that, they undergo monthly 8-hour training programs. “They are an extremely valuable asset,” sums up Merony, “and they represent a crucial part of our community policing program.” MSU’s K-9 Unit—(Front, l to r) K-9 unit director Matt Merony with Xena, and Danial Munford with Kaia; (back, l to r) Gary Heckman with Sam, Chris Rozman with Chico, Lorrie Bates with Athena and Paul Kuchek with Rambo.

TAILGATE CHANGES ARE EFFECTIVE New MSU rules on tailgating went into effect with the Illinois game Oct. 9, and the results were deemed positive. “Everything has been going a lot better,” says Sgt. Florene McGlothian-Taylor of MSU Police and Public Safety. “The students were cooperative. We had no arrests related to any drinking games. And ground crews reported that post-game cleanup took half the time than normal.” Sgt. Taylor notes that there were no calls for anyone being incapacitated by alcohol. In previous home games, those situations arose at a pace that alarmed university officials, who imposed two new tailgating rules: The banning of drinking games, such as beer pong, and opening the campus parking lots no more than five hours before kickoff, and closing them two hours after the game ends. ☛ For more information, visit www.homefootball.msu.edu.

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MAJOR HONOR FOR FESTIVAL The MSU Museum and the Kresge Art Museum have been honored by the Michigan Humanities Council on Sept. 30 as having initiated projects that are

ranked among the state’s 30 most outstanding humanities projects during its 30-year history, from 1974-2004. The winning projects were selected from 1,500 projects and

TREE GENOME DECODED An MSU scientist helped to decode the genome of a poplar tree—populus trichocarpa—thus opening up enormous possibilities, including using the fastgrowing tree as a potential alternative energy source to oil. Kyung-Hwan Han, forestry professor and researcher at the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, was part of an international team that figured out the poplar’s DNA code. “We can use the information to pinpoint which genes cause the tree to go dormant in winter and become active in the spring,” explains Han. “(We can also) explore how global warming might affect this process.” Yet another possible value of the code is that microbiologists

can eventually tweak the tree’s genes to increase its consumption and storage of carbon dioxide, thus making for cleaner air. “This opens up a whole new field of biology that’s little understood,” notes Daniel Keathley, chairperson of MSU forestry.

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each demonstrates the diversity, quality, historical and cultural content, and community impact of the council’s grants program over the years. The MSU Museum’s Great Lakes Folk Festival was named “Most Outstanding Humanities Project, 1974-2004.” This annual event, produced by the Michigan Traditional Arts Program at the MSU Museum, showcases the traditional cultural treasures of the nation’s Upper Midwest and a sampling of the best of traditional artists from around the country and the world. “The MSU Museum is honored by this recognition by the Michigan Humanities Council on the occasion of their 30th anniversary,” says Kurt Dewhurst, museum director. “The projects recognized reflect truly successful collaborations with other community partners to connect humanities scholars with public life of the people of Michigan.” The other winners included Kresge Art Museum’s “Wrapped Words: Handmade Books from Cuba’s Ediciones Vigia” (2002), and the MSU Museum’s “Uneasy Years: Michigan Jewry During Depression and War” (2003) and “A Community Between Two Worlds: Arab Americans in Greater Detroit” (1998). DETROIT VOICES AT MSU The words of prominent African Americans such as author Alex Haley, musician James Brown, and former Detroit Piston Dave Bing will be accessible to the public through an online archive at MSU. The project—Voices From Detroit: American Black Journal Online—will give access to interviews from Detroit Public Television’s “American Black Journal” over the past 36 years. PAGE 8

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“This project underscores MSU’s 21st century land-grant commitment to inclusion and of offering the community broad access to knowledge,” says Lou Anna K. Simon, MSU provost and president-designate. “It is an outstanding example of a longterm collaborative partnership that links university researchers with external organizations.” Funding is provided by a $285,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. GRANT FOR MSU COLLEGE OF LAW MSU College of Law has been awarded a $100,000 grant to help

create and support the college’s new Small Business/ Nonprofit/Entrepreneurial Law Clinic. “The goals of the new clinic are to assist would-be and existing small business owners in developing their entrepreneurial prowess, to counsel Michigan’s many nonprofit entities in their business endeavors, and to provide a rare opportunity for MSU law students to develop special expertise in transactional business law practice,” says professor Michele Halloran, tax clinic director and clinical

ALUMNI CAREER SERVICES By Keith A. Williams, Executive Director I’m pleased to announce another member benefit. As an agreement with MSU Career Services and Placement, if you graduated from MSU one year ago or more and need career guidance, the MSU Alumni Association will be at your service. Effectively immediately, the MSUAA will be your contact point for a wide array of career services. To avail yourself of our Alumni Career Services, you need to be a member of the MSUAA. Membership in the MSUAA gives you access to our database of alumni, regional clubs, and college constituent groups, networking tools that can really be helpful in advancing your career, especially in the second or third career transition stages. We have an experienced staff that can help with all the issues facing job seekers, including placement contacts, how to write resumes, how to plan a jobseeking campaign, and so on. We hope this service will also bring many young alumni, who are most likely to use our career services, into our association. The more people who join us, the stronger and more useful our network becomes. Alumni who receive job search help from

professor. The grant is funded by the Coleman Foundation’s Awareness and Education program. MSU is currently working to match funds from law firms and alumni. The clinic is the seventh in the college to provide community service in the Lansing area. Second- and third-year law students, under the supervision of Halloran, clinical programs director and clinical professor MaryAnn Pierce and other attorneys, offer legal services to a wide array of clients.

our Alumni Career Services can participate in the MSU Alumni Network (ACAN), which helps current students in the career exploration process. Check out our web site at www.msualum. com/careers. Here you can link to top-notch employers, post your resumes for review by employers, examine job listings posted by employers seeking MSU alumni, and have your resume critiqued if needed. Career assessment resources are also available. Our network of volunteer leaders in regional clubs throughout Michigan, the United States and around the world can provide career help. Some alumni volunteers are willing to distribute cover letters and resumes from alumni to MSU alumni in their geographical areas. Constituent groups on campus operate similarly. Employers can post job listings for experienced applicants on the Alumni Career Services web site at www.msualum.com/careers/jobs/ or send them to [email protected] In addition, a resume database is provided (free) so employers can review the resumes of MSU alumni of interest. I can tell you, based on many testimonials and even gifts we’ve received from successful alumni, that this process works. Go Green!

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A DVA NC I NG K NOW L E D G E . and W elcome... congratulations! “Thanks in large part to the generosity of the alumni and friends listed here, Michigan State University continues to

The following individuals and organizations have made a significant financial commitment to Michigan State University, qualifying them for lifetime recognition in one of the university’s nine donor societies.

$1,000,000 or $1,500,000 planned gift Frank S. Kedzie, the eighth president of MSU, is considered a pioneer for private support to the university. The Kedzie Society is one of the university’s most prestigious donor recognition groups. W. BRUCE ERICKSON

Listing includes new society members from July 1, 2003-June 30, 2004

Minneapolis, Minnesota

DR. AND MRS. KIRKWOOD E. FABER

flourish as one of the

Greenville, Michigan

nation’s leading centers

WILLIAM N. HURJA Redwood City, California

of learning and scholarship. On behalf of the $10,000,000 or $15,000,000 planned gift

entire university family, I want to welcome them as the newest donors recognized in

DR. PAULA R. KNEPPER Rockville, Maryland

DENNIS P. NYQUIST East Lansing, Michigan

MSU’s giving societies.” “Private support is essential if we are to sustain the excellence in teaching, research and outreach that has characterized Michigan State for nearly 150 years. The commitment and support shown by these dedicated

From 1870 to 1910, William J. Beal served as one of the most influential faculty members in MSU history. His many accomplishments included perfecting the laboratory method of learning and becoming the first to cross-fertilize corn. The namesake of Beal Gardens, he is considered the “father of seed testing in America” and a champion of reforestation.

TIMOTHY R. AND PATRICIA E. OREN Redwood City, California

JACK D. AND MARILYN E. RUTHERFORD Burr Ridge, Illinois

W.K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION

$500,000 or $1,000,000 planned gift

Spartans is invaluable, and we thank them.”

$5,000,000 or $7,500,000 planned gift Joseph Williams, the first president of “The Agricultural College of the State of Michigan,” displayed a dedication to the college’s success that began building the strong foundation for what is today Michigan State University. The Williams Society is the highest university honor for donors.

For more information, please write or call:

University Development Michigan State University • 4700 South Hagadorn Road • Suite 220 East Lansing, MI 48823-5399 • (517) 355-8257 or visit us on the web at www.givingto.msu.edu

President Shaw served as the eleventh president of MSU, introducing new courses including Hotel Administration, Public Administration, Geology, Geography, and Physical Education for women. MR. AND MRS. GREGORY E. BRADBURY New London, North Carolina

RICHARD H. BROWN Ada, Michigan

A. J. HARRIS, II Washington, District of Columbia

GLENDA AND PETER LAPPAN DAIMLERCHRYSLER CORPORATION FUND

East Lansing, Michigan

BRUCE W. AND TERRI G. MILLER Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

ELIZABETH DIFANIS PHILLIPS East Lansing, Michigan

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T R A N S F O R M I NG L I V E S . MARK SIMON

JACK AND MARLYS GRAY

Boca Raton, Florida

Minneapolis, Minnesota

GEORGE B. SMITH AND MARY ELIZABETH SMITH Plymouth, Michigan

KRISTINE A. STEENSMA, M.D. Berkeley, California

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS GRIMES

Saginaw, Michigan

DRS. MARK & TOULA GUILFOYLE ANASTASIA & DOROTHEA GUILFOYLE

MR. AND MRS. JAMES C. BEACHUM

Sand Point, Michigan

GARY C. AND MARGARET A. VALADE Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

DR. ERNIE AND LEANNE BALCUEVA

Tiburon, California

Hickory Corners, Michigan

DR. JOHN AND JANICE BURCHFIELD THOMAS AND MARY KRIGAS

DOUG AND VALERIE DEMARTIN J. FRANK AND BERTHA MAE DENNIS $250,000 or $500,000 planned gift

SCOTT AND PATRICIA ESTON RANDY AND CHERYL FEDEWA MARSHALL D. AND LEE K. NEWELL

IRWIN FOUNDATION ERIC HANS AND JANICE M. BAUMAN

JOHN AND MARCIA MILNE Bethel, Connecticut

JOHN W. MUIJE Las Vegas, Nevada

DIANE AND IRVIN NAYLOR York, Pennsylvania

Wakefield, Massachusetts

Burbank, California

The Abbot Society was established to honor one of the first presidents of MSU, Theophilus Abbot, who led the university from 1862 to 1885. Abbot promoted growth, secured critical government appropriations and furthered MSU’s prestige as the nation’s first agricultural college.

Lambertville, Michigan

Davisburg, Michigan

Grand Rapids, Michigan

CRAIG AND LISA MURRAY

MR. AND MRS. LARRY A. MILLER

Summit, New Jersey

Battle Creek, Michigan

DAVID AND LINDA MEHNEY

San Francisco, California

Holland, Ohio

Arlington Heights, Illinois

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE J. MARKHAM

LARRY P. MILLER

Lansing, Michigan

Mountain Lakes, New Jersey

KATIE AND JOHN WELSER

Deckerville, Michigan

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

WILLIAM BENOIT

HERBERT W. AND JOAN H. KIRBY

FRANK AND MYRTLE MERRIMAN

RICHARD AND DEBRA O'CONNOR Northville, Michigan

DeWitt, Michigan

MR. AND MRS. EUGENE N. PARKER

West Palm Beach, Florida

TAMARA Y. GERBER MICHAEL AND ELAINE SERLING

Homewood, Illinois

Chicago, Illinois

Orchard Lake, Michigan

CHARLES L. SNYDER

DR. AND MRS. WILLIAM H. GREENWOOD III

Lincoln, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

MICKEY AND DEBBIE STERN

DRS. MARK & TOULA GUILFOYLE ANASTASIA & DOROTHEA GUILFOYLE

JERRY AND MARY PEARSON Naples, Florida

MRS. BETTY JANE PETERSEN-NEUMANN Lansing, Michigan

Orchard Lake, Michigan

Sand Point, Michigan

Columbia, Maryland

DR. WENDY K. WILKINS AND MR. JAY A. RODMAN

J. C. HAEFNER, D.V.M.

DONALD B. BRIGGS

Okemos, Michigan

Fountain Valley, California

DR. EILEEN M. WILSON

PHILIP J. HICKEY, JR. AND REEDY D. HICKEY

MRS. FLORENCE E. RICHARDSON East Lansing, Michigan

RON AND SHARON ROGOWSKI Beals, Maine

Sarasota, Florida

WILLIAM AND LINDA CHEESEMAN

DeWitt, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

Marietta, Georgia

JOHN E. AND PATRICIA R. CHIPMAN

DR. AND MRS. JAMES A. HINESLY

Galesburg, Michigan

Ann Arbor, Michigan

STEVE AND LYNN COLLINS

$100,000 or $200,000 planned gift

Jackson, Michigan

DALE E. HISSONG Mason, Michigan

EDWARD DEEB

DR. ROGER HOOPINGARNER

Grosse Pointe, Michigan

Holt, Michigan

JOHN AND MARNIE DEMMER Lansing, Michigan

DAUN C. DICKIE, PH.D. Gainesville, Florida

Jonathan L. Snyder served in the role of MSU president from 1896 to 1915, transforming the office of the president with an aggressive administrative style that focused on innovation in higher education.

ANTHONY J. AND NANCY J. HOPP Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

SPENCER AND JULIANNE JOHNSON Okemos, Michigan

ED AND CAROL SCHOENER St. Clair Shores, Michigan

WILLIAM M. SEIFERT Wellesley, Massachusetts

STEVE AND LAURIE SHANKER Novi, Michigan

GARY AND LISA SHIFFMAN West Bloomfield, Michigan

CHARLES AND KAREN SMITH Lansing, Michigan

DR. ROBERT L. AND SHELLEY A. SNYDER Midland, Michigan

DAVID J. STANTON & ASSOCIATES, INC. DBA WENDY ’S

ROBERT AND BONNIE KNUTSON

Wakefield, Massachusetts

DAVID AND PAT SPARROW

Lansing, Michigan

Harbor Springs, Michigan

DR. RONALD E. GOLDSBERRY

KAY BILLINGS AYLESWORTH

DAVID AND SHERYL LIVINGSTON

MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL W. STRAUS

Charlevoix, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

SCOTT AND PATRICIA ESTON

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

Dallas, Texas

continued

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A DVA NC I NG K NOW L E D G E . ROBERT OLSTEIN ENOCH AND NANCY JEN

Greenwich, Connecticut

Hudsonville, Michigan

ROLLAND AND MARY PATENGE

MARTIN LOUIS CLEMENS Nashville, Indiana

DONALD G. AND JOANN C. JOSWICK

Boyne City, Michigan

Kalamazoo, Michigan

JOSEPH AND SUZANNE COLUCCI Donors Continued—

Clarkston, Michigan

RALPH AND ALICE POLUMBO SCOTT AND KATHLEEN KAUFMAN

Plymouth, Minnesota

Pacific Palisades, California

ROBERT AND ELLEN THOMPSON

WILLIAM F. AND HARRIETTE C. COOK Greenville, Michigan

Plymouth, Michigan

WARREN AND ANNELIESE WOOD East Lansing, Michigan

WASHBURNE D. WRIGHT Allamuchy, New Jersey

RICK AND DEDE COY Okemos, Michigan

CRAIG AND MARY HELEN CROOKS Ada, Michigan

NELL HENNESSY AND FRANK DASPIT Washington, District of Columbia

MR. JEFFREY S. DEGRAAF $50,000 or $100,000 planned gift The Hannah Society honors the memory of President Hannah, who served the university for forty-six years, twenty-eight of them as MSU’s twelfth president. He is revered by many and guided the university through its period of greatest physical and philosophical growth. HUGH A. ANDREWS Puerto Rico

DICK AND MARIE BELDING Lansing, Michigan

ROB AND JULIE BERTON Raleigh, North Carolina

WALT AND SUE BIELSKI Plymouth Township, Michigan

MR. AND MRS. GARFIELD R. BOWMAN Okemos, Michigan

KATHY AND RICHARD BURGIS East Lansing, Michigan

DR. R. TROY AND KATHLEEN CARLSON, CFNP Hastings, Michigan

DR. AND MRS. RICHARD L. CARPENTER East Lansing, Michigan

JERRY AND STELLA CASH Bath, Michigan

DANIEL AND DONNA CHOJNOWSKI Okemos, Michigan

WILLIAM L. AND MABLE M. PORTEOUS GILBERT A. LAFARE AND MARTHA W. LAFARE

Reed City, Michigan

Cornelius, North Carolina

DR. JACK AND KAREN SUE PREISS East Lansing, Michigan

AL AND CHARLENE LAZETTE Portland, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

JULIE LOUIS-BENAGLIO Livonia, Michigan

Belmont, Massachusetts

SCOTT, TERRI, EMERSON AND COLE DEVON Grand Rapids, Michigan

JANE AND FRED DIBBERN

HENRY AND APRIL RANKE Holt, Michigan

MICK AND AILEEN LUTZ Jackson, Michigan

Croton on the Hudson, New York

DR. AND MRS. LEO DENATALE, JR.

DR. AUBREY RADCLIFFE

DAVID AND MELISSA RIGGS Adrian, Michigan

C. KURT DEWHURST AND MARSHA MACDOWELL East Lansing, Michigan

DONNA MATHIAS MACINNES Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

THOMAS AND ELLEN MALECK Kewadin, Michigan

CURT AND MARA SCHABERG Okemos, Michigan

JUDY AND TOM SCHEIDT Lake Odessa, Michigan

LOUIS M. AND DIANE L. SCHULTZ Orchard Lake, Michigan

Buffalo Grove, Illinois

LES AND DOROTHY MANDERSCHEID JOHN AND JOAN DOBBEN

East Lansing, Michigan

DR. AND MRS. JOHN S. SCHUSTER St. Johns, Michigan

Jackson, Michigan

DANIEL AND MARILYN MARSH SUSAN J. ELSHOLZ Birmingham, Michigan

R. WAYNE AND MARY LEE GWIZDALA

Durand, Michigan

DR. DONALD AND KATHLEEN MARSHALL Kalamazoo, Michigan

Orchard Lake, Michigan

JIM AND KATHY HAISLIP

HARRY W. MAXWELL Portage, Michigan

West Bloomfield, Michigan

RAYMOND AND DONA HANSEN Bath, Michgian

TIMOTHY L. HERNANDEZ Fort Lauderdale, Florida

WANDA J. HERNDON Seattle, Washington

JOHN L. AND MARTHA L. HESSE Eagle, Michigan

PHILIP J. HICKEY, JR. AND REEDY D. HICKEY Marietta, Georgia

PROFESSOR RUDOLPH HUGH, PH.D. Washington, District of Columbia

HARRIETTE PIPES MCADOO, PH.D. Okemos, Michigan

MR. MICHAEL AND DR. ANNA MILLER Okemos, Michigan

CAROL L. MONSON, D.O. AND FRANK E. WARDEN East Lansing, Michigan

JAMES FORGER AND DEBORAH MORIARTY Okemos, Michigan

BRUCE A. AND MARJORIE E. MORRICE Dallas, Texas

GERALD AND DONNA OADE East Lansing, Michigan

NICHOLAS AND KAREN SHERMAN Grand Rapids, Michigan

DR. DUNCAN F. SIBLEY AND MARGARET C. SIBLEY East Lansing, Michigan

MARY JANE AND TED SIMON East Lansing, Michigan

DR. S. PAUL SINGH East Lansing, Michigan

LAWRENCE AND MARJORIE SOMMERS Okemos, Michigan

MARTIN GIBBS AND CAROLE SORENSON East Lansing, Michigan

DRS. GEORGE C. AND IDA J. STOCKMAN Okemos, Michigan

ROBIN A. STORM East Lansing, Michigan

MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL W. STRAUS East Lansing, Michigan

JAMES M. AND CAROL A. TAYLOR Farmington Hills, Michigan

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T R A N S F O R M I NG L I V E S . GUY P. AND ALISHIA M. TERRILL JOHN AND MARTHA BRICK

Grand Haven, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

WARREN P. AND DEBORAH L. THOMAS Palos Park, Illinois

EDWARD A. BRILL

NANCY AND DENNIS GERSHENSON Franklin, Michigan

New York, New York

DR. ILONA L. TOBIN

SHANE H. BULLOUGH

Birmingham, Michigan

DONALD F. AND JOSEPHINE GIBBS

DR. CURTIS AND MARY LIECHTY

Onondaga, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

MARY LOUISE AND ROLAND S. GIFFORD

DR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. LOWE

Okemos, Michigan

Woodbury, Minnesota

NEIL AND JUDITH GILBERT

BOB LOWES

Muskegon, Michigan

FREDERICK E. AND W. LYNNE TRIPP East Lansing, Michigan

MS. JOANN P. BUNCE Midland, Michigan

DUANE AND JUDY VERNON

JAMES AND RISHAN BUTLER

Lansing, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

ROBERT E. AND DARLENE R. WENNER Haslett, Michigan

DR. L. SUSAN CARTER Lansing, Michigan

JAMES L. AND SUSAN B. WHALEY Bay City, Michigan

STEVE AND CHRISTINE CEREZ Rochester, Michigan

DAVID AND HOLLI WINCLECHTER JAMES A. COLMAN

West Windsor, New Jersey

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

MR. WAYNE L. COREY Grand Rapids, Michigan

TOM AND SALLY CRAWFORD $25,000

Essex, Connecticut

TOM AND CHRIS CURTIN Chartered during the university’s first capital campaign, Beaumont Tower Society is named after the one landmark that so thoroughly symbolizes Michigan State University, its history and traditions.

East Jordan, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

Naples, Florida

Okemos, Michigan

BRIAN ANDRESS (LBC '82) LINDA AULICINO (LBC '83) Novi, Michigan

SAMUEL AND SUZANNE BAKER East Lansing, Michigan

DR. AND MRS. HENRY C. BARRY Holt, Michigan

MICHAEL E. AND KATHLEEN M. BENS East Lansing, Michigan

ROB AND JULIE BERTON Raleigh, North Carolina

RICHARD AND ANNE BLAZO Dearborn, Michigan

ROBERT AND MICHELLE BONNER Canton, Michigan

WILLIAM R. AND JEAN M. GUILFORD

OLIN E. AND JANICE M. MACE

Hemlock, Michigan

Lansing, Michigan

CHERYL D. HAYES

MARTIN H. MALIN

Bay City, Michigan

Oak Park, Illinois

MR. MICHAEL L. AND MRS. LISA A. HERRINTON

WILLIAM AND HILARIA MCALLISTER-ARMENTEROS

Oakton, Virginia

Commerce Township, Michigan

ELEANOR F. HEUSNER

DR. PATRICK M. MCCONEGHY

East Lansing, Michigan

DeWitt, Michigan

R. WILLIAM HOLLAND, PH.D. MRS. CLAUDIA D. HOLLAND

MARY N. MCINTYRE Ann Arbor, Michigan

Darien, Illinois

ROBERT L. AND KATHY D. HOOD

DRS. BARBARA AND DOUGLAS MERCER

East Lansing, Michigan

Byron, Michigan

MARTIN AND PAT JAHN

DAVID C. MOLENAAR

Burr Ridge, Illinois

East Lansing, Michigan

MR. JOSEPH M. JANCA

DR. MICHAEL J. AND MARY C. NOVELLO

Owosso, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

IRMA AND GORDON JOHNSON

TOM AND MARGIE OGDEN

Felch, Michigan

Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan

DR. JOHN KAUFMANN MRS. JEAN KAUFMANN

DR. DAVID PAWSAT AND DR. CLARA REGAL

LEO V. AND NOLA J. DEAL SAID DEEP Dearborn, Michigan

SHARON AND JEFF ARMSTRONG

Santa Barbara, California

GEORGE AND NANCY DAVIDSON

East Lansing, Michigan

GERALD AND JEAN ABEN

Frankfort, Illinois

DR. AND MRS. GARY T. DENSLOW Tulsa, Oklahoma

GARY J. DILLEY Raleigh, North Carolina

LARRY AND LOIS DIMMITT Topeka, Kansas

GARY AND DEBORAH EAKER Charlotte, North Carolina

DR. WILLIAM M. AND JAN L. FALLS East Lansing, Michigan

HIRAM AND DOLORES FITZGERALD DeWitt, Michigan

ED AND CAROL FRANCZEK Glencoe, Illinois

PAUL AND ELLEN GALE Grand Ledge, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

RUTH AND DONALD KECK

ROBERT A. RENTON, D.V.M. SUSAN R. BERG, D.V.M.

Big Flats, New York

Howell, Michigan

MRS. CYNTHIA A. KRAGT Okemos, Michigan

WILL ROLINSKI Gaylord, Michigan

EUGENE T. LACROIX AND NANCY J. LACROIX

DRS. DAVID AND MARGARET ROVNER

Jenison, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

BRIAN AND DARYL LARSEN

ROBERT E. RUIGH

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Lansing, Michigan

AL AND CHARLENE LAZETTE

MR. AND MRS. TODD A. SCARLETT

Portland, Michigan

Clarkston, Michigan

DIANE AND MARK LEYDA

PAT AND STEVE SCHEID

Brighton, Michigan

Belvedere Tiburon, California continued

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A DVA NC I NG K NOW L E D G E . MS. CYNTHIA M. GRUEBER TOM AND CAROLYN CALDWELL

Columbia, Missouri

McCordsville, Indiana

DR. JOHN N. HARKER

CARL AND SUE ANN WILT

PATRICK AND MARY KAY CAMERON

Natchez, Mississippi

Donors Continued—

MR. STEVE HELLSTROM

P.K. AND VIVIAN WONG

MICHAEL A. AND SUSAN A. CARLIN

Okemos, Michigan

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

ALLAN AND KAY SCHMID East Lansing, Michigan

DAVID BALAS AND JIM SELLMAN Saugatuck, Michigan

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD E. SOUDERS Mason, Michigan

STEVEN T. AND ESTHER M. SPEES East Lansing, Michigan

BARBARA C. AND JAMES F. STEIDLE Okemos, Michigan

BOB AND JUNE STERLING Lansing, Michigan

MARCIA AND OTTO STOCKMEYER

PAUL A. MEADERS AND CYNTHIA E. WYMER

DR. FRANKLIN CARMONA AND DR. JACQUELINE WALSH-CARMONA

Troy, Michigan

Troy, Michigan

DENNIS AND MARY J. YAMAMOTO Reno, Nevada

MARILYN H. COCHRAN East Lansing, Michigan

C. MICHAEL AND BELINDA COOK

St. Helena, California

Okemos, Michigan

MRS. DOROTHY J. YOUNG

WILLIAM A. AND KATHRYN J. COOK

Williamston, Michigan

Rochester, Michigan

ROBERT ZELMANSKI

RICHARD AND PEGGY CORDRAY

East Lansing, Michigan

Grove City, Ohio

ADAM AND SHIRLEY ZUTAUT

DR. ROBERT AND BARBARA DAVIS

Mason, Michigan

Portage, Michigan

DR. BOB DEANS Okemos, Michigan

WILLIAM CHARLES AND LINDA STOCK TREVARTHEN Okemos, Michigan

TOM AND MARY JO TUORI, JR. Ada, Michigan

JOHN B. AND BEVERLY A. WEBB East Lansing, Michigan

JEFF AND JULIE WELLMAN Boyne City, Michigan

GREG, DAWN, MEGAN AND MICHAEL WILLIAMS Okemos, Michigan

WOODROW WILSON, JR. AND SHIRLEY A. WILSON Albion, Michigan

WILLIAM R. HUTCHINSON DRS. CARRIE AND MAXIE JACKSON PHILIP M. AND LAURIE A. JANSEN DAVID T. AND PHYLLIS A. JOHNSTONE DR. LEE N. AND SHIRLEY A. JUNE STEVEN AND CAROL ANN KARLOWSKI Westchester, Illinois

Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida

Lansing, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

Lansing, Michigan

$10,000

DAVE, PAT AND THERESA TOME

PAMELA T. AND STEPHEN A. HORNE

Englewood, Colorado

JOANNE W. SWEENEY

Farmington Hills, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

Novi, Michigan

Cass City, Michigan

JAMES M. AND CAROL A. TAYLOR

ANDY AND ALICIA HOPPING

East Lansing, Michigan

BIRNEY AND LORRAINE SUMMERS

Atherton, California

Schaumburg, Illinois

Battle Creek, Michigan

DR. DONALD A. YATES AND JOANNE M. YATES

East Lansing, Michigan

DAVID AND SARA TAFT

Safety Harbor, Florida

Ballwin, Missouri

Established in 1963, the Presidents Club was the first donor recognition group created at Michigan State University and remains the largest. DRS. LEE MONSEIN AND STACEY ACKERMAN

STEVE AND SARAH DEYOUB Oxford, Michigan

DR. ARTHUR TAI DR. JOAN KEISER

MEGAN DONAHUE AND MARK VOIT

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

HAROLD E. AND DOROTHY J. FEARON Tempe, Arizona

DAN AND CAROLYN FISCHER Maumee, Ohio

Washington, District of Columbia

BETTYE G. PRICE JOYCE J. ALLEN Glendale, California

TIM AND BETH FLORY Ada, Michigan

MICHAEL C. FOURNIER Royal Oak, Michigan

MARK AND SUSAN (HARPER) ALLEN Eagon, Minnesota

KENDALL AND JACQUELYN FOX Livermore, California

KINDY FRENCH Washington, District of Columbia

MARIANNE GALLOWAY Okemos, Michigan

SOUTH KOREA

JONATHON D. KOENIGSBERG, J.D. West Bloomfield, Michigan

KATY BAETZ-MATTHEWS AND BILL MATTHEWS Novi, Michigan

ROBERT G. AND CAROL A. MAY JOHN MCCALLA AND KIM SORDYL STEVE AND SUZI MCVOY Columbus, Ohio

GALE AND FAME ARENT DeWitt, Michigan

MR. KYUNG-KIL KIM

Portland, Oregon

MIKE AND CAROL ANDERSON Grand Ledge, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

Austin, Texas

LARRY ALTERMAN Rogers, Arizona

THEODORE R. KENNEDY AND JEAN GRANVILLE KENNEDY

CHERYL M. GILLIAM Grayslake, Illinois

DR. AND MRS. ASCENSION C. MENA

Brighton, Michigan

DR. GEORGE R. AND ROSEMOND GRANTHAM

MICHEL AND RITA METZNER

DAVID G. BROWNING

Titusville, Florida

Portage, Michigan

JOHN AND SANDRA BARBER

Kingston, Rhode Island

El Paso, Texas

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T R A N S F O R M I NG L I V E S . GREGORY AND LISA NOWAK Rochester, Michigan

DR. LOGAN A. ONEY

MR. AND MRS. TIM AND HEATHER SOULE Mason, Michigan

Grosse Pointe, Michigan

LARRY AND FAYLENE OWEN

GREGORY AND LISA SPEAKS Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

JAMES J. AND KIMBERLY A. PALMER

FAYE C. BACKIE AND STEPHEN R. SZILVAGYI

Rochester Hills, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

JOHN C. PEIRCE, M.D.

MR. AND MRS. BRIAN SZYMANOWSKI

Paradise Valley, Arizona

Saint Joseph, Michigan

JAY AND SUSAN PEPPER

RICK AND IRENE TANGHE

Franklin, Michigan

Troy, Michigan

DRS. CHRIS AND DEBRA PETERSON

TERRIE E. TAYLOR, D.O.

East Lansing, Michigan

Traverse City, Michigan

MARJORIE POWERS

THOMAS THIVIERGE

Troy, Michigan

Rochester, Michigan

MICHAEL J. RANDELS

DR. CRAIG J. AND KRISTIN A. THOMAS

Oak Hill, Virginia

Wauwatosa, Wisconsin

ROBERT W. RATHKE

DOUG AND SHELLY THOMAS

Royal Oak, Michigan

Alpharetta, Georgia

GRAY R. AND LEAH A. REYNOLDS

DONALD M. TIERNEY

Farmington Hills, Michigan

Toledo, Ohio

DR. AND MRS. DONALD L. ROBACH

ROBERT A. TREMAIN

Auburndale, Florida

Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

University Development

DOUGLAS B. ROBERTS

JIM AND KAY TROSKO

East Lansing, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

Michigan State University • 4700 South Hagadorn Road • Suite 220 East Lansing, MI 48823-5399 • (517) 355-8257

PAUL AND CAROL ROSE

JEFF AND CARMEN VANDEVEER

Hillman, Michigan

Chicago, Illinois

THOMAS ROSS III

DR. AND MRS. CLARE D. WEIDMAN

Houston, Texas

Eagle Rock, Virginia

MERRI JO BALES AND RANDY SAHAJDACK

DR. WILLIAM W. WELLS HELEN W. WELLS

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Northport, Michigan

DR. E. RENÉE SANDERS-LAWSON AND DR. BILL E. LAWSON

DRS. GARY AND CATHERINE WESTFALL

For more information, please write or call:

or visit us on the web at www.givingto.msu.edu

Okemos, Michigan

Okemos, Michigan

DON WHEELER WILLIAM E. AND J. MURIEL SAUL

Frankfort, Illinois

Okemos, Michigan

DAVID W. SCHRUMPF

LESLIE E. PAPKE AND JEFFREY M. WOOLDRIDGE

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Mason, Michigan

ERIC FREEDMAN AND MARY ANN SIPHER

WILLIAM G. AND JUNE PIERCE YOUATT East Lansing, Michigan

East Lansing, Michigan

JOHN H. ZWARENSTEYN HARVEY AND NANCY SOLWAY Birmingham, Michigan

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Dollar amounts listed are minimums for recognition in each giving society. Current gifts can be cash, securities, property or gifts-in-kind and are payable over a five-year period. When establishing a planned gift, credit can be given for previous cash gifts.

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SPARTAN PROFILES Scott Thacker

RAY HEARN: YOU DA ARCHITECT He has been chased by boars in Alabama, attacked by rattle snakes and spiders in Costa Rica, and heaved by strong updrafts while flying an ultralight plane over the Pacific Ocean. All these are par for the course for Ray Hearn, B.S. ’83, B.L.A. ’89, one of America’s rising golf architects. After serving 10 years as a senior designer for Matthews & Associates, he founded Ray Hearn Golf Course Designs, Inc., Plymouth, in 1996. He proceeded to build a string of successes, such as the Grande Golf Club in Jackson and Hemlock in Ludington, named by Golf Digest as “Top Ten You Can Play” successively in 2002 and 2003. Hearn has won national awards for Sea Oaks, Little Egg Harbor, NJ, where he adroitly combined elements from Augusta National and Pine Valley; for Mistwood, Romeoville, IL, a routing tour de force; and for Fox PAGE 16

Hills Strategic Course in his hometown of Plymouth. Most recently, Yarrow in Augusta opened to rave reviews, while Macatawa Legends in Holland is sure to receive similar acclaim this fall. “I never want anyone to look at a golf course and say ‘There’s a Ray Hearn designed course,’” says Ray. “My goal is that each golf course maintain its own identity and remain true to the characteristics of the land it is built upon and the tenets important to its owner.” That philosophy, combined with his sheer creativity in golf design, has landed Ray two plum national projects—a spectacular resort course in Queopos, Costa Rica, right next to a tropical rain forest, and a major 36-hole resort course in Franklin, CT, for which legendary architects likeTom Fazio and Pete Dye were also considered. “I have the utmost respect for Fazio and Dye as designers, but every once in a while the

young underdog wins,” he notes. “Thank goodness they picked me. They said they liked my design concepts and my passion.” Or, put another way that is familiar to golf fans, they let Ray know, “You da man!” WENDY BAKER: THE HEALING POWER OF HORSES In The Horse Whisperer (1998), a little girl and her horse are severely injured in an accident, but both recuperate with the help of a mystical healer (played by Robert Redford). This story rang so true for Wendy Baker, ’77, an editor at Yahoo!, that she saw it multiple times. And it rings even truer now that she has just published The Healing Power Of Horses: Lessons From the Lakota Indians (BowTie Press, 2004), which recounts the stories of 12 Oglala Lakota Indians of Pine Ridge, South Dakota, and how they are healed by horses. “We all have tragedies in life, and the secret is FALL 2004

to treat them as opportunities,” explains Baker, who moved to Burbank, CA, after 12 years as a book and magazine editor in New York City. “For example, a horse was the source of my problems, but a horse became the solution.” Indeed, as recounted in her book, Wendy suffered from rheumatoid arthritis in her knees and could hardly walk when her mother gave her horseback-riding lessons. “It gave me the freedom, mobility, and self-confidence that I had lost,” recalls Wendy of her childhood in Ann Arbor. She chose MSU “to get away from home, without going too far away.” At MSU she was greatly inspired by creative writing professor Al Drake, which led to an editorial career in New York City with DoubleDay, Harper & Row, and US and Conde Nast Traveler magazines. In 1990 she moved to California, and four years later suffered a major horseback-riding accident with three broken limbs. Again, what saved her was a horse called Mollie. “She has one eye In 2002, Wendy tried a rodeo horse in Pine Ridge, North Dakota, home of the Oglala Lakota Indians.

MSUALUMNIMAGAZINE

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and we’re a great fit,” says Wendy. “She is my legs and I’m her eyes.” After her accident, she became very interested in the Oglala Lakota Indians. “At one time the horse was absolutely central to Lakota culture,” she explains. “So I wondered, what is their relationship with horses today?” This curiosity led to the first of many trips to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation where once there were three times as many horses as people, but now only 10 percent of the population have horses. Wendy interviewed these individuals and families, and learned—as she documents— that the horse, while still considered a sacred being, is now primarily used for emotional and spiritual healing.

BRUCE MCCRISTAL: SPIRIT OF MICHIGAN STATE If ever a book was a labor of love, The Spirit Of Michigan State (InnerWorkings, 2004) fits the category—having taken 11 and a half years to assemble all 512 pages and 440 photos. But Bruce McCristal, ’54, puts his magnum opus in perspective. “William J. Beal wrote the history of our first 50 years in five years,” notes McCristal, a retired General Motors executive in Bloomfield Hills. “It took Madison Kuhn 13 years to write First

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Hundred Years, which was published in 1955. I’m writing about 150 years, so it does not seem quite as long.” Nonetheless, Bruce spent years researching MSU history, even reading reports by the State Agricultural Society of Michigan in the 1850s. The result is a tome that contains just about every positive achievement by MSU and its alumni, faculty and students. “This has all the wonderful things about MSU all pulled together in one place,” says Bruce. “It will give you sales ammunition on all kinds of activities.” The book contains a year-byyear timeline of MSU, 150 highlights to commemorate MSU’s sesquicentennial, listings of all NCAA and Olympic champions, and chapters of all kinds of individual and departmental achievements. Bruce literally grew up on the campus, the son of a professor, and while a student worked for legendary sports information director Fred W. Stabley. At General Motors he rose to head public relations at Cadillac, GM Hughes Electronics Corporation, and the AC Electronics Division. He served as a pilot in the U.S. Air Force and has served as chairman and vice chairman of MSU’s Development Fund, and on the national board of the MSU Alumni Association. His new tome has a hefty price of $49.95, but as Bruce notes, “All the profits from the book are going to Michigan State University.” The book is available at Barnes & Noble, Borders, and Amazon.com. ☛ For more information, visit www.spiritofmichiganstate.com. ATHENA TRENTIN: MONSTER HOUSE CREW In June, the Discovery Channel’s Monster House featured its first all-female crew. Five women builders successfully converted a

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desert home in suburban Los Angeles into a surfer’s paradise. One star was Athena Trentin, ’96, M.A. ’00, an international student advisor at California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, and a licensed master plumber (a skill she learned while working at MSU’s Physical Plant). In the episode, she was seen crawling under the house to install water and drain lines while fending off spiders and other effluvia. “I didn’t look like my normal gorgeous self,” says Trentin with a hearty laugh. “When I came out of hibernation, I looked pretty disgusting!” Nonetheless, Athena, a native of Escanaba and member of the Little Traverse Band of Odawa Indians, ranks it as one of her top accomplishments—especially having just recovered from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. “We had to haul 7,000 pounds of concrete,” she notes. “I had no idea if I was going to get a relapse.” When first diagnosed with CFS in 1999, she recalls, “I

couldn’t move, my body felt 10 times heavier, the lymph nodes under my arms were so swollen I couldn’t turn around in my car to reach the buckles, and I had a constant sore throat.” The doctors only knew it was an immune disorder and were not able to help. So she took matters into her own hands. She discovered that yoga helped. “One reason I believe I got sick is that I had so many goals I just kept going and going and ignored signs from my body,” she explains. The other thing that helped were herbal medicines, such as cat’s claw. After finishing her MSU master’s degree in 2000, she felt strong enough to move to southern California (in late 2001). The Monster House gig was a calculated risk, but it has paid off. “Today we’re the best of friends,” she says of her crew. Next up for Athena: Completing her doctoral degree in international education from the University of Southern California in 2006. PAGE 17

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Dallas Cowboy Weekly

FLOZELL ADAMS: FRANCHISE HOTEL At MSU, he was nicknamed “Hotel” and made All-American offensive lineman in 1997. Now it might be time to change the nickname to Marriott or Hyatt. Two years ago the Dallas Cowboys designated him as the team’s first “franchise” player. And with his reported five-year $25 million contract and $10 million signing bonus, left tackle Flozell Adams, ’98, could well buy his own franchise hotel. At 6-feet-7, 357 pounds, he has emerged after seven professional seasons as one of the NFL’s top left tackles—a key position for quarterback protection. “MSU helped me a lot,” says Adams. “Coach (Nick) Saban prepared me to be the player that I am, and the person that I am.” He also credits former MSU assistant coach Pat Shurmur, now quarterbacks coach for the Philadelphia Eagles, with being a mentor. “He’s the guy who recruited me in Chicago and just recently at the Pro Bowl I hung out with him.” Though he does PAGE 18

not have the time to watch MSU games, he keeps track of the team. “I was disappointed about the Rutgers game,” says Flozell. “But they’ll be fine. It takes time to get going, especially the offensive line. You need to learn about each other and know what everyone is doing on each play. That takes time.” He raves about his current coach, Bill Parcells. “He’s a great coach,” says Flozell. “He’s a player’s coach. Everybody likes what he does. He’s straightforward, no secrets. If you want to know, he’ll tell you. If you don’t want to know, he’ll tell you.” In his free time, Flozell has gone into business, opening a clothing store in Lansing called Brick City, and getting into real estate development. In July, he kicked off his new housing development in Runaway Bay, TX. His company, FR Adams Luxury Homes, is building homes in the $169,000-$386,000 range. “We sold six units before we even started,” he says. “Right now we’re putting up five more homes.”

DAVID P. O’MALLEY: RISING SPARTAN IN HOLLYWOOD In 1942 Glenn Miller put Kalamazoo on the map with his hit recording, I’ve Got A Gal In Kalamazoo. In 2005, film producer and director David P. O’Malley, ’69, hopes to do likewise with the movie Kalamazoo, a comedy about three 28-yearold women trying to destroy a time capsule prior to their 10th reunion so that they will not be embarrassed by their predictions. “It’s a wacky, caperish comedy,” says O’Malley, a rising Spartan in Hollywood who has enjoyed success in the film industry as an actor, writer, director and producer. “But it’s also a comedy-drama about facing your goals and what’s important about life, and the choices you make.” Coincidentally, Dave is a native of Battle Creek. He came to MSU to study “radio, television and film,” and in his senior year, he and fellow Spartan Tom Chapman wrote a script about the Baja Marimba Band that landed them an Emmy award for Best Entertainment Special. After a stint as a radio news director in Santa Barbara, CA, Dave wrote and produced his first

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film, Deadly Fathoms, in 1974, winning the Silver Medal at the Atlanta Film Festival. Since then, he has received credit in 12 films as a writer, 7 as a director, 4 as a a producer, and 4 as an actor. “I like them all for different reasons,” he notes. “Being a producer is really hard, but you learn a lot. Writing is terrific because you start off with a blank page and it’s all creativity. But I probably love directing the best because you get to work with so many different people.” In Kalamazoo, Dave gets to work with such stalwart actors as Claire Bloom and Chita Rivera. Perhaps his best known film was 1993’s Fatal Instinct, a send-up of mystery thrillers in the style of Naked Gun. Dave credits MSU with giving him “the basics” about filmmaking and “a great general education.” And he says he runs into many Spartans in Hollywood. “Whenever I wear my Red Wings cap,” he notes, “you won’t believe how many people I meet at the grocery store.” O’Malley directs Dee Wallace Stone (of ET fame), and (inset) Claire Bloom and star Josie Davis (right).

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Michigan State University Alumni Association

The MSU Alumni Association would like to take

LIFE MEMBERSHIP

university through Life Membership in the

this opportunity to welcome our newest life members. We thank you and commend you for your willingness to share our commitment to this great Alumni Association.

Joseph and Katharine Allen Taylors, SC

Michele Gesquiere Sterling Heights, MI

Kevin and Kathleen Lynch Chicago, IL

Erin and Eric Romanuk Royal Oak, MI

Jeffrey and Sharon Armstrong Okemos, MI

Diane and Michael Grieves Cocoa Beach, FL

Michael Maitland Chicago, IL

Bettina Sauter Chesapeake, VA

Paul Begick Bay City, MI

Terry Hallead Oxford, MI

Nancy Marquez Coral Gables, FL

Stefan Schwarz Lake Orion, MI

David and Patricia Bender Somerset, NJ

Phillip and Cindy Harwood Farmington Hills, MI

David Massaron Grosse Pointe Woods, MI

James Siemers Battle Creek, MI

Lawrence Blyly Hartford, MI

Robert Henes Bronxville, NY

Lisa and Steven McKone West Bloomfield, MI

David Silberstein Chestnut Ridge, NY

Steven Bolhuis Cincinnati, OH

Jessica Hewitt and Matthew Thomas Macomb, MI

Andrew Mclemore Lansing, MI

Clyde and Rosalyn Stretch Boynton Beach, FL

Michael Milan Hessel, MI

Marc Thompson and Sarah Blessing Fenton, MI

Brendan Bolhuis Grand Rapids, MI Jon and Michelle Bricker Royal Oak, MI Erik and Kelly Brown Chicago, IL Thomas and Ann Burgoon Rockford, MI Timothy and Keri Conlon Holland, MI Cari Cullin Whitmore Lake, MI Cynthia Fates New York, NY Erik Fielbrandt Bay City, MI Timothy and Jacquelene Finegan Sterling Heights, MI Brian and Lori Frohock Oxford, MI Erica George Dayton, OH

Eric Homberger Belleville, MI Terry Inch and Tamara Richardson-Inch Clarkston, MI Heather Irwin-Robinson Ontario, Canada Martin Kane Concord, NC Matthew Kelly Western Springs, IL Myda Korkigian Fisher Franklin, MI Craig and Mary Lehmann Troy, MI Paul Lindstrom Concord, NH Jonathan Lock Brentwood, TN Mary and Mark Lunetta Okemos, MI

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Ronald Milz Novi, MI Marc O’Connor Las Vegas, NV Bruce and Laurie Ofenloch Charlotte, NC Christina Oney Ann Arbor, MI Ralph Panella San Jose, CA William Price Waterford, MI Tara Reinholz Troy, MI

Jennifer and Justin Varner Grandville, MI Gary and Susan Wachler Huntington Woods, MI Virginia White Okemos, MI James and Peggy White Evanston, IL David Work Grand Ledge, MI Lauren Youngdahl Jackson, MI

Christopher Rice and Casey Schurkamp San Ramon, CA Michael and Pamela Richmond Kalamazoo, MI

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The McPherson Y Kurt Stepnitz/University Relations

Robert Bao Peter McPhersonBypushed productivity Perhaps no photograph better to a new level and symbolizes Peter McPherson’s 11-year tenure as MSU’ MSU presiadvanced s

dent than his presiding over the unveiling of the John A. Hannah statue on Sept. 17, the kickoff event for MSU’s Sesquicentennial celebration.

When seeking adjectives and accolades to bestow on McPherson, one word recurs—“Hannahesque,” as in John A. Hannah, the mastermind of MSU’s modern growth from 1941-69. After McPherson steps down Jan. 1, 2005 as MSU president, he can look back over his 11-year tenure and take pride in one of the most productive eras in the university’s history. His era was “Hannahesque” in every imaginable way, from the flow of concrete to changes that will have a major impact on the university far into the future. As the accompanying timeline makes clear, and as future historians will record, McPherson has cast a giant shadow over his alma mater and left an imprint comparable to that of his mentor, the great John Hannah. Indeed, McPherson unleashed the biggest wave of new construction on campus since the Hannah years. He spearheaded many visionary changes

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that will benefit MSU years down the road. He launched a $1.2 billion capital campaign that will take MSU to the next level academically. He tackled key national education issues, such as rising tuition costs and binge drinking on campus, earning national attention. He brought people of national stature to campus as commencement speakers, and also as McPherson lecturers. He worked to implement his visions for MSU, such as leading the nation in Study Abroad. He fought tirelessly and strategically to secure funding and other advantages for the university. He thought outside the box to bring a law school to campus, perhaps completing the last mosaic in John Hannah’s ultimate vision for the university.

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MSU Trustee David Porteous and President McPherson (right) at the dedication of the Hannah statue.

The McPhersons hosted many events in Cowles House, including the historical Cotillion in 1995.

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Photo Courtesy of the U.S. Treasury

“I am proud of the many accomplishments of faculty, students and staff over the past 10plus years,” he said after announcing his departure plans at the spring undergraduate commencement ceremony at Breslin Center. “From the Guiding Principles to the Biomedical and Physical Sciences Building to the 20-20 Vision. From becoming the nations’ leader in study abroad to dramatic growth in external research funding. From the Honors College renaissance to the Beaumont Tower renovation. “I was honored to be president for a national debate championship and a national basketball championship. We now have a law school on our campus. It’s been exciting and invigorating.” McPherson boasts strong MSU roots. He earned a bachelor of arts in political science from MSU in 1963. His family’s ties with the university run even

McPherson receives the Distinguished Service Award from U.S. Treasury Secretary John Snow (left) and Under Secretary for International Affairs John Taylor (right). deeper; both his parents are MSU graduates, as are all seven of his brothers and sisters. And his grandfather, Melville, for whom he is named, was a member of the board that elected John Hannah MSU president in 1941.

Why, with that background, would he leave MSU? McPherson says that while serving in Iraq as the financial coordinator for the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance last year, he had time to reflect on

both his future and that of the university. “Every decade or so, it’s important to have new ideas,” he explains. “Big organizations need to have change. “It’s been 11 wonderful years. I’ve deeply enjoyed this role.” The appreciation for McPherson’s contribution to MSU has flowed from newspapers, alumni, and friends. In a statement, Board of Trustees Chairperson David Porteous said, “On behalf of the Board of Trustees, collectively and individually, I express our deepest gratitude to Peter McPherson for his outstanding leadership.” McPherson’s departure will mark the end of the longest-serving president-provost team in the Big Ten. “I have had the privilege to work closely with Peter, who is a valued colleague and good friend,” says Provost Lou Anna K. Simon. “He works tirelessly to raise MSU’s profile and reputa-

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE MCPHERSON YEARS

1994 • Establishes “Guiding Principles” for MSU following campuswide dialogue • Names Lou Anna K. Simon as Provost • Promulgates “Tuition Guarantee,” which held tuition increases to the rate of inflation, to enhance access to MSU • Hires Nick Saban to replace George Perles as football coach • First Lady Joanne spearheads the founding of MSU Safe Place, the first such campus facility in the nation • Named chair of the Presidents Council, State Universities of Michigan

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1995 • Establishes affiliation with the Detroit College of Law, which has since moved onto campus and been renamed the MSU College of Law • MSU’s Eli Broad College of Business and Graduate School of Management offers Weekend MBA Program • President Bill Clinton becomes first sitting president to be commencement speaker since Teddy Roosevelt in 1907 • Prevails on state legislators to increase MSU’s base funding for technology by $10.4 million a year

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tion as a globally connected institution, advancing our study abroad programs and other international initiatives, even while continuing our commitment to the communities and people we serve nearer to home.” McPherson is looking at several options, including development in impoverished nations, broader public service and finance. During his stint in Iraq from May to September 2003, he was instrumental in establishing the central bank in Iraq and worked with international banks as they began to invest in and establish themselves in that country. “I want opportunities to do something beyond this presidency, and I want to be readily available for them,” he explains. McPherson will leave MSU with some major projects still under way, including the $1 billion capital campaign, which has surpassed the $800 million mark earlier than expected, a record-

In 2003, McPherson went to Iraq at the behest of U.S. President George W. Bush to help rebuild its economy. He is shown standing near his office in Baghdad. setting achievement that, in his words, has “accelerated institutional momentum and broadened confidence in our faculty, staff, and students as MSU prepares to celebrate its sesquicentennial.” In the coming months, as MSU celebrates its sesquicentennial, his

1996 • Rededication of the Beaumont Tower bells, silent since 1987 • Launches initiative to dramatically expand overseas study • Cornerstone ceremony for the $14 million Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Institute for Materials Research • Promulgates “Technology Guarantee,” which provides student access to information technology

time and energies will focus on two historic efforts—bringing the nation’s Rare Isotope Accelerator to MSU and continuing the expansion opportunities of the College of Human Medicine. Making history and creating a “great university that is responsive, effective, and efficient” have

been the hallmarks of the McPherson presidency. As a Lansing State Journal editorial concluded in October, “Under McPherson, MSU has become more students, more research dollars, more private donations, more international study programs, more well-known.” The Detroit News added, “He has made the university a better place for students, and a better bargain for Michigan taxpayers.” Those who work at MSU have also come to appreciate First Lady Joanne McPherson, who last year received the Honorary Alumni Award for her indefatigable support for MSU and its athletic teams, and for helping found MSU Safe Place, the nation’s first on-campus shelter. “Joanne’s involvement throughout the university is significant,” says Keith A. Williams, executive director of the MSU Alumni Association. “Joanne is the driving force behind many of MSU’s Homecom-

1997 • Dedication of MSU Law School Building • Dedication of National Food Safety and Toxicology Center • MSU joins international consortium to build the SOAR telescope • Pioneering “virtual” courses are offered by four colleges • Named by President Clinton to the Commission on International Development, Cooperation and Trade

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ing events. She is involved with the annual Parade, the Green and White Brunch, and is also the chairperson of the MSU Homecoming Court Selection Committee.” She also chairs several planning subcommittees of the MSU Sesquicentennial and the annual MSUAA Kaleidoscope Committee. As a member the MSUAA’s National Alumni Board, she served on the Alumni Center Committee. Under both Peter and Joanne, Cowles House has become a tremendously active and welcoming place, hosting some 100 events a year. Some highlights of McPherson’s presidency: ☛The “Guiding Principles,” providing MSU with a renewed “practical vision.” ☛The Tuition Guarantee that allowed MSU for seven consecutive years in the 1990s to hold tuition to the rate of inflation, something no other major university in the nation was able to do.

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☛ Affiliating with the then-Detroit College of Law , now the MSU School of Law. ☛ Growth in Honors College enrollment from 1,000 students to over 2,500. ☛ Declaring Study Abroad a university priority, resulting in a tripling of enrolment in the program as MSU became the nation’s leader in undergraduates studying internationally. ☛The largest facilities growth since the Hannah Era, with major facilities constructions and expansions including the Biomedical and Physical Sciences Bldg, Agriculture Hall Annex, Beau-

mont Tower renovation, Koo International Academic Center, Eustace-Cole Hall, Henry Center for Executive Development, McPhail Equine Performance Center, Smith Student-Athlete Academic Support Center, the MSU Law School Bldg, and the new addition to Spartan Stadium that will house both University Development and the MSU Alumni Association. ☛ Establishing the 2020 Vision Plan, an in-depth campus directive for space quality, land use, facilities development, and environmental sensitivity in long-range planning. McPherson, a former Peace Corps volunteer himself, has consistently called upon MSU students “to dream and act globallyto think beyond yourselves in lives of public service.” During his MSU presidency he has set an example. “He’s a fixer, in the purest sense of the word,” wrote Detroit News business columnist Daniel

Howes last June. “He likes to tackle big problems—famine in Africa 20 years ago for the Agency for International Development, binge drinking on campus, meaningful education for blighted urban areas or the restoration of Iraq’s economy.” McPherson was appointed by President George W. Bush as chair of the Board of International Food and Agriculture Development and serves as co-chair of the Partnership to Cut Hunger in Africa. He chaired reform commissions on Michigan’s charter schools and Lansing’s public schools. Last May, he took a five-month leave to head the economic reconstruction of Iraq, at the behest of President Bush. As the Lansing State Journal editorialized, “Whatever the differences some may have with President Peter McPherson, there’s no denying his departure from MSU will be a significant loss. MSU will miss McPherson. As will we.”

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE MCPHERSON YEARS

1998 • Dedication of Clara Bell Smith Student-Athlete Academic Support Center, the first such facility in the Big Ten • Renovation of Eustace-Cole Hall begins, launching an ambitious effort to renovate historic “Lab Row” • MSU receives major backing from the National Science Foundation to “couple” its two superconducting cyclotrons

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1999 • Agriculture Hall Annex is completed • “20/20 Vision,” a comprehensive master plan for the campus, is introduced • Launches “MSU Promise,” a continued focus on undergraduate education, research, graduate education, globalization, outreach and diversity. • MSU wins a national award for its commitment to safety and responsible drinking • Lands Jean Chretien, Prime Minister of Canada, as commencement speaker

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The Chairperson’s Perspective With great appreciation for all that he has accomplished I, and the Michigan State University Board of Trustees, offer our thanks to Peter McPherson. We are honored that he chose to spend nearly 11 years as president of this great institution. His strong, energetic leadership of the University has indelibly marked it and has moved it forward in many ways. At the beginning of the 21st century, we are in an excellent position to take MSU to an even higher level. He has served longer than any president in the Big Ten, longer than any MSU president since John Hannah, and his leadership has found expression in many ways. He has served Michigan State University so well, and for so long, that we tend to forget what was not here when Peter McPherson returned home to East Lansing. There was no Biomedical Physical Sciences Building . The Study

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Abroad Program, while significant, was not the leader in the U.S. that it is today . The Livestock Pavilion was an artist’s rendering . There was no MSU College of Law. The Honors College had substantially fewer students. MSU’s tuition was among the more expensive in the Big Ten—and on a fast pace to even greater cost. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory hadn’t received an important upgrade, one that now allows MSU to compete aggressively for the Rare Isotope Accelerator. There was no Diagnostic Center for Populations and Animal Health. The debate team hadn’t won a national championship. These are just some of the accomplishments during the time he has led the team and worked to further improve the University. His knowledge and skills in finance have allowed MSU to weather far better the financial turmoil of the past two years. By the way, we have had excellent re-

2000

turns on our investments during his tenure. Also, his leadership in the Capital Campaign positions the University well as it closes in on the goal of $1. 2 billion in 2007. His vision has allowed him to take Michigan State in new and bold directions. By working hard to secure a partnership with hospital and community leaders in Grand Rapids, we are poised to bring even greater quality of education and experience to the College of Human Medicine. Peter McPherson also served the region, the state, and the country very well. From his participation and leadership on commissions studying education at all levels, to his work to combat hunger and poverty—especially in Africa—to his service on an advisory board to the U.S. Secretary of Energy, he has given the full measure. Above and beyond, his selfless contribution to the reconstruction of Iraq’s economy was a tremendously generous effort, and in the MSU tradition.

We have been fortunate to have Peter McPherson as the leader of this remarkable University. We are also fortunate that he was with us this fall when we began our celebrations for MSU’s 150th anniversary with the dedication of the statue of John Hannah, a president whose leadership inspired Peter McPherson. We recognize that there are new challenges that await you, Peter. As I heard you talk about your experience in Iraq, it was apparent that particularly complex international problems, and your capacity to solve them, present interesting opportunities to serve yet again. Again, on behalf of the MSU Board of Trustees, I express our deep gratitude to Peter McPherson for his outstanding leadership of Michigan State University. David L. Porteous Chairperson Michigan State University Board of Trustees

2001

• Dedication of Mary Anne McPhail Equine Performance Center • Parking ramp at Communication Arts & Sciences completed • MSU basketball team wins NCAA championship • Ellen Taaffe Zwillich’s Fourth Symphony (“The Gardens”) premieres at Wharton Center with Leon Gregorian conducting the MSU Symphony • Dedication of Brook Lodge in Augusta • MSU confers degrees to its first seven “virtual” graduates

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• Dedication of James B. Henry Center for Executive Development • With “coupled” cyclotrons, MSU’s National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory boasts the highest-energy continuous wave accelerator in the world • Trowbridge Road extension adds a major entrance to campus • Served as international observer of elections in Peru • MSU efforts to increase alcohol education via “Action Team” plan is lauded by Michigan Legislature • MSU receives funds from Michigan’s Life Sciences Corridor, a state initiative to promote life sciences research and business development • A virtual professional development program for estate and wealth planning is launched, along with The Estate and Wealth Strategies Institute

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“Covering” McPherson in the Alumni Magazine In one of his first visits to an MSUAA regional club, President McPherson brought along a lamp. He liked to work even during lengthy car rides. Such stories about McPherson and his prodigious work ethic, which includes late-night and weekend phone calls, bolstered his image as Mr. Productivity. He knew so much about this enormous university and its inner workings that he never used notes when speaking to alumni groups. When speaking about MSU, he was like a film buff talking about favorite movies, or an avid golfer recounting favorite rounds. He knew the facts and the details, and he exuded passion for his alma mater. President McPherson has been the source of six cover stories in the MSU Alumni Magazine during his 11-year presidency, the sign of a very active and produc-

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tive president. They include the story of his hiring, of his vision for the university, the affiliation of the Detroit College of Law (now MSU College of Law), the Tuition Guarantee, the visit of President Bill Clinton, and a five-year retrospective of this presidency.

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE MCPHERSON YEARS

2002 • “The Campaign For MSU,” a $1.2 billion capital campaign— the second comprehensive one in MSU history—kicks off • Dedication of Biomedical and Physical Sciences Building, the Delia Koo International Academic Center, and the Alfred Berkowitz Basketball Complex • Lands Vice President Dick Cheney as commencement speaker, the fourth sitting vice president to speak at MSU • Hires Ron Mason as athletics director; John L. Smtih hired as football coach replacing Bobby Williams • Shaw Lane Parking Ramp and bus terminal completed

2003 • MSU Study Abroad leads the nation, according to figures compiled by the Institute of International Education • Served six months as financial coordinator in Iraq for the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance • Acquisition of one of the world’s first PET/CT scanners allows MSU Radiology to maintain its cutting-edge status • Plans announced for major expansion of Kresge Art Museum • Plans announced for major stadium expansion

2004 • Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health begins operation • Dedication of the SOAR telescope facility in Chile and East Lansing • Honored by U.S. Treasury with Distinguished Service Award • Faculty Oversight Committee formed to explore expansion of College of Human Medicine to Grand Rapids • MSU Debate Team wins the 58th National Debate Tournament • MSU Sesquicentennial kicks off with debut of John Hannah statue • Ongoing efforts continue to secure the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator

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Thank You. Andrew and Sandra Conner spent their working lives at Michigan State University, and their appreciation for MSU has shown during their many years of support. Now, through generous planning, their loyalty will live on forever. You see, they have named MSU as a charitable beneficiary of their estate, accomplishing more for the university than they could have dreamed of doing during their lifetime. “We love MSU, and we are very happy we’ve established this gift,” they said, noting that their future gift provides them with the satisfaction of knowing that the areas they care about most – the Dosser Family/Lyman Briggs Scholarship (named for Sandra’s parents), the Ralph Young Fund, the Physical Plant, the Wharton Center and MSU Safe Place – will be enhanced because of their generosity. Andrew and Sandra Conner, saying thank you by planning for the future of Michigan State University.

The Linda E. Landon Society, named for the beloved MSU librarian and first female instructor on campus, recognizes and honors individuals and families who, through their estate plans, have established a planned gift of any size benefiting Michigan State University. These future gifts can take many forms, such as a bequest through a will or personal trust or one of several charitable life-income plans.

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Office of Planned Giving Michigan State University 4700 S. Hagadorn Rd., Suite 220 East Lansing, MI 48823 517-353-9268 or 800-232-4678 For planned giving answers online, visit www.givingto.msu.edu PAGE 27

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A SPARTAN C ONQUERS

MOUNT EVEREST  By Dale Darling, ’87, M.S. ’91, with Robert Bao

On Sunday, May 23, 2004, I reached the summit of Mt. Everest, fulfilling a decade-long dream to conquer the world’s highest peak. My group of 10 climbers needed more than nine hours to negotiate the last 1,500 feet. We passed three dead bodies, part of a group that went just ahead of us. Six of them, we learned, had died from the extreme conditions just two days before. It was surreal and downright scary, but also awesome and thrilling. Many emotions flooded my brain in a way I can’t describe. But I didn’t take much time to enjoy the view—only about 10 minutes. We had to muster all our energy and focus on the descent, which would take another eight hours to reach the Advanced Camp III, the penultimate camp. The vast majority of fatalities among Everest climbers take place at this stage, when people succumb to exhaustion. How, you might ask, did a Midwest kid like myself get into this two-month ordeal of an adventure? Growing up on a farm in Milan, Michigan, the tallest thing I had ever climbed was a silo. I was first exposed to mountains after I moved to California in 1989 and a friend took me for a hike in the Western Sierras up to some lakes at 10,000 feet. I was immediately hooked. We hiked the Sierras at least once a month up to about 13,000 feet. CLICK RIGHT THROUGH FOR MSU

About ten years ago, I read Seven Summits, by Dick Bass and Frank Wells. I was mesmerized, line by line, as the authors recount their conquests of the highest peak of each continent. It was an inspiration. Their feat has been achieved by fewer than 90 people since. I was enthralled by that vision. So I began to climb progressively larger mountains, Mt. Whitney (14,496 ft.), Mt. Shasta (14,162 ft.) and Mt. Rainier (14,410). Other peaks include Pike’s Peak in Colorado, Mt. Rose, Sawtooth, Castle Peak, Mt. Talac, and Mt. Ralston—all in the Lake Tahoe area. Always in the back of my mind loomed the vision of the Seven Summits. At that time I worked for World Wide Sires, in Visalia, CA, directing exports of dairy and beef cattle frozen semen. “I’m in genetic sales,” I used to tell friends. In

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any case, during my frequent travels to Africa and Europe, I could spot various peaks from the airplane window, including beautiful Mt. Kilimanjaro (19,339 ft.). That’s one of the seven summits, and the first I’d scale. It was not a difficult climb. This past July, I’m told, MSU football coach John L. Smith did so with a group of Spartans—most of them nonexpert climbers—on an MSU Alumni Association tour (see sidebar). After Kilimanjaro I climbed some of the other seven summits—Elbrus (18,481 ft.) in Russia, Aconcagua (22,840 ft.) in Argentina, and Denali’s Mt. McKinley (20,320 ft.) in Alaska, which took me two attempts. These climbs gave me confidence that I could summit Mt. Everest, the world’s tallest peak at 29,035 feet (8,848 meters) and one of the most treacherous. In 2000, I changed jobs and joined Blue Diamond Growers in Sacramento, CA, to direct their exports of almonds. As a condition of accepting the job, I asked them to agree that I could take two months off within five years to climb Everest. They agreed, probably thinking this was apropos of someone in the “nuts” business. PAGE 29

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Growers allowed me the time off. I am deeply thankful to all of them. To prepare myself physically, I organized a strenuous daily regimen of physical fitness. Five days a week, I’d get up at 5:30 a.m. Three days a week I’d spend an hour on a stair machine while carrying a 52-pound backpack. Two days, I’d do it at a running pace. One day a week I’d swim 80 laps, one day a week I’d run 7 to 8 miles. My routine included at least 200 sit-ups, 40-80 pullups and 40-80 dips, because climbers need to be able to pull themselves up with ease. On weekends I’d get at least one

good hike through snow up in the Sierras. Regularly I’d rock climb at the local gym. Often I’d work out twice a day. My goal was to stay at 10 percent body fat. I’m 5-8 and, with four months of that regimen, became quite fit. I weighed 166 pounds before the climb, but right afterwards I was an emaciated 145 pounds. On March 30 our team met in Katmandu, Nepal, and spent a couple of days going through our equipment. We then flew to Lhasa in Tibet, China. Our climb would be via the northern route from China, which is more technical than the southern route through Nepal. It’s also a bit safer, since we bypass the dangerous Khumbu ice fall. We spent a few days getting acclimated to the more than 10,000 feet altitude and visited some monasteries. We then drove towards Everest and went through three small towns, each a little higher in elevation, spending a couple of nights at each town. Then we arrived at the Everest base camp. We had two teams of ten climbers each, plus about 25 Sherpas, Himalayan porters who carry and help set up tents and gear, and who also put in the ropes up high. We basically did very little at base camp. We’d do little day hikes into the neighboring hills. Every other day, we’d walk 5.5 miles to an interim camp. Then one day we’d overnight there, and hike another 5.5 miles to an advanced base camp. You want to get used to

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 Indeed, my quest would seem foolhardy when you look at the history of Everest climb attempts. Only about 1,200— about 15 percent of those who try the arduous task—have ever reached the summit. A good many die trying. Since 1922, more than 171 fatalities have been recorded. In 1970, four climbers made the summit, while eight died trying. But such stats were not enough to discourage me. The sheer excitement of my vision trumped all else. In late 2003 I committed to this climb with Russell Brice of Himalayan Experience. He might be the world’s foremost

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Everest expedition leader, having led 8 percent of all those who successfully reached the Everest summit. He has not suffered a single fatality in 15 years—an unbelievable track record. The cost of the overall expedition was around $45,000. About 85 percent of it came from sponsors—Excel Inns of America, MCS Educational Services of Sacramento, New Factor, Michigan Farm Bureau, Oceanspray, Placer Title Company. The Moosejaw store in East Lansing was essentially a cosponsor, since they gave me major discounts of all my equipment. And Blue Diamond

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They thought that climbing Mount Everest was apropos of someone in the “nuts” business.

the surroundings and progress gradually. No partying of any kind occurs at this stage. Everyone is focused and serious. You want to stay healthy. I also stopped my brutal exercise regimen. At this stage, you want to conserve energy. Basically, we just talked, went out for little walks, relaxed and read. I read 10 books in six weeks, including Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code, and books by Joseph Conrad and Lawrence Sanders. I also wrote a journal. After a week at the advance base camp, we proceeded to hike to the first of four Advanced Base Camps. You have use a rope here and there as you go over rocky terrain, but for the most part, it’s hiking. At all times, I used an ice pick and a jumar—a mechanical device that attaches to a rope and can only slide up. There were some sections when the slopes were 80-degrees and you have to go straight up over ice or rocks, but nothing too severe. As you advance through the four Advanced Base Camps, the idea is to proceed slowly and gradually acclimate to each new level. The really technical aspects of the climb take place in the final leg from Camp IV, at 27,500 feet, to the summit. You have to scale some 25-45 foot vertical rock walls. They are scary, because as you scale them, you face a 2,000 foot sheer drop. You can’t afford any errors. At that altitude, you’re wearing a bulky

down suit and carrying an oxygen tank. The descent is even more challenging. On May 22, we got up around 11 p.m. and started the summit climb at 12:30 a.m. of May 23, in pitch darkness. I drank some hot tea with lots of sugar and half a granola bar. At that altitude, you have no appetite. Once we got to the Advanced Base Camps, about the only things we ate were instant soup and granola bars.

It would take us nine hours to get to the summit, and another eight to get back down to Camp III. That’s roughly 17 straight hours of climbing, plus the time we spent on the summit. While it sounds exhausting, it’s actually not untypical. As we ascended, we spotted a person—then another, and another—sitting on a rock or along the trail. You wonder, why is someone sitting there? Then it dawns on you, “Oh my God,

these are the people who died two days ago.” Reality sets in. You get a feeling of fear and nervousness. You’re humbled. I probably moved a little slower, made sure my footing was firm, and checked the ropes more carefully. All climbers are aware of the risks. You hear stories about near-fatal mishaps from other climbers. For example, one might have started slipping on an icy patch and saved themPhotos courtesy of Dale Darling

Dale Darling (left) reached the summit of Mt. Everest on May 23.

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selves from falling by sticking their axe in the ice. I was very, very lucky. Once, at 28,800 feet, I was going around a traverse that was only a foot wide with an 8,000-foot drop when I noticed the end of my rope was all frayed from rubbing against the rock. It was shredding. My heart basically shook to my toes. It was unnerving. Most climbing deaths do not occur, as the movies suggest, when climbers slip and plunge thousands of feet to their deaths. They occur when one sits down to rest, falls asleep and never wakes up. They freeze to death. Typically, it happens to someone who strays from the team. On your own, you’re more likely to sit down when you get tired. With a group you push each other along and make sure everyone keeps going. Ironically, many climbers die when they attempt to hide from the wind. As they do so, they are more likely to fall into slumber. Besides the cold and inclement weather, another major hazard climbers face is the lack of oxygen. While in Camp IV, I took my oxygen mask off for a couple of hours. While talking to my teammates, I couldn’t remember any of their names or what countries they were from. So I put my mask back on, and within 15 minutes I could remember everyone’s name. 5:30 a.m. was a moment I’ll never forget. Until then we were climbing in darkness. Suddenly the sun rose over the horizon and I could see for 50 miles. It was a stunning view. You could see all the peaks and their shadows. That was neat. But you could also see the 8,000-foot drop-offs, some from ledges that were about two inches. I don’t like heights, so that gave me a real queasy feeling.

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At 9:45 a.m. I reached the summit. It was the culmination of ten years of dreaming and four years of preparation. To be perfectly honest, however thrilling the moment was, my emotions quickly turned to an intense desire to get down safely and quickly. I was totally exhausted, and nervous. We had been on the move for nine hours. Eight out of 10 fatalities take place during the descent, when climbers are tired and running out of oxygen. After taking some photos with banners from the sponsors, I started down. That was challenging, since you have to look down, and as I said, I’m not particularly fond of heights. Many people have asked me whether conquering Everest has been a life-altering experience. I think it has. It definitely makes you more humble. Makes you appreciate life. Makes you want to say “please,” and “thank you.” Makes you let people know you appreciate them today rather than tomorrow as you realize you may not be here tomorrow. Makes you appreciate running water, hot showers, toilets, soft toilet paper, and good food. Number one, you appreciate your family and friends! Also it keeps you close to your religious faith. Within the next three weeks, I ate everything in sight and gained much of my lost weight back. My desire to complete the Seven Summits is still there, but I’m not in a rush right now. I plan to do the Vinson Massif (16,067 ft.) in Antarctica in the next three years. And Mt. Kosciuszko (7,310 ft.) in Australia will happen on a vacation in the next two years.



SPARTANS CLIMB MT. KILIMANJARO On Thursday, July 22, 11 Spartans traveling with an MSU Alumni Association tour reached Mt. Kilimanjaro’s Uruhu Point, at 19,340 feet the highest peak in Africa and one of the world’s Seven Summits. The MSU contingent included football coach John L. Smith, his two sons, Sam and Nick, John McCallie, husband of basketball coach Joanne P. McCallie, Greg Hauser, member of the national alumni board, his son Steve, Gary and Jill Witzenburg, Hal Lehr, and sportswriter Dave Birkett and photographer Jimmy Chin, covering the climb for ESPN Magazine. The team was supported by five guides, a cook and 29 porters. “The sunrise that morning (when he reached the top) has to be the highlight of your life,’’ John L. Smith recalled after returning to campus. “You’re up there at 19,000 feet when that giant red ball seems to come up through the clouds . . . it was phenomenal, almost like a religious experience. “What a moment! I couldn’t stop crying.’’ Jill Witzenburg, scaling the mountain for the second time in two years, lauded Smith’s leadership. “Coach Smith’s determination to reach the peak inspired other team members to fight off nausea, headaches and dizziness to join him,” she notes, adding that from the base camp at Kibo Hut, temperatures dropped to the lower 20s. ☛ For MSUAA tour information, visit www.msualum.com Spartans Atop Kilimanjaro—Assembled at Uruhu Peak are (back, l to r) Gary Witzenburg, Nick Smith, Greg Hauser, and John L. Smith; (front, l to r), Dave Birkett, Jill Witzenburg and Steve Hauser. The four other climbers in the MSU group—John McCallie, Hal Lehr, Sam Smith and Jimmy Chin—reached the peak earlier and had already begun their descent.

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Visit us on the web at www.ShopEastwoodTowneCenter.com Gift Certificates available by calling 517-316-9209 Located at U.S. 127 & Lake Lansing Road

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MSU PLAYS KEY ROLE IN HOMELAND SECURITY By Kirsten Khire and Trent Wakenight, M.A. ’04

MSU is playing a key role in homeland security, such as helping protect the integrity of our food supply.

the U.S. in developing the

coordinator at the National

NCFPD, funded at $15 million

Food Safety & Toxicology

over a three-year period.

Center at MSU.

“MSU is in a very unique position and we bring a lot to the

defense capabilities of our na-

table,” Mather said. “Not only

tion’s food supply is recognizing

do we have strong programs in

that a safer food supply rests

food safety, but we have nation-

upon a safer food supply chain

ally renowned expertise in fields

system. “No longer can we

such as supply chain manage-

think of food protection as a

ment, diagnostics, packaging

problem at just one store,

and criminal justice.”

restaurant, production facility

“A key to MSU’s participation

or processing plant,” says Wak-

is the training of professionals to

enight. “When there is a prob-

be able to deal with intentional

lem at the farm level, for exam-

contamination events, a need

ple, this affects everyone up that

that is currently unfulfilled as

chain to, ultimately, the fork

the U.S. is faced with a lack of

level or consumer level.”

food protection and defense exWith news of the threat of ter-

One facet of shoring up the

For the state of Michigan, this

MSU, who is heading a food

pertise and has few academic

approach presents a dire need.

rorism abroad and in our own

defense education effort

programs that address this

Not only do Michigan residents

country, the specter of terrorism

nationally.

shortage,” says Trent Wak-

consume foods produced in our

enight, educational program

state, but as the number two

looms as near to us today as it

“Our nation’s food supply is

did in the days following Sept.

vulnerable to attack,” Mather

11, 2001. This year has seen a

explains. “It is an area that con-

bolstering of defense protocol in

tinues to be overlooked and yet,

our transportation systems, at

if an intentional contamination

events such as political conven-

event did occur, it would affect

tions and the Olympics in

us all. The human health and

Athens, and in immigration and

economic implications cannot

naturalization policies.

be underestimated.”

One potential target of terror-

Mather and other MSU col-

ism that continues to be over-

leagues met in July with U.S.

looked is in our own kitchens,

Dept. of Homeland Security

workplaces, schools, supermar-

Secretary Tom Ridge and U.S.

kets and restaurants: our food

Dept. of Agriculture Secretary

supply. This point is not lost

Ann Veneman to formalize the

on Michigan State University

creation of a National Center

researchers and educators, in-

for Food Protection and De-

cluding Edward Mather, deputy

fense (NCFPD). Various de-

director of the National Food

partments at MSU will join

Safety & Toxicology Center at

partner universities throughout

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MSU faculty are uniquely poised to investigate supply chain security in general and food security in particular. PAGE 35

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Photos by Trent Wakenight

U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge (right) met with Ian Gray (left) of MAES/MSU and Mather on July 6.

(L to r), Edward Mather of the NFSTC/MSU, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Ann Veneman and David Closs of MSU met in Washington, D.C. on July 6.

A problem at

producer of agricultural prod-

proach was replicated here in

Community Health and the

ucts in the U.S., Michigan foods

Michigan with participants

NFSTC, summit participants

the farm level . . .

make their way to dinner plates

from the grocery industry.

have gathered with a singular

affects everyone up that chain to the fork level

everywhere. “A problem in our

Outcomes from that session

state could trickle down to mul-

included the realization that

gan’s food supply is prepared for

tiple states and an exponentially

there are communication gaps

a contamination event, that it

larger number of consumers,”

throughout our food supply

can prevent such an event, or re-

says Wakenight.

chain, but that there are produc-

spond should an event take

While the NCFPD project

ers, processors, retailers and law

place, and to become equipped

maintains a national focus, the

enforcement personnel dedicat-

to recover from an intentional

NFSTC has been closely in-

ed to tackling the problem.

event.

or consumer

volved in shaping a safer food supply in the state of Michigan.

been reached through a series of

level.

In April, Mather and MSU col-

ongoing Food and Agricultural

leagues participated in a table-

Protection summits conducted

top exercise in Maryland aimed

quarterly in Michigan since

at simulating an actual contami-

June 2003. Convened jointly by

nation event in the restaurant

the Michigan Dept. of Agricul-

industry. In May, the same ap-

ture, the Michigan Dept. of

PAGE 36

mission: to ensure that Michi-

This same conclusion has

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Kirsten Khire is Director of Communication for the National Food Safety & Toxicology Center at MSU; Trent Wakenight , M.A. ’04, is the NFSTC’s Outreach Communicator. MSU ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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MSU SUPPLY CHAIN FACULTY FOCUS ON FOOD SECURITY By David J. Closs The food chain involves all the processes and activities to deliver food from the farm to the fork. To secure this chain, the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security (DHS) sought a team of researchers with both technical knowledge about food safety and business knowledge about organizationing and managing the process to move food from the farm to the consumer. They found that kind of expertise at MSU. A team of MSU researchers had already been investigating ways for firms to enhance the security of their supply chains. This includes the food consumer in the home as well as in restaurants and institutions, as well as transportation companies, government institutions, and

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port operators. Even though Americans consume mainly domestically-grown food, an increasing percentage is imported to allow for “out-of-season” fresh produce. This MSU team included faculty from marketing and supply chain management in the Broad College of Business, the School of Criminal Justice, Computer Science, Diagnostics, Engineering, the Food Safety and Toxicology Laboratory, and the School of Packaging. In November 2003, they hosted a workshop and generated a special report titled “Enhancing Security Throughout the Supply Chain” published by the IBM Center for the Business of Government. It’s clear that MSU faculty were uniquely poised to investigate supply chain security in general and food security in particular. The Criminal Justice and Supply Chain Management team have begun their efforts to examine such supply chain activities as material procurement, manufacturing, warehousing, transportation, inventory management, and customer service, which amount to 30-50 percent of the retail cost of food products. The objective of these activities is to provide food for U.S. consumers when and where they want it at the lowest possible cost. While there has always been concern regarding food security and safety, previous efforts have focused on accidental

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contamination. Since September 11, the focus expanded to include intentional contamination, either via bio-chemical agents or by tinkering with the vehicles and containers hauling the food. Historically, the food supply chain has not focused major resources on improving security because of the low probability of such events and the trust between supply chain partners. Since September 11, however, it has become clear that a terrorist incident could have not only severe health implications for thousands of people, but also severe financial repercussions for the firm and the overall economy. For example, last year’s relatively small incident involving the import of an animal with “Mad Cow” disease from Canada reduced farm prices, or even eliminated the ability for Canadian beef farmers to sell product in the U.S., reduced employment at processing plants and distributors, and reduced availability and/or increased price of beef to U.S. consumers. An intentional event could well produce an even more significant impact. Food firms have already increased their interest in food supply chain security initiatives, ensuring vigilance when the product is on the road or ocean 24/7 even with limited personnel. These initiatives include physical security of buildings and

processes, increased inspections of equipment and processes, certification of domestic and international partners and carriers, application of technology to track and trace product movement and responsibility. Increased inspections help ensure that processes have not been compromised and that transportation equipment has not been compromised with contraband. Formal and informal certification and auditing processes help verify the integrity of other supply chain partners. Finally, new technologies such as Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) help to track the movement and location of vehicles and shipping containers. We also need to minimize the cost of these initiatives so they do not mean higher food prices for the consumer. We need to determine which processes and technologies provide the best return on the security investment. We need to consider trade-offs. We can rely on both interviews with managers involved in enhancing food supply chain security and in statistical analysis. MSU’s research team will try to identify the best use of resources to provide us with a safe, secure, constant, and economic food chain. David Closs is MSU’s John H. McConnell Chaired Professor of Business Administration. PAGE 37

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Celebrate the holidays with Michigan State Pride! THE 2004 COMMEMORATIVE HOLIDAY ORNAMENT ORDER FORM Clip Order Form and Mail to:

The 16th edition of the Commemorative Holiday Ornament Collection is now available. Each year a newly designed and dated ornament is available and will be sent to you strictly on approval. You will be notified in advance and may purchase only if you wish. You can display the ornament this holiday season and for years to come. It will be a cherished remembrance of your college days. Quantities are limited. Don’t get caught without owning the 2004 Michigan State University holiday ornament. Commemoratives-Adams and Adams, Inc is an approved and proud licensee of Michigan State University.

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A L L - A LU M N I D I R E C TO RY COMING IN SPRING 2005. Call (800) 982-1589 today to update your listing, and reserve your copy of this unique collector’s edition.

Michigan State University is celebrating its 150th anniversary

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MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

SPARTAN PATHWAYS 2 0 0 5 T R AV E L C ATA L O G

Amazon River Journey January 29-February 6 Gohagan & Company From: $2,995 (airfare from Miami included) Machu Picchu post-tour: $1,795

All dates and prices are subject to change. Reservations are on a firstcome, first-serve basis. Since the MSUAA partners with other universities many tours fill quickly. It is essential that you make your reservation early to reserve a space on the tour.

Expedition to Antarctica January 16-29 Gohagan & Company From: $4,495, plus air Begin with a three-night stay in vibrant Buenos Aires before proceeding by air to Argentina’s southernmost city, Ushuaia, to embark on the M.S. Le Diamant and begin an eight-night Antarctic adventure. Follow in the wake of Sir Francis Drake and James Cook as you cruise the remote waters encircling our seventh continent, with calls at Penguin Island, Petermann Island, Pendulum Cove, Aicho Island and other landing sites enjoying unparalleled opportunities to view the distinctive bird and mammal life. A fleet of Zodiac landing craft will afford a firsthand look at the natural treasures of the Antarctic, and lectures by trained naturalists will contribute to a greater understanding of one of Earth’s most amazing ecosystems.

Join the adventure of a lifetime on a cruise down the Amazon to explore this exotic region’s vast rainforests, untamed waters and bird, plant and wildlife species not found anywhere else on the planet. Enjoy the comforts of an impeccable river ship that evokes the 19th century’s age of exploration while offering 21st-century amenities. Naturalist guides will lead hikes through lush rainforests and on special excursions down some of the Amazon’s secretive, sinuous tributaries to visit local tribal villages. Experience Peru’s historic capital, Lima, and take advantage of a special, optional posttour program to legendary Machu Picchu, which includes an excursion to the lost sacred city of the Incas. Beauty & Wonder Down Under – Australia & New Zealand February 16 – March 3 Alumni Holidays International From: $5,995 from Los Angeles, plus taxes Embark on an exhilarating exploration of the geologic treasures, majestic glaciers, Victorian towns, sophisticated cities, breathtaking mountains, and primeval rainforests of New Zealand and Australia. In New Zealand, delight in Auckland with its magnificent harbour and mesmerizing expanse of extinct volcanoes. Discover Queenstown, set against the breathtaking spectacle of tranquil Lake Wakatipu and the snow-capped peaks of the Remarkables mountain range. Enjoy the quintessential Victorian charm of Christchurch and the stunning beauty of world-renowned

Web site at www.msualum.com or call (888) 697-2863

Milford Sound. Journey to Cairns, Australia and see the colorful Great Barrier Reef, the world’s largest living organism. Also explore Sydney, with its heady mix of cosmopolitan panache and great natural beauty. Cruise the Waterways and Canals of Holland & Belgium An Alumni College program April 8-16 Alumni Holidays International From: $2,045, plus air & V.A.T. taxes Explore the spectacular waterways of the Netherlands and Belgium on this exciting adventure aboard the deluxe M/S Swiss Pearl. From amid the colorful canals of Amsterdam, travel to the flower fields of Keukenhof Gardens. Then cruise to the village of Kampen and historic Deventer for a special viewing of van Gogh masterpieces at the Kröller-Müller Museum. Visit the Mauritshuis in The Hague, and delight in Delft, home of the legendary blue and white pottery. Continue cruising to the maritime city of Rotterdam, and tour the famous Delta Project on the beautiful Zeeland Coast. The country of Belgium features the Flemish town of Ghent and the picturesque medieval Bruges. Conclude your journey in Antwerp, renowned for its glittering diamond industry. Italy - Orvieto An Alumni College program May 2-10 Alumni Holidays International From: $1,945, plus air & V.A.T. taxes Amid the wonders of Umbria, embark on a journey of personal discovery in one of the most magnificent regions in the world. Explore the quaint streets and delight in a culinary demonstration at Orvieto’s Food Market. Excursions beyond the city’s medieval walls feature the Eternal

City of Rome and the Vatican, a country within a city. Admire the splendor of Florence, the cradle of the Renaissance, where Italy’s artistic genius abounds at every turn. Examine the works of the great masters and try a hand at cooking or photography. Marvel at two Umbrian jewels—medieval Perugia, with one of Italy’s most remarkable squares; and the walled city of Assisi, home to the exquisite St. Francis Basilica. Passage of Peter the Great May 16-28 Alumni Holidays International From: $2,695 from Detroit Now is the time to experience firsthand the “new” Russia of open arms and warm hospitality. Ornate onion domes and winding waterways highlight this historic passage between two fabled Russian cities. Begin in the magnificent capital of Moscow and see Red Square, the famous golden domes of the Kremlin and Lenin’s Tomb. Board a luxury river cruiser designed especially to navigate the rivers and lakes of Russia. Ports of call include the ancient wooden architecture of Uglich; Yaroslavl, the Florence of Russia; the peaceful farming town of Goritsy; and the fairy-tale Kizhi Island. The journey concludes in beautiful St. Petersburg with a visit to the spectacular Hermitage Museum, the former Winter Palace of the Czars.

Tuscany New May 16 - 24, 2005 From: $2,195 per person, plus air An extraordinary vacation awaits you at IL BORGO Di VILLA BOSSIPUCCI, set in the Tuscan hills overlooking the famous Chianti Toscana wine-growing region. Open your senses to the treasures of Italy. If you’ve ever wanted to experience the arts and culture of Italy first hand,

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this is the place to do it with wine tastings, conversational Italian and hands-on Tuscan cooking classes. Study photography, painting and more during a 7-day all-inclusive (land) vacation. These and other “Lessons of Tuscany” are all part of this all-inclusive luxury vacation package that offers you a wonderful way to experience the renowned charms of Tuscany. IL BORGO, (the village) is set on a private 17th-century estate just 30 minutes south of Florence. “Lessons of Tuscany” offers all-suite accommodations, meals at handpicked Tuscan restaurants, daily guided excursions to Florence, Lucca, Siena, Pisa, San Gimignano, all close at hand, plus a special invitation to dinner at a private castle. Village Life in Dordogne May 26 – June 3 Gohagan & Company From: $1,995, plus air Savor the good life in the Dordogne River Valley - one of France’s bestkept travel secrets. From the base medieval town of Sarlat-la-Canéda, explore the region’s numerous historic, cultural and natural attractions, including the prehistoric caves of Fontde-Gaume, Lascaux II and Rouffignac. Follow in the footsteps of Richard the Lionheart at the castle of Beynac, explore the medieval labyrinth of lanes of Domme, enjoy the cliffside town of Rocamadour and savor Périgord’s world-renowned foie gras and truffles. Accommodations will be at the 100-year-old Hôtel de la Madeleine where gracious and charismatic host, Philippe Melot—a highly regarded chef and local historian— will provide insight into the region’s history and architecture in addition to introducing the culinary wonders of Périgord’s traditional cuisine.

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Yorkshire An Alumni College program May 29 – June 6 Alumni Holidays International From: $1,945, plus air & V.A.T. taxes

The Italian Riviera An Alumni College program June 4-12 Alumni Holidays International From: $2,245, plus air & V.A.T. taxes

From the comfort of the charming and distinguished resort town of Harrogate, journey out to discover the grandeur and history of North Yorkshire. Originally a fashionable 16th-century spa, Harrogate is also admired for its elegant Victorian buildings and its acres of immaculate, colorful gardens. Relax like royalty at the elegant estates of Harewood, Castle Howard, and Aske Manor. Brood over the rugged beauty of the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors like the famous Brontë sisters and James Herriot, as well as other distinguished British authors. Explore the ancient streets and cobbled marketplaces of historic York.

Discover the beauty, history and culture of this stunning region on a special travel adventure. The base from which to explore the Riviera is the deluxe Hotel Vis à Vis, located in the seaside resort of Sestri Levante. Walk along its streets lined with pastel-colored houses and revel in breathtaking views of the neighboring bays. Delight in the charms of Santa Margherita, as well as the lovely village of Portofino and the Ligurian capital Genoa. Visit the picturesque village Portovenere, and the towns of the Cinque Terre, declared by UNESCO to be World Heritage Sites. Journey to the nearby Tuscan region to see a sculptor at work in Carrara, famous for its snow-white marble and experience the many delights of Lucca.

Celtic Lands June 1-12 Gohagan & Company From: $4,495, plus air The culture of the Celts comes alive on this journey to France, England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland. Embark on the M.S. Le Diamant in the historic port of Rouen and explore Normandy’s most important landmarks including the D-Day Beaches and the medieval Abbey of Mont-StMichel. Then it’s on to the famous naval hub of Dartmouth, England; Ireland’s literary mecca of Dublin; the E.U. 2005 Cultural Capital of Cork; the magnificent gardens of Wales; and the legendary castles of Scotland before concluding in historic Edinburgh. A special twonight, pre-tour program in Paris featuring accommodations at the Hotel Ambassador is available.

Village Life in Wales June 12-20 Gohagan & Company From: $2,295, plus air Experience the rich culture, long history and natural beauty of Wales on this leisurely paced program. For seven nights, enjoy the Victorian charm and elegance of the historic Imperial Hotel in Llandudno on the coast of the Irish Sea while venturing to explore regional attractions. Highlights include touring the medieval castles of Conwy and Caernarfon; riding the historic West Highland Railway through Snowdonia National Park; viewing the collection of Old Masters at Penrhyn Castle; strolling through Bodnant Gardens; visiting the historic Plas Newydd manor; and attending a live performance by a Welsh harpist. A full program of presenta-

tions about Welsh history, culture and literature, as well as a special “Village Forum” discussion with local residents about life in Wales, is also included. Hidden Fjords of Alaska’s Inside Passage June 17-24 Clipper Cruise Line From: $2,295, plus air This unique Alaskan itinerary provides an in-depth, close-up perspective of America’s last frontier aboard the 138-passenger Yorktown Clipper. Experience the free spirit of Alaska – its bald eagles, pods of humpback whales, vast glaciers, and hidden fjords. This tour travels to the blue Sawyer Glacier in Tracy Arm and visits the small towns and picturesque communities. The Yorktown Clipper is the perfect small ship for exploring Alaska’s narrow waterways and shallow passages. Watch for mountain goats perched on the sheer granite faces of glacially carved ice floes that serve as resting pads for harbor seals. An experienced naturalist will be on board to give insight into the natural wonders of the area. Italy’s Magnificent Lake District An Alumni College program June 20-28 Alumni Holidays International From: $1,845, plus air & V.A.T. taxes Lake Maggiore, second largest of the Italian lakes, is sheltered by an Alpine ring and its breathtaking shores are lined with romantic towns of international renown. Famous for its magnificent colors and the Borromean Is-

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tioned capital of the Canadian Rockies, during a sightseeing excursion en route to Calgary.

lands, this region displays a picturesque archipelago, often painted and considered by artists to be one of the most splendid landscapes in the world. Visit Lake Orta and cruise on enchanting Lake Como, Europe’s deepest lake. See beautiful Bellagio with its tropical ambience and the impressive 17th-century villas of Tremezzo. Delight in a full-day excursion to cosmopolitan Milan.

Charlemagne’s Dream – Main-Danube Canal and Danube River Cruise An Alumni College program September 2-10 Alumni Holidays International From: $2,245, plus air & V.A.T. taxes

Cruise the British Isles June 30 – July 11 Alumni Holidays International From: $3,195, plus air & V.A.T. taxes Cruise the British Isles aboard the luxurious Minerva II, and gain a new appreciation for the beauty and majesty of these enchanted lands. This journey begins in stately Edinburgh with its imposing castle, before heading on to one of Scotland’s most cultured and dynamic cities, Glasgow. Sail into Belfast, the capital of Northern Ireland, and experience its legacy of industry and political struggles and then head south to charming Dublin, which welcomes all with open arms. Continue to sail around the tip of Cornwall to the historic port town of Falmouth and one of England’s most colorful maritime towns, Dartmouth. Visit the wind-swept Isle of Portland whose white limestone quarries have provided materials to St. Paul’s Cathedral and the UN headquarters in New York. Continue on to the bustling port of Dover, famous for its dramatic white chalk cliffs before transferring to London. Poland - Krakow An Alumni College program July 27 – August 4 Alumni Holidays International From: $1,845, plus air & V.A.T. taxes With its soaring towers, fortified castles, and splendid old houses, Krakow is the spiritual capital of Poland. Krakow’s abundance of well-preserved historic buildings, miraculously spared the destruction of both World War I and II, has earned it the status of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Journey to Czestochowa and view the famous Black Madonna, the most treasured religious icon in all of Poland. Gaze at the magnificent Tatra Mountains from picturesque Zakopane, future site of the 2006 Winter Olympics. Make a sobering pilgrimage to infamous Auschwitz or explore the breathtaking Dunajec

Valley on a rafting trip, and delve into Malopolska, the country’s most picturesque and varied region and walk the noble streets. Village Life in the Alps August 5-13 Gohagan & Company From: $1,995, plus air Enjoy the unrivaled charm and stunning natural beauty of the Austrian, German, and Italian Alps on this new and exclusive program. While staying amidst a magnificent alpine setting at a four-star, family-owned traditional Tyrolean hotel in the quaint town of Igls, experience the region’s fascinating history and rich culture with visits to such landmarks as Mozart’s birthplace at Salzburg and Ludwig II’s fairy-tale Neuschwanstein Castle in Füssen, Germany. Also, see the mysterious 5,300-year-old “Iceman” ice mummy, visit a working farm and gain understanding and enjoyment of the region by attending special cultural presentations and a village forum discussion with local residents. The Danube & the Habsburg Empire August 20-29 Gohagan & Company From: $2,395, plus air From the spires of Prague and the castles of Krakow to the palaces and cathedrals of Vienna, explore the legendary landmarks of the Habsburg Empire and Central Europe on this exclusive new luxury travel program. While visiting the magnificent cities of Prague, Vienna, Budapest, and Krakow, as well as the historic castles and natural beauty of the Wachau Valley, enjoy accommodations at Europe’s finest hotels and aboard the deluxe M.S. Amadeus Classic. In addition, travel between Krakow and Budapest will be made aboard the elegant Majestic Imperator, a faithfully restored reproduction of Emperor Franz Joseph II’s personal railroad car. Throughout the program, expert guides will lead the excursions

Web site at www.msualum.com or call (888) 697-2863

and tours of central Europe’s most famous palaces, castles, cathedrals and museums. Odyssey to Oxford August 27-September 10, 2005 MSUAA Lifelong Education From: $3,245 plus air Located in the heart of England, Oxford’s historic setting will charm you during your two weeks of lifelong learning. This outstanding lifelong education opportunity takes you on a rare adventure to Oxford—“city of dreaming spires” and to the University of Oxford, famous as a great center of learning since the 12th century. Once England’s capital, Oxford is located in the heart of England just 50 miles northwest of London. Explore topics such as British archaeology, art, history, theatre, or literature with Oxford tutors. Field trips include theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon, visits to historic sites, and other optional excursions. Call 517-355-4562 for a brochure. The Canadian Rockies August 12-20 Intrav From: $2,995, plus air This exciting nine-day adventure of the Canadian Rockies is an excellent occasion for learning and discovery. See Chinatown, the brick-paved roads of Gastown, Robson Street, and Stanley Park. Travel through towering peaks and fertile fields aboard the Rocky Mountaineer train en route to Kamloops, for a pleasant overnight stay. Continue by train to Alberta’s Jasper, the largest national park in the Rockies. Delight in one of the most spectacular drives of North America, following the Icefields Parkway to lovely Lake Louise, Bannff National Park’s premier attraction. A visit to Yoho National Park highlights such sites as historic railroads, spiral mountainside tunnels, and steep rock faces where goats roam. Explore Banff, the unques-

Once upon a time, Charlemagne dreamed of connecting the waterways of Europe into one vast thoroughfare from the North Sea to the Black Sea. The Main-Danube Canal, one of the most impressive engineering feats of all time, was the realization of this dream and, since September 25, 1992, has linked an enchanting world of fairytale castles and cities steeped in tradition. On this exciting journey through the heartland of the Bavarian Alps and the breathtaking Wachau Valley, marvel at spectacular natural beauty, well-preserved medieval charm and architectural splendor. Traverse the Main-Danube Canal and the Danube River aboard the elegant M/S Swiss Pearl. Explore historic Nuremberg, regal Regensburg, picturesque Passau, the Wachauer towns of Linz, amazing Melk and Dürnstein and of course classic Vienna. Great Lakes Cruise September 2-12 Gohagan & Company From: $2,795, plus air From world-class cities like Toronto and Chicago to the quaint streets of Mackinac Island and stunning beauty of the Michigan and Minnesota shores, experience the rich history and natural treasures of North America’s Great Lakes on this exciting new 10night cruise program. While sailing to such fascinating historic sites as Sault Sainte Marie, Ontario and taking in the beautiful coastal scenery of settings like Gooseberry Falls State Park, enjoy deluxe accommodations, expertly prepared American cuisine, and the highest levels of personal service aboard the M.S. Columbus. A special, optional pre-cruise program in Toronto that includes a city tour and two nights at the landmark Fairmont Hotel is available. Civilizations of the Western Mediterranean September 18-30 Gohagan & Company From: $3,995, plus air For eleven days, experience the rich history, colorful traditions and oldworld charms of the Western Mediterranean on this exciting new cruise itinerary aboard the deluxe

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M.S. Le Diamant. Begin in Portugal’s historic capital of Lisbon and continue on to the medieval quarters of Cadiz, the Moorish delights of Malaga and the architectural beauty of Barcelona, including the magnificent Picasso Museum. Enjoy the legendary coastal cities of Ste and Cannes on the French Riviera, before concluding with the jewels of Italy’s western coast, to explore the legendary landmarks of Florence, Pisa and Pompeii. A very special two-day pre-tour in Lisbon and/or a two-day post-tour in Rome that includes private visits to the Sistine Chapel and the Vatican Museum are available. Treasures of China September 23-October 10 Alumni Holidays International From: $5,595 from Los Angeles Experience the magic that has drawn travelers to the mysterious East for centuries. Begin this journey in fascinating Beijing to visit Tiananmen Square, the Forbidden City and the Temple of Heaven. Also see the Ming Tombs and the amazing expanse of the Great Wall. Journey on to explore Xi’an, home of the remarkable Terra Cotta Warriors. From Chongqing, visit remote Dazu and the 50,000 brilliantly painted Buddhist stone carvings discovered there. Aboard the elegant M/V Yangtze President, cruise the incomparable Yangtze River and marvel at the magnificent Three Gorges. Stroll along the famous Bund in Shanghai and conclude this Asian odyssey amid the bustling excitement of Hong Kong—a shopper’s paradise. America’s Last Coast September 27-October 4 Clipper Cruise Line From: $1,760, plus air Explore the magnificent Pacific Northwest – a destination that ap-

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peals to artists, photographers, nature lovers, and all those with a spirit of adventure in their souls abord the 138 passenger Yorktown Clipper. Sail among the delightful small islands of the San Juan Archipelago and experience Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, tiny Sucia, and the wildlife refuge of Matia. Watch for orcas and the many species of birds that inhabit this area. Visit the famous Butchart Gardens in Victoria and enjoy a day exploring Vancouver. The intimate Yorktown Clipper navigates easily through the Strait of Georgia providing an up-close perspective of the attributes that give this region its unique character and charm. Wateways of France An Alumni College program October 7-15 Alumni Holidays International From: $2,245, plus air & V.A.T. taxes Sail into the heart of France on this unforgettable journey aboard the M/S Anacoluthe and enjoy the sights and sounds of timeless Paris. Stroll the streets of Auvers-sur-Oise, the small village that was a magnet to artists such as Pissaro, Cézanne and Van Gogh. Delve into the history of Ile de France, the political axis of the country since before the days of Louis XIV. Marvel at the splendid halls and gardens of Vaux le Vicomte and Fontainebleau and gain a deeper understanding of the forces of monarchy and revolution. See the peaceful glades of Barbizon that inspired and transformed landscape painting. Visit Monet’s beloved gardens at Giverny; tour the ancient town of Sens with its glorious Gothic cathedral; and sample the wares at Chablis, one of the most famous wine villages on earth. The Hudson Valley Wine Cruise October 12-19 Clipper Cruise Line From: $2,170, plus air Experience the spectacular Hudson Valley wine country on this unique cruise aboard the 102-passenger Nantucket Clipper. Local experts will enhance the voyage with presentations and informal talks on the region’s delectable cuisine and wine while enjoying the comfort and convenience of the floating “country inn.” Along the way, enjoy winery visits and tastings at the region’s premier establishments. Additional highlights include lunch with a cooking demonstration at The Culinary Institute of America, and a visit to the Hudson Valley produce farms and markets.

Polar Bear Watch October 15-20 Natural Habitat Adventures From: $3,295, plus air See the illustrious polar bear up close and personal on this trip to the icy tundra of Churchill, Manitoba. Churchill, located on Hudson Bay in Western Canada, serves as base camp for this exciting adventure. View the bears and other wildlife from tundra vehicles during two all-day outings where wildlife activity is well documented. Natural Habitat’s professional staff is known for its memorable wildlife adventures and takes seriously its responsibility to protect and preserve the fascinating creatures and habitats. An optional helicopter excursion to view the tundra and the bears is available to enjoy. Saxony Cruise on the Magnificent Elbe River An Alumni College program October 20-29 Alumni Holidays International From: $2,445, plus air & V.A.T. taxes Berlin provides the perfect start for a land-and-river journey into one of Europe’s most majestic and historic regions. Explore this vibrant, haunting city, with its echoes of kings, conquerors, tyrants, and statesmen, before embarking on a cruise down the mighty Elbe River. From your base aboard the inviting M/S Saxonia, visit some of the most picturesque and historically significant cities in Germany’s Brandenburg and Saxony provinces, including Potsdam—effectively the birthplace of modern Germany—and Wittenberg, the epicenter of the Protestant Reformation. Experience the exquisite beauty of Dresden and the charm of Meissen, home of European porcelain making. Sail through enchanting mountains amid some of the country’s most breathtaking scenery. This adventure ends in magnificent Prague, the jewel of Eastern Europe that has remained virtually unchanged for centuries.

adventurers aboard the 70-passenger Sea Lion. Zodiac and kayak boats will be used to transport passengers to the deepest areas of the rivers and a historian who is an expert on the voyage of Lewis and Clark will also accompany the group throughout the program. Note: Passengers must arrange airline reservations with their local travel agent. Sicily – The Cultural Season An Alumni College program November 26-December 5 Alumni Holidays International From: $1,845, plus air & V.A.T. taxes Cradled in a wide bay, Sicily’s bustling capital, Palermo, is an extraordinary cultural crossroads and a living reflection of its rich history. Following in the footsteps of the Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, and Byzantines who once controlled Sicily, the Arabs came into rule and Palermo became a multicultural metropolis and the world’s second largest city. Explore the island’s cultural riches from the ancient archeological site of the Valley of Temples, to the Allied landing beaches; from medieval Cefalù to charming Corleone; and from beautiful Bagheria to the magnificent mosaics of Monreale. Dive into Sicilian culture and tradition with a hand’s-on lesson in ceramics, antiques restoration, or cooking.

In the Wake of Lewis & Clark October 28 – November 3 Lindblad Expeditions From: $1,795, plus air Back for it’s third season, the journey of the Lewis & Clark expedition is available once again to mark the Bicentennial anniversary of the famous expedition across America. Sail the Columbia and Snake rivers and marvel at Hells Canyon, the Columbia River Gorge, Fort Clatsop, Bonneville Dam and the Columbia River Maritime Museum. Retrace the steps of two of the most famous American

MSU Alumni Association Travel Programs MSU Union, East Lansing, MI 48824-1029 (517) 355-8314 (888) 697-2863 (517) 355-5265 - fax Email- [email protected] Website - www.msualum.com

Web site at www.msualum.com or call (888) 697-2863

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SPORTS IZZO CONTINUES QUEST FOR CHAMPIONSHIPS By Robert Bao At last, Izzo will be able to field players in their natural positions, rather than have to adjust for unforeseen departures. Tom Izzo is quietly optimistic going into his 10th season as MSU head coach. The reason? “This year,” he believes, “we can put round pegs in round holes, and square pegs in square holes.” Unexpected player departures had forced some players out of position the past couple of seasons, a situation made worse by Izzo’s nails-tough scheduling. The results—two early NCAA departures and just one Elite Eight appearance—might be deemed good by some programs, but not MSU, where success is now measured by trophy hardware (combined with an 80 percent graduation rate). The 2004-2005 MSU team boasts a good mix of experience and youth and the luxury of not having to force square pegs into round holes. And although a gauntlet of foes like Duke, Stanford, and UCLA still lurk, at least they are not bunched like last season, when, Izzo notes, “they came one right after the other.” MSU will be led by seniors Alan Anderson, Tim Bograkos, Chris Hill, and Kelvin Torbert, a group that Izzo describes as “unfairly maligned, even by me.” “They will go down as one of the best classes academically ever,” says Izzo. “I hope they can find a way to win a championship. Our program is at a point where we’re measured by that.” Last season, they came within a couple of free throws from winning MSU’s fifth Big Ten championship in seven years. “How PAGE 44

(Clockwise from left) Izzo looks forward to seeing Paul Davis and Chris Hill lead the team, as well as newcomers Drew Neitzel and Marquise Gray.

I’ll judge these seniors is how they bounced back after having been rocked, socked and rolled over, with all those early losses on national TV,” says Izzo. “I’ll use this as a reminder.” The year before, despite not having a pure point guard, they

advanced to the NCAA’s Elite Eight, beating Colorado, Florida at Florida, and Maryland, before succumbing to Texas in Texas. And as freshmen, they had to put in 30-plus minutes of playing time as MSU had dwindled to seven scholarship players. FALL 2004

Helping them will be junior forward Paul Davis, who has bulked up to 265 pounds and, Izzo says, “has been very, very focused, working every day on his game and acquiring a love for the game.” Junior Maurice Ager and sophomore Shannon Brown, MSUALUMNIMAGAZINE

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“We need to keep coming at people and wear them down. That’s what we did in our national championship year.” two athletic perimeter players, have “looked great” in individual workouts. Power forward Delco Rowley was a strong rebounder for the Big Ten team that traveled to Europe in the summer. Sophomore center Drew Naymick endured a shoulder injury over the summer, but Izzo

RESPECT FOR MSU WOMEN CAGERS By Robert Bao Big Ten women’s basketball coaches picked MSU to finish second in the league, showing great respect for Joanne McCallie’s emerging program. They also picked junior sharpshooter Lindsay Bowen to the pre-season All-Big Ten team. Last season, MSU went 22-9 and advanced to the second round of the NCAA tournament. The Spartans were 10-6 and tied for fourth in the Big Ten. Guard Bowen notched 66 treys while leading the team with 13.5 points and 2.4 assists per game. Other key players for MSU include senior point guard Kristin Haynie, senior center Kelli Roehrig, junior forward Liz Shimek, and sophomore guard

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expects him and Rowley to play significant roles on defense. “We need someone to set picks, defend, rebound and just bang,” says Izzo. “That might be a role for Naymick and Delco. The strengths of this program have been defense and rebounding, and we need to improve in these areas. Ironically, we were last on defense statistically but led in four offensive categories—field goal percentage, free throw percentage, three-point percentage and scoring. It was the first time in Big Ten history a team led in all four offensive categories.” Incoming freshman Marquise Walker, an above-the-rim type inside player, is also expected to help immediately, as is fellow freshman Drew Neitzel, a nifty ball-handler who, says Izzo, “can see the court with the back of his head.”

“We definitely have enough good players this year (to win titles),” says Izzo. “The keys are finding a running mate for Davis, stabilizing our comfort zone at point guard, and staying injury-free. “We have some depth to where maybe we can run every time and wear opponents down. We need to keep coming at people. That’s what we did in our national championship year. We rotated and kept coming at people and nobody cared who started.” Tom and his assistants, Doug Wocjik, Mark Montgomery and Dwayne Stephens, have their work cut out. The Big Ten is going through yet another cyclical rise in strength. “The Big Ten will be way up from last year,” predicts Izzo. “Your have four teams that everyone will pick in the Top

Victoria Lucas-Perry. MSU alumni will have an opportunity to see MSU’s high octane team, since three of MSU games this season will be broadcast by FSN Chicago and others could be on ESPN or ESPN2. McCallie herself received some kudos in being named to the New England Basketball Hall of Fame. A native of Maine, she enjoyed eight successful seasons as head basketball coach for the University of Maine, going 16773 with six straight NCAA appearances. Assistant coach Ann Marie Gilbert, former Oberlin standout, returns for her third season at MSU. Debuting as assistants are Al Brown, who won three national championships while an assistant at Tennessee from 1996-98, and Semeka Randall, a former Tennessee All-American and WNBA player with the San

Antonio Silver Stars. Both Brown and Randall were part of Tennessee’s 1998 national championship team that went 39-0; Randall started as a freshman, averaged 15.9 points, and earned All-American recognition.

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25—Illinois, MSU, Wisconsin and Michigan. Iowa and Indiana have a chance. Northwestern will have its best team ever. And you can never count out a Purdue team coached by Gene Keady. Minnesota, Ohio State and Penn State are question marks because there are some unknowns there. “A couple of teams have a legitimate chance to make the Final Four.” Obviously, Izzo believes MSU will be in the mix. “My job is to put us in position to win championships,” he explains. “And in the past seven seasons, we’ve had a mathematical chance to win the Big Ten coming into the last week (of regular season play).“ Expect the knocking on the door to get louder in 20042005.

Coach Joanne “Coach P” McCallie gives instructions to Lindsay Brown, who was selected to the preseason All-Big Ten team. PAGE 45

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The emergence of Drew Stanton at quarterback has solidified MSU’s offense.

2004 FOOTBALL TEAM AIMS TO IMPROVE By Robert Bao At mid-season, yet to face the toughest part of its schedule, the MSU football team stood at 3-3 and was just finding its stride and identity. The key for John L. Smith, who won eight games and Big Ten “Coach of the Year” honors in his debut last year, was finding a quarterback to fill the shoes of Jeff Smoker, who now plays for the NFL’s St. Louis Rams. Sophomore quarterback Drew Stanton, his knee injury from the Alamo Bowl still lingering, took over the reigns in the second half of the Notre Dame game and proved he could move the chains, providing both leadership and an uncanny running ability that one coach affectionately calls “Coyote ugly.” The emergence of Stanton dramatically improved MSU’s attack. By mid-season MSU fielded the most balanced offense in the PAGE 46

Big Ten with 194.3 rushing yards and 214.8 passing yards per game. To the astonishment of some in the media who did not think a spread offense could generate many running yards, MSU ranked second in rushing in the Big Ten. “It was a point of emphasis for us this year to do that,” explains Smith, not at all surprised by the statistics. “It’s a credit to the offensive front, they’re doing a better job, and I think our running backs are doing a better job as well. “And then we’ve got a punk playing quarterback who’s running the ball OK too.” By midseason it became clear that Stanton, coyote ugly or not, had began to give MSU an offensive identity, if not a swagger. Previously, MSU had tried senior quarterback Damon Dowdell for the opener at Rutgers and freshman Stephen Reaves for the next game and a half. MSU’s 19-14 loss at Rutgers was a lackluster effort that exposed the Spartans’ youth, inexperience and lack of depth. MSU’s one experienced unit, the wide receivers, exhibited butterfingers. At game’s end, however, Dowdell missed some opportunities to make the winning play. Reaves took over at the home opener against Central Michi-

gan and completed 9 for 19 for 183 yards as MSU won 24-7. He threw some beautiful passes, including a 44-yard touchdown spiral to junior captain Kyle Brown. But his inexperience caught up with him in the night game against Notre Dame, a team MSU had beaten in six of the last seven games. Reaves threw three interceptions in the first half enroute to a 31-24 loss. In the second half, Stanton led MSU to its only offensive touchdown (the others came from a blocked punt and a kickoff return by DeAndra Cobb). Stanton finally earned the start at Indiana, and led MSU in a roaring second-half comeback for a 30-20 win after trailing 207 at the half. Stanton ran for 134 yards and two touchdowns and passed for 172 yards. More importantly, he showed leadership in rallying the Spartans back from its deficit. He had great help from the defense. Keyed by safeties Eric Smith and Jason Harmon, MSU shut down the Hoosiers completely.

“We’ve got a punk playing quarterback who’s running the ball OK.” The following week, however, the Spartans ran into a Hawkeye buzzsaw at Iowa and lost 38-16. Stanton engineered four long drives, but MSU could not quite finish, settling for field goals instead of touchdowns. Two apparent MSU touchdown passes were ruled out of bounds. Despite its sloppiness with bobbled passes and missed tackles, MSU still amassed 449 yards and FALL 2004

seemed on the verge of becoming a yard-churning machine on offense. Sure enough, MSU scored its highest offensive output of the season with a 38-25 home win over Illinois. MSU did not commit a turnover and had just two penalties for 20 yards. The offensive line—led by center Chris Morris, tackles Gordon Niebylski and Sean Poole, and guards Kyle Cook and William Whitticker—proved surprisingly productive, boosting MSU to second in the Big Ten not only in rushing but also in sacks allowed (just 5 in 6 games). Stanton completed 22 passes to 10 different receivers, and himself caught a touchdown pass from wide receiver Jerramy Scott. At game’s end, redshirt freshman running back Jehuu Caulcrick was able to chew up yardage while running the clock down, something that pleased John L. Smith. Could MSU sustain its emerging offensive prowess and personality in the second half of the season? Could MSU’s defense play up to preseason expectations, even with its key injuries? These questions remained to be answered. However, MSU was clearly beginning to jell on offense and also establishing a reputation as a team that gets stronger as the game unfolds. MSU was outscored 31-14 in the first quarter, 33-23 in the second, 34-24 in the third, but owned a whopping 47-17 edge in the final period. In an instant poll at the MSU Alumni Association web site (msualum.com), most respondents believed that John L. Smith was the right leader for the MSU football program. In his first full recruiting season, he mustered a Top 20 recruiting class, and the young team was clearly making improvements in his areas of emphases. MSUALUMNIMAGAZINE

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MSU ICERS IN 2004-2005 After finishing within three points of the CCHA title a year ago, MSU icers begin the 200405 season hungry for another championship try. The pieces are there . . . offensive point production, defense and goaltending. Rick Comley, in his third year as head coach, returns 21 letterwinners, including 12 forwards, six defensemen and three goaltenders to their rotation. MSU

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Jim Slater, MSU’s leading scorer with 48 points, is expected to lead MSU’s offensive charge. also welcomes seven newcomers (five forwards, two defensemen) to a line-up that went 23-17-2 overall, took third in the CCHA and made the NCAAs. Last season MSU finished 15th in the nation on offense, averaging 3.24 goals per game, with 87.5 percent of its scoring production returning. Up front,

senior forward Jim Slater, a 2004 All-America Second-Team selection, a Hobey Baker finalist and an All-CCHA First-Team honoree, leads the charge. He tallied a team-best 48 points (19 goals, 29 assists) one year ago to tie for the CCHA overall scoring race. “There is no question in my mind that we will have the ability to score goals this season,” says Comley. “We just need to find a way to be more creative on offense and find a second line that can score on a consistent basis to take some of the pressure off Jim Slater’s line.” MSU also returns senior forward Mike Lalonde and sophomore forward Tommy Goebel, Nos. 2 and 3 in scoring last year. Lalonde tallied a career-best 40 points, including a team-high 22 goals. Meanwhile, Goebel tallied 15 goals and 17 assists for 32 points while making league Honorable Mention in his rookie campaign. Defense should be solid this season with the return of six letterwinners that allowed just 2.5 goals per game one year ago. Sophomore A.J. Thelen leads the returnees after finishing fourth on the squad in scoring

with 29 points (11 goals, 18 assists) and being named the CCHA’s Best Offensive Defenseman. Other returnees include assistant captain Jared Nightingale, Corey Potter, Ethan Graham, Chris Snavely and Brandon Warner. Unlike last year’s squad which featured five rookie blueliners, State’s roster shows just two newcomers in Jeff Dunne of the Chicago Steel and Daniel Vukovic of St. Michael’s Buzzers of Ontario. MSU also returns all three netminders in sophomore Dominic Vicari, senior Matt Migliaccio and junior Rod Tocco. “Defensively, we are in a very good situation with the return of six blueliners and goaltenders Dominic Vicari (2.31 GAA) and Matt Migliaccio (2.70 GAA),” remarked Comley. “It is an area that we need to continually improve upon if we are going to contend for championships.” “The CCHA will be very competitive from top to bottom,” remarked Comley. “It is going to make for a very interesting league race.” —Becky Olsen, MSU sports information director.

FOR THE RECORD WE’RE NUMBER ONE!—In mid-September, MSU’s field hockey team was 7-0 and ranked No. 1 in the nation in the STX/NFHCA coaches poll. The undefeated Spartans have scored five or more goals in all but two contests, while holding opponents to no more than two goals per game. Spartan junior goaltender Christina Kirkaldy has already posted two shutouts in 2004, marking 13 in her career. Said MSU head coach Michele Madison, “This is a CLICK RIGHT THROUGH FOR MSU

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credit, first and foremost, to the players and their ongoing commitment to do their very best every day because that is their primary goal. It is also a credit to the staff and to everyone who has ever played for MSU, everyone who has ever worked for it. I am just so proud to be a part of this team.” MSU boasts its most prominent winning streak since 1975, when the Spartans enjoyed an 8-0 streak.

Christopher Smith

GOLF IS CORE-IGIBLE—A frustrating game, golf can be more easily mastered by following the advice of John Dal Corobbo, director of golf instruction at MSU’s Forest Akers Golf Courses and one of America’s top teachers according to Golf Magazine. In his new book, Model Golf–The Nine Core Skills to an Enlightened Golf Game, he focuses on core basics while eliminating the kind of extraneous information that fill up golf magazines. Dal Corobbo takes the reader step by step through each of the nine core skills of golf with clear descriptions, diagrams and photographs. A former Nike Tour member and a seven-time qualifier for the National PGA Club Professional Championship, Dal Corobbo was the 2002 Michigan PGA Player of the Year. Model Golf is available at both Forest Akers Golf Courses for $20.00 (call 517-355-1635). The book was produced and published by the MSU Division of Housing & Food Services Marketing Communications Dept. PAGE 48

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OLYMPIC STADIUM TURF—The grass used at Olympic Stadium during the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens in late August was created and perfected by MSU turfgrass experts. In the photo below, taken on Aug. 17, three days before the start of competition, workmen are laying final modules of grass to create a field that mirrors the modular field in Spartan Stadium. SPARTAN OLYMPIAN DECATHLETE—Former MSU All-American track star Paul A. Terek, ’02, competed in the decathlon in Athens, Greece, as a member of the 2004 U.S. Olympic Track and Field team. Although he did not medal, Terek will use that experience to launch his medal bid in the 2008 Games in Beijing, China, as he demonstrates in this photo taken after the closing ceremony on Aug. 29. At the July trials in Sacramento, CA, Terek won the third and final spot on the U.S. decathlon unit by just a couple of seconds in the 1,500-meter event, the last of ten grueling events in two days. In previous Summer

Games, basketball star Steve MSU Archives & Historical Collections Smith competed in Sydney in 2000, while diver Julie FarrellOvenhouse competed in Barcelona in 1992. MEMOIRS FROM MISS BASKETBALL—Julie (Polakowski) Swanson, ’87, the state of Michigan’s first “Miss Basketball” and a star player for MSU in the early 1980s, has authored a novel for youngsters, Going For The Record (Eerdmans Books Publishing Co., 2004). The book, featuring a female star athlete in Leenalau County, is essentially a roman à clef. As a high school senior in Leland, Swanson led her team to the state title and scored 812 points in 28 games, setting a single season scoring mark. Even today, the mark is in second place alltime. At MSU, Julie made Big Ten Honorable Mention in 1985. Swanson is currently a mother of three in Charlottesville, VA. Her husband Steve, ’85, former MSU soccer player, is the women’s soccer coach at the University of Virginia. MSU BRAINASTS— With a team GPA of 3.31, the MSU gymnastics team ranks among the top

schools in the nation both athletically and academically. Six Spartan gymnasts were named to the 2004 NACGC/W AllAmerica Team for earning a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Junior Anna Hunsinger and sophomore Victoria Iakounina both posted a 3.87 GPA to lead the team academically. Senior Lindsey Voth ranked third with a 3.81. Junior Lauren Simpson posted a 3.78, while sophomore Jenna Rivers earned a 3.64 and junior Jaime Miles posts a 3.62. The women gymnasts have enjoyed academic success for several years, posting a team GPA of at least 3.0 since 2002 and earning a 3.3 or higher as a team the past two years. THE ICEMEN COMPETETH — Two former Spartan icers, forward Bryan Smolinski and defenseman John-Michael Liles, made the 2004 U.S. World Cup Hockey Team that opened competition Aug. 31 in Montreal, Canada. Liles enjoyed an excellent rookie season with the NHL’s Colorado Avalanche. Smolinski, a veteran who has played with Boston, Pittsburgh, New York Islanders, Los Angeles and Ottawa, previously was a member of Team USA’s gold medal squad at the 1996 World Cup of Hockey.

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PERFECT GIFTS FOR SPARTANS OF ALL AGES Buy this chair and many other great gifts at SpartyShop.com

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A L U M N I

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ALMAMATTERS COASTAL GEORGIA—Jun. 26: More than two dozen area Spartans attended the Club Charter Presentation at the Moon River Brewing Co., Savannah, GA. A silent auction raised $170 for the club. DALLAS/FORT WORTH, TX—Jun. 12: More than 70 area Spartans attended the Fifth Annual Golf Tournament and Scholarship Drive at the Riverchase Golf Club, Coppell, TX. A raffle of merchandise autographed by Tom Izzo, John L. Smith and Dallas Cowboy Flozell Adams helped raise $2,600 for the club’s scholarship fund, which now well exceeds $10,000. The event has been organized by Patrick Johnson all five years.

REGIONAL CLUBS BERRIEN COUNTY—Jun 15: This child relaxing in the arms of Sparty was one of 550 area Spartans who attended the 18th Annual Steak ‘n’ Suds Outing at Sportsman’s Park, St. Joseph. Special guests included MSU athletic director Ron Mason, assistant hockey coach Tom Newton, and women’s golf coach Stacy Slobodnik. The event was chaired by Larry Smith and Judy Soelle. BLUEWATER CLUB—Jul. 21: About a dozen area alumni attended a dinner for 2004 Jim Reilly Memorial Scholarship recipient Jenna Gray (center, with PAGE 50

her parents Diane and William) at the Thomas Edison Inn, Port Huron.

and Jane Loper in Jamestown, OH. About $250 was raised for the club’s scholarship fund. EASTERN VIRGINIA—Apr. 24: About 30 area Spartans attended the Annual Dinner and Meeting in Williamsburg, VA. Special guests included Pamela Horne, MSU director of admissions and scholarships. About $100 was raised for the club’s student scholarship fund.

DAYTON, OH—Jul. 17: Area Spartans participated in the Big Ten Night at the Dayton Dragons. Aug. 14: Some two dozen area Spartans (see photo) attended the fourth annual summer picnic at the lakefront home of Joe

GRAND TRAVERSE—Jul. 10: Sparty, seen here with this year’s National Cherry Queen, was among the 10,000 participants at the Grand Royale Parade of the National Cherry Festival in Traverse City. For the 12th straight year, the club boasted a parade entry—a chariot pulled by miniature horse—that was followed by MSU cheerleaders, a 20-member

FALL 2004

MSU ALUMNI MAGAZINE

CHICAGO—Aug.1: More than 115 Spartans gathered at Shoreline Parks in Evanston to welcome incoming area freshman. Jim Higgins served as cook, while club president Dave LaPorte introduced the MSU Fight Song to the new Spartans.

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Spartan alumni band, and two of the club’s 2004 scholarship winners.

HILLSDALE COUNTY—May 22: Some 60 area Spartans attended the Annual Dinner Event at the Hillsdale Golf and Country Club. Charlie Holton was honored as the “Spartan of the Year.” Special guests included Barbara Ball-McClure of University Development. JACKSON—Jun. 18: Some 164 area Spartans participated in the Fourth Annual Golf Outing and Scholarship Fundraiser at the Hankerd Hills Golf Resort, Pleasant Lake. Guest speaker was assistant football coach Jeff Stoutland. Special guests included Bob Knickerbocker, MSU athletic equipment manager, and MSUAA assistant directors Dave Brown and Robert Bao. About $3,000 was raised for the club’s student scholarship fund. KALAMAZOO COUNTY—Jun. 1: Some 300 area Spartans attended the 32nd Annual Summer Picnic at MSU’s Brook Lodge Hotel and Conference Center, Augusta. Special guests included MSU trustee Dee Cook, president emeritus Gordon Guyer, trustee emeritus Russ Mawby, football coach John L. Smith, music school director James Forger, and associate head women’s basketball coach Janelle Grimm-Burgess. Altogether $4,475 was raised for the Ralph Young Fund, the School of Music, and the Student Alumni Foundation.

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METRO WASHINGTON, DC— The club needs 350 area Spartans to purchase an MSU affinity plate issued by the State of Virginia (minimun state requirement). Interested alums can visit www.dmv.state.va.us/webdoc/pd f/vsa61.pdf and download the license plate application form, and send the completed application and a $25 check (payable to MSU Alumni Association of Metro DC) to Michael Cieslak, 221 N. George Mason Dr. #1, Arlington VA 22203. Meanwhile, the club’s softball team went 7-7 for the season, finishing with four straight wins, including a 20-0 whipping of Florida.

MUSKEGON—Jun. 29: Nearly 180 area Spartans took part in the 14th Annual Don Arnson Golf Outing at the Oakridge Golf Course in Muskegon. Special guests included basketball coach Tom Izzo (middle), assistant football coach Steve Stripling, and Chuck Streeter of the Ralph Young Fund. A total of $21,589 was raised for the club’s scholarship fund. Three $2,000 grants and three $500 book grants were awarded to MSU students from the area.

area Spartans in Thousand Oaks for dinner and theater. Jan. 31: Area alumni gathered at The Wine Thieves in Lafayette for a wine tasting event. ROCHESTER, NY—May 11: Some 40 area Spartans attended the bi-annual Spring Dinner and Raffle Fundraiser Kickoff at the Locust Hill Country Club in Rochester. Guest speaker was Chuck Webb (left), vice president for university development. (bottom of page)

SACRAMENTO VALLEY, CA— May 13: Nearly 100 area Spartans attended a baseball game of the Sacramento Valley Rivercats at Raley Field, West Sacramento.

SCOTTSDALE, AZ—May 1: Scott and Brooke Essex hosted a luncheon for area Spartans to meet MSU President-Designate Lou Anna K. Simon at their home in Dave Brown Tempe, AZ.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN—Jul. 2: About 40 area Spartans and 40 Wolverines teamed up to see some fireworks as the Detroit Tigers took on the Colorado Rockies at Coor’s Field, Denver, CO.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA—Jan. 24: MSU President-Designate Lou Anna K. Simon met with 36

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CONSTITUENT ASSOCIATIONS HUMAN ECOLOGY—Jun. 10: MSU President-Designate Lou Anna K. Simon (middle) and acting dean William Abbett (2nd from R) were among those attending the HECAA’s afternoon tea at the home of associate dean Won O. Song. The event served to update alumni on the college’s reorganization.

bial Ecology (whose contingent is in the photo). MSU Professor James Tiedje was congratulated for having been elected the new president of ASM. NURSING—Jun. 23: Some 55 alumni and friends joined dean Marilyn Rothert at the Lansing Area Alumni Garden Party in the Life Sciences Building. Tours were given of the Janice Thompson Granger Learning Labs and the MSU Demonstration Gardens.

INTERNATIONAL CLUBS TUCSON, AZ—May 1: Bob and Kathy Workman hosted a reception for MSU President-Designate Lou Anna K. Simon at their home. WEST MICHIGAN—July 12: About 350 Spartans attended the MSU Alumni Club of West Michigan’s 6th Annual Steve Smith Charity Challenge at Egypt Valley Country Club in Grand Rapids. Smith was honored for his role as honorary chair of the Sparty Project and for all he’s done for MSU. Special guests included Jud Heathcote (inset), Ron Mason, George Per-

les, Gus Ganakas and Steve’s teammates from the 1990 Big 10 Championship team (see photo), including Mike Peplowski and Matt Steigenga. The event raised $60,000 for MSU, the Steve Smith Detroit Pershing MSU Scholarship, and the Grand Rapids Public Schools Student Advancement Foundation. WESTERN NEW YORK—Aug. 3: Some 50 area Spartans, including students and parents, attended a pizza send-off event on Grand Island for students bound for MSU. Each student received a $50 gift certificate for textbooks.

LABOR & INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS— Nov. 6: Nearly two dozen area Spartans attended an alumni reception at the Seyfarth Shaw Law Firm in Chicago. May 11: About 70 alumni and friends attended an alumni reception at the James B. Henry Center for Executive Development. Special guests included Marietta Baba, dean of the College of Social Science, and speakers Rich Block and Keith Groty. NATURAL SCIENCE—May 25: More than 120 alumni attended a reception at the New Orleans Marriott during the American Society of Microbiology’s General Photo courtesy of Doug Moffat Meeting. The reception was hosted by the CNSAA, the Dept. of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics, and the Center for Micro

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FALL 2004

BEIJING, CHINA—May 31: The MSU Alumni Club of Beijing, China, met at the Jinglun Hotel to welcome Ron Rosenberg, MSU’s associate dean of engineering. The banquet was organized by Dr. Yi Zhang, Ph. D. ’02, assistant professor of finance at Peking University.

SRI LANKA—Jun. 17: Members of the local alumni club met at Han Gook Gwan Korean Restaurant in Havelock Place, Colombo. Special guests from the U.S. included Dr. Chitra Gunawardena, Dr. P. Kaviratna and his wife, Dr. Hema Kaviratna, from Georgia. The dinner event was organized by Dr. Sunethra Karunaratne of the University of Peradeniya. MSU ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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Kurt Stepnitz/University Relations

SPARTAN SPIRIT 2004—Sparty made his presence felt at this year’s Spartan Spirit event at Spartan Stadium, the largest gathering on campus for new students every fall. Sponsored by the MSU Alumni Association and the Student Alumni Foundation, the event drew upwards of 15,000 students and community members this fall. They learned the MSU Fight Song and MSU Shadows directly from the Spartan Marching Band, and also heard inspiring words from President Peter McPherson, PresidentDesignate Lou Anna K. Simon, football coach John L. Smith, hockey coach Rick Comley, women’s basketball coach Joanne McCallie, men’s basketball assistant coach Mark Montgomery, and a number of student-athletes.

Photo by Carole S. Berk

BASEBALL SPARTANS—June 25: MSU adjunct professor and Fourth Genre editor Mike Steinberg, author of Still Pitching (p. 11, Winter 2004), a memoir that focuses on his love for baseball, signs a copy of his book for fellow Spartan Dale Petroskey, ’78, at the Baseball Hall of Fame book store in Cooperstown, NY. Petroskey is president of the national baseball shrine. SPARTANS ORGANIZE ANTITERROR EXERCISE—Many MSU alumni are involved in homeland security initiatives. In July, for example, Col. Mike McDaniel, Asst. Adjutant General

for Homeland Security in Michigan, and an adjunct professor at the MSU College of Law, directed an anti-terror exercise that included 2,000 soldiers from 18 countries. The multinational force performed simultaneous exercises in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, involving mass casualty response, maritime search and rescue, maritime recovery of unexploded ordnance, forest search and rescue, disaster recovery, and humanitarian assistance to displaced persons. McDaniel and two of the planners, both MSU ROTC Distinguished Alumni, nicknamed the exercise “Task Force Spartan” and the MSU flag flew alongside 18 Country flags as well as the NATO flag. McDaniel explained to the participants, which included soldiers, sailors, and civilian emergency workers from Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Germany, Bulgaria, Moldova, Azerbaijan, Romania, and other ten countries, that “Spartan values” as

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exemplified by Leonidas and the Spartan Army at the Battle of Thermopylae, included vigilance, teamwork, and selfless service. Protecting and defending the homeland is McDaniel’s number one mission. Working with Michigan National Guard Joint Force Headquarters (JFHQ), McDaniel, who also serves as the Governors, Homeland Security Advisor, is responsible for ensuring that National Guard troops

are trained, equipped and ready to execute Homeland Defense and Security operations at the request of the Governor or President. SPARTANS IN LATVIA–Col. Michael McDaniel (middle) and Maj. Stephen Potter (left) watch Maj. Scott Hiipakka raise the Spartan flag during anti-terrorism exercises conducted in Aluksne, Latvia, by 2,000 multinational forces from 18 countries. McDaniel directed the exercises.

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SPAR10-PL8S—In August this group gathered at the Ralph Young Women’s Field Hockey complex to show off their personalized license plates honoring MSU. In the background is the steel frame of the new addition to Spartan Stadium. The group currently boasts 240 members. ☛ For more information, visit www.cqql.net/msu.htm.

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dation mission in Antarctica. When he had the opportunity to visit the South Pole on Nov. 15,

2001, he took his MSU cap along for this photo op. By the way, the photo was taken at 12 midnight. SPARTAN CODEBREAKERS KEYED VICTORY IN WWII Given the popularity of The Da Vinci Code, America is fascinated with codes and code-

SOUTHERNMOST SPARTAN— You can’t go further south than this MSU cap, which was placed on the ceremonial post marking the South Pole and photographed by TSgt. John R. Rayome of the 109th Airlift Wing (139th Airlift Squadron), Stratton Air National Guard Base, Scotia, New York. A huge MSU fan, Rayome is married to Suzanne Alden, ’83. He travels to Antarctica every year to support the National Science FounPAGE 54

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breakers. It turns out two of the greatest code breakers in American history are both Spartans. Nearly a decade ago, the MSU Alumni Magazine profiled David Mead (Spring 1995), an English professor who taught at MSU from 1948 until his retirement in 1981. Mead was the U.S. cryptanalyst who broke the Japanese military code in April 1943, thus giving the U.S. armed forces a tremendous military advantage. Mead's role, for which he won a Legion of Merit in 1945, was not publicly known until he revealed it in a magazine story on the 50th anniversary of Japan's surrender. Now, the MSU Alumni Magazine has learned that Mead was not the only Spartan codebreaker whose efforts helped win World War II. The chief U.S. cryptanalyst for the U.S. War Dept. from 1941-47 was Col. William Frederick Friedman, who broke the major Japanese diplomatic code in 1940. Incredibly, Friedman is an MSU alumnus, having attended Michigan Agricultural College as a student in Fall 1910. Friedman's breakthroughhelped the U.S. in many ways, among them the planning for the Battle of Midway, where Admiral Nimitz was able to fight off a superior Japanese force. Born in 1891 in Kishinez, Russia, Friedman and his family emigrated to the U.S. in 1893 to escape anti-semitism. He died in 1969 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. How Friedman came to attend MAC is not known, but Mead, who still lives in East Lansing, was pleasantly amused when told of his colleague's affiliation with MSU. "Yes, I knew Friedman," he said. "What an incredible coincidence." MSU ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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M I C H I G A N S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y Advertise in the MSU Alumni Magazine

MSU Alumni Association Board of Directors * Joseph Chiaramonte Chairperson * Bill Beekman Vice Chairperson * Bruce Johnson Secretary * Sue Hansen Treasurer Patrick Alguire * Thomas Benner Beverly Burns Sharon Buursma Stella Cash William Castanier * Carol Conn Sandra Cotter

Leroy Dell Greg Hauser Christopher Iamarino Gloria Kielbaso Kim Kittleman Edward Liebler Robert Myers Ed Schoener William Somerville Clarence Underwood Terry Denbow Vice President University Relations Charles Webb Vice President University Development

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Jeffrey Armstrong, Dean, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Marietta Baba Dean, College of Social Science Ben Lorson President, Student Alumni Foundation * Keith A. Williams, Executive Director MSU Alumni Association *Denotes Executive Committee

The MSU Alumni Magazine is the number one benefit for the more than 46,000 members of the MSU Alumni Association! Get up close and personal with a targeted audience of educated individuals with exceptional buying power and strong lifetime ties to their alma mater. Or reach an even larger audience with a banner ad on the MSUAA web site, which has become the homepage of choice for thousands of MSU alumni and friends worldwide. For more information call (517) 432-1951 or email [email protected]

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Editors Column AMAZING SPURT BY STUDENTS By Robert Bao, Editor A couple of years ago, I noted in this column that the MSU Alumni Association had become the fastest growing association in the Big Ten. Many of our initiatives to increase membership began to pay dividends and our numbers rose by more than 50 percent. Well, a similar spurt is now taking place with the Student Alumni Foundation, our student organization. “We project that our membership in SAF will go from 1,800 to more than 6,000,” says Beverly VandenBerg, the SAF’s adviser. “We are very excited by what is happening.”

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What has happened is a combination of dynamic leadership combined with some great marketing and hard work. One great example of improved marketing is that the SAF now markets memberships not just to students, but also to parents. “To date, parents have bought some 890 SAF memberships and the number continues to rise,” notes VandenBerg. The numbers of the SAF’s student spirit groups are also rising dramatically. Corner Blitz, the football spirit group, has grown from 549 to 1007 members. These students are the ones you’ll see staying on at Spartan Stadium applauding the team even well after the game’s end, win or lose. The Izzone, which has achieved quite a bit of fame around the Big Ten, could increase from 953 to 4,000, which would occupy both

the lower and upper decks at Breslin with a seniority system to determine the better seats. The SAF has also launched many new initiatives. For example, they staged Rock and Rally, a pep rally for the Notre Dame game, at Munn Field. The event included a live concert with five area bands. They also launched some innovative fundraising efforts, such as Sparty’s Pizza Deal, which sold more than 3,500 pizza coupons to parents. SAF is currently raising funds by selling Chrome Automobile Em-

FALL 2004

blems—a cool-looking Sparty head and Block “S.” “Credit goes to the tremendous leadership of the group,” says VandenBerg, who cited as key leaders President Ben Lorson, VP of Operations Ross Ramsey, and VP of Marketing Matt Warpinski. Given that one of the missions of SAF is to provide leadership training for future alumni leaders, the future of the MSUAA looms bright. ☛ For more information, visit www.msusaf.com

MSU ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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Just in time! A holiday gift for your favorite MSU fan!

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The first of three volumes in the most comprehensive examination of Michigan State University’s history ever undertaken!

$39.95 With more than 500 pages, this first volume recounts the early history of Michigan Agricultural College and explores and discusses M.A.C.’s early development, its status as a land-grant institution, student life, athletics, and its impact on the state of Michigan and the world.

Order your special prepublication copy to be delivered in time for Christmas! Contact Michigan State University Press 517/355-9543 Email: [email protected] Identify yourself as an MSU alumnus and receive your 30% discount. Visit us at our new book store at 1405 S. Harrison Rd., Room 118.

Available Fall 2005 Michigan State College John Hannah and the Making of a World University Available Spring 2006 Michigan State University Meeting the Challenge of a Modern World

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Class

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LIFELONG EDUCATION ABROAD

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Odyssey to Oxford

Alumni Lifelong Education

EVENING COLLEGE Announces the 2005 educational programs for alumni and friends of MSU Get on our mailing list and receive our new brochures describing our many Spring 2005 Semester and Fall 2005 Semester Evening College noncredit courses on campus. Open to all adults. For brochures please contact: Alumni Lifelong Education Evening College A division of the Michigan State University Alumni Association 57 Kellogg Center, East Lansing, MI 48824-1022 Phone: 517/355-4562 / E-mail: [email protected] http://www.msualum.com

Ready for a Career Change? Need New Employees?

MSU Alumni Career Services Has Your Solution Proven Results for MSU Alumni and Employers Recruiting Network Resume DataBase Jobs DataBase Resume Critiquing Experienced MSU Alumni Academic Leadership Proven Resources Personal Services Available Contact Alumni Career Services of the MSU Alumni Association

L. Patrick Scheetz, Ph.D. Phone: (517) 355-7698 Fax: (517) 355-5265 Email: [email protected] Web: www.msualum.com/careers CLICK RIGHT THROUGH FOR MSU

August 27-September 10, 2005 22st anniversary Celebrating its 22nd anniversary in 2005, this two-week lifelong education program takes you on a rare adventure to Oxford—“city of dreaming spires” and to the University of Oxford, famous as a great center of learning since the 12th century. Once England’s capital, Oxford is located in the heart of England just 50 miles northwest of London. Open to all adults, participants enroll in one (of four) noncredit personal enrichment course choosing from topics such as British archaeology, art, history, theatre, or literature. A typical day’s schedule includes morning classes taught by Oxford tutors with afternoon course specific field trips or general group excursions. Group excursions may include visits to Stratford-upon-Avon, prehistoric sites, famous castles, gardens, palaces, cathedrals or abbeys, the Cotswolds, London, and other English towns. There will be ample time during the two weeks and at midprogram weekend break to enjoy breathtaking architecture, art, and gardens of many of the university’s 39 colleges, explore the historic town of Oxford, or visit the surrounding countryside. The city of Oxford offers a diversity of museums, bookshops, theaters, restaurants, pubs, shops, and natural settings to explore. Participants stay in Oxford’s Department for Continuing Education Residential Center offering comfortable bedrooms with private bathrooms, dining room, laundry facilities, common room, computer room, bar, lecture and reading rooms. For a detailed brochure, contact: Alumni Lifelong Education* Evening College/Odyssey to Oxford, Michigan State University *A division of the MSU Alumni Association

Phone: (517)355-4562 • E-mail: [email protected] Web: www.msualum.com

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STATE’SSTARS Leif E. Peterson, ’70, U.S. Air Force Material Command Civilian Personnel Chief, WrightPatterson AFB, OH, has been named Deputy Director. In his new role, he will be responsible for personnel matters for all 90,000 military and civilian workers across the country in the command. Peterson has worked in personnel functions for the Air Force since he took his first job at the Pentagon in 1971. He has had assignments in bases in the United States, Germany and England. Deborah Crabbe, ’82, assistant professor of medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, has received a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to support her project “Sex-Based Differences in Post Infarction Remodeling.” Crabbe underwent postgraduate medical training in cardiology and internal medicine and received advanced subspecialty training in nuclear cardiology and adult cardiac ultrasound imaging. She has completed a research postdoctoral fellowship in physiology at Temple. Ameen Najjar, ’84, legal counsel for the City of Indianapolis Police Department (IPD), has been named director of enforcement with the NCAA, Indianapolis, IN. Najjar first joined IPD as a patrol officer in 1984. He joined the legal counsel office in 1987 and served as assistant counsel PAGE 60

for more than five years before assuming his current position in 1993. Since 1994, he has also served as a part-time associate attorney with Miller, Waters, Martin & Hall, Indianapolis, IN. Najjar is a life member of the MSUAA. David Kapolka, ’72, mathematics teacher at Forest Hills Northern High School, Grand Rapids, has been awarded the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship. A math teacher for over 30 years, he has taught at Forest Hills since 1980 and has served as dept. chair since 1989. Among his many honors, Kapolka was an Eisenhower National Clearinghouse Presidential Ambassador in 1997 and a NASA Newmast Educator in 1998. He is active in many mathematics and education organizations and is a life member of the MSUAA. Christine Ervin, MA ’81, director of corporate communications, Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, has been named director of communications and public affairs (western Michigan area), for Comcast, Grand Rapids. In her new position, Ervin will oversee community and media relations initiatives of nearly 400,000 customers and more than 500 Comcast employees. She has held previous public affairs assignments with Bayer Corp. and General Motors Corp. David Stephens, ’83, forensic scientist for the Michigan State Police (MSP) Forensic Science Lab, Bridgeport, has been named lab-

oratory supervisor at the MSP Forensic Science Lab, Marquette. Stephens has provided expert testimony in over 200 felony cases and participated in more than 3,000 criminal investigations. He helped establish forensics labs in Haiti, Lebanon, Bosnia, Kosovo and Uganda, and has served as a consultant and instructor for the U.S. Dept. of Justice and the U.S. Dept. of State. Gary Minish, ’66, professor of animal and poultry sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VT), Blacksburg, VA, has been named dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. During his 35-year tenure at VT, he served as professor, assistant dean and assistant director of resident instruction and also as associate dean and director of development and agriculture technology for the agricultural college. Minish also served as head of the animal and poultry sciences dept. from 1994-2001. Mark A. Davis, ’84, attorney with Howard & Howard, Bloomfield Hills, has been elected president and CEO. Davis has been with the firm for 14 years, concentrating his practice in the areas of real estate, business, securities and tax law. From 1987-91 Davis was associated with E.F. Hutton and subsequently with the Michigan Corporation and FALL 2004

Securities Bureau. He is a member of the State Bar of Michigan. Natasha Williams, MA ’95, of Peekskill, NY, is the grand prize winner of Kraft’s 1st Annual “New Voices of Gospel” Talent Search held in New Orleans, LA. Over 700 entries were received for the first round of this nationwide competition. Williams received $25,000 in prize money, an audition with Sony Music and a live performance during the Essence Music Festival with some of the world’s most popular R&B performers. James Anhut, MBA ’85, vice president, Brand Management, Staybridge Suites, has been named senior vice president, Brand Development for the Americas of InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG), Atlanta, GA. Anhut has more than 25 years of industry experience, and more than 14 years in senior management positions. He currently serves on the Visibility Committee of the Board of Directors of the Atlanta College of Art, and was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of the School of Hospitality Management at MSU. Anhut is a member of the Presidents Club. Rick Gosselin, ’72, sports columnist for the Dallas Morning News, has won the 2004 Dick McCann Memorial Award for long and distinguished career reporting professional football. Gosselin was honored earlier this year at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, OH. Gosselin worked for United Press InternaMSUALUMNIMAGAZINE

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tional and The Kansas City Star before coming joining the Dallas Morning News in 1990. While a student at MSU, Gosselin worked for The State News. Linda C. Stone, ’65, professor in the Dept. of Family Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, has been named 2004 Professor of the Year by the OSU College of Medicine and Public Health. Stone currently serves on the Admissions Committee, the Board of Governors of the Medical Alumni Society and is chair of the Professionalism Council. She received the Humanism in Medicine Award in 2003 from the Arnold P. Gold Foundation. Steven A. Leibel, ’70, MD ’70, chair of the Dept. of Radiation Oncology at Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, has been named medical director of the Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, CA. Leibel joined the staff at Sloan Kettering in 1988. Prior to that he served on the faculties at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and UCSF. Leibel is past president and chair of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and recently became president of the American Board of Radiology. In July, he was elected to the Johns Hopkins University Society of Scholars. Rodger Kershner, JD ’76, attorney with Howard & Howard,

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Bloomfield Hills, has been named chairman of the Michigan Technological University Board of Control. He was appointed to serve as vice-chair by Gov. John Engler in 2001. Kershner is a member of the American Bar Association and is a member-atlarge of the Boy Scout’s Detroit Area Council. Daniel Seikaly, ’67, Criminal Chief for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Washington, D.C., will join the law firm of Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton, Washington, D.C. In his current position, Seikaly has supervised many high profile terrorism cases, including the bombing of Pan Am flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and the hijacking of TWA flight 837. Formerly, he was Assistant Inspector General for Investigations at the CIA and worked in the Justice Dept. Office for National Security. Karen P. Goebel, Ph.D. ’76, professor of Human Ecology and Extension specialist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, has received a Distinguished Service Award from the American Assoc. of Family and Consumer Sciences. Goebel chairs the Wisconsin Assoc. of Family and Consumer Sciences Foundation and is advisor of the honorary society Phi Upsilon Omicron at UW-Madison. She is former president of the Wisconsin Home Economics Assoc. and has served as national presi-

CLICK RIGHT THROUGH FOR MSU

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dent of the American Council on Consumer Interests. Goebel serves on the board of the Dane County League of Women Voters. John G. Russell, ’80, president of the electric division, Consumers Energy, Jackson, has been named president of Electric and Gas. Russell joined the company in1981 and held positions in material services, economic development, customer service and operations. He also served as vice president and senior vice president of transmission and distribution. Russell is a member of the board of directors for Right Place, Inc., the Michigan Virtual University and the Consumers Energy Foundation. Vickie L. Markavitch, ’66, Ph.D. ’91, superintendent of the PennHarris Madison School Corp., Mishawaka, IN, has been named the first female superintendent of the Oakland Intermediate School District. Previously, she was superintendent in three school districts in Indiana and Illinois, assistant superintendent and executive director in the Niles Community Schools and principal of Bridgman Elementary School. She has taught special education and served as a learning disabilities consultant. She currently serves as president of the Superintendency Institute of America. Thomas J. Manganello, ’77, partner at Warner Norcross & Judd LLP, Detroit, has been named chair of the firm’s Automotive Industry Group. The group provides counsel on a number of

highly specialized areas in the auto industry. Manganello has more than two decades of automotive experience and is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers, the Product Liability Council and the Wayne County Mediation Tribunal. His is also a member of the State Bar of Michigan and the American Bar Association.

ARE YOU MOVING? BE SURE TO TAKE YOUR ALUMNI MAGAZINE ALONG! E-mail us at [email protected]

Send State’s Stars entries to: MSU Alumni Magazine 108 Union Building East Lansing, MI 48824-1029 Please include a current photo and biography. All entries subject to editorial review.

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OBITUARIES James LaDu, ’40, of Virginia Beach, VA, Sept. 12, age 86.

Walter H. Meyer, ’48, of Cincinnati, OH, June 28.

Frederick Harris, ’52, of Farmington Hills, July 21, age 74.

J.B. Poffenberger, ’40, M ’59, of Lakeland, FL, July 1, age 88.

Lowell W. Rasmussen, ’48, of East Lansing, July 4, age 79.

David C. Pray, ’40, of East Jordan, July 12, age 86.

Robert A. Smith, ’48, of Midland, July 21, age 76.

Marvin H. Hoppert, ’52, of Dallas, formerly of Monroe, June 11, age 74.

Robert L. Blue, ’41, of Saginaw, June 18, age 84.

Richard F. Burns, ’49, of East Lansing, June 17.

Robert H. Denham, W’41, of Adrian, June 5, age 84.

John A. Manby, ’49, of Battle Creek, June 10, age 80.

Dorothy (McCulloch) Meitz, ’33, of Lansing, July 9, age 95.

Fern (Christopherson) Mason, ’41, of Scottsdale, AZ, formerly of Montague, June 25, age 86.

Joseph R. Menustik, ’49, of Columbia, MD, Jan. 2004.

Jon L. Young, ’35, of East Lansing, Sept. 13, age 92.

Charles M. Butler, ’42, of Bellvue, Aug. 10, age 88.

Rex C. Burgdorfer, ’37, of Sun City Center, FL and Macatawa, Dec. 27, 2003, age 88.

Malcolm “Mac” E. Plumton, ’42, of Barryton, July 10, age 84.

10’s Blanche (MacNaughten) Coryell, ’18, of Grand Rapids, MSU’s oldest known living alumna, July 22, age 107. 30’s Franklin Howell, ’30, of Jackson, July 7, age 97. Milton L. Berg, ’33, of East Lansing, July 10, age 95.

Ursula W.(Walters) Darnton, ’37, of Lansing and Charlevoix, May 19, age 89. John C. Coffee, ’38, of Grand Rapids, June 2, age 87. John D. Lorimer, ’38, of Birmingham, May 22, age 88. Norma G.(Hoag) Warren, ’38, of Duck Lake, formerly of Lansing, June 17, age 86. Clarence C. Feightner, ’39, of Oklahoma City, OK, July 18, age 88. John M. Hunnell, Sr., ’39, of Lansing, Aug. 26, age 89. Gleason A. MacInness, ’39, of Charlotte, July 18, age 87. Georgiana (Braun) Snyder, ’39, of Tryon, NC, July 13, age 85.

Percy J. Smeltzer, ’42, of Frankfort, May 28, age 85. Elizabeth (Herb) Church, ’43, of Grand Rapids, May 31, age 82. Harold P. McGinnes, ’43, of Bloomington, IL, June 29, age 84. Roger M. Seaver, W’43, of Montague, May 1. Shirley L.(Thornton) Chirko, ’44, of Grand Ledge, June 29, age 83. Mary F. Greenfield, ’44, EDS ’71, of East Lansing, Sept. 3. C. Ray Thompson, ’44, of Grand Blanc, July 19, age 82. Marvel “Mac” (McGirr) Adamy, ’45, of Grand Rapids, June 2, age 79.

Donald “Pete” E. Sark, ’49, of Grand Blanc, June 27, age 80. 50’s Robert S. Boatman, ’50, of Sun Lakes, AZ, Nov. 4, 2003. Charles J. Coe, ’50, of St. George, UT, May 25. Richard “Dick” R. Montgomery, ’50, of Battle Creek, June 22, age 76. Paul J. Ott, ’50, of Alden, July 21, age 77. William H. Vanderbeck, ’50, of Niles, June 17, age 80. William F. Camp, ’51, of Fulton, NY, Aug. 8, age 75. Kenneth L. Cobe, ’51, of Huntley, Il, formerly of Chicago and Ft. Myers, FL, Aug. 30, 2003, age 75. George L. Cook, ’51, of Rochester, July 20, age 74. Thomas A. Creager, Sr., ’51, M ’56 of Owosso, July 30, age 75.

Katherine J.(Peterson) Lewis, ’45, of Traverse City, June 12, age 81.

Joseph V. DiBello, ’51, M ’55, of Perry, formerly of East Lansing, Aug. 21, age 75.

Jane E. Andros, ’40, of Lansing, July 12, age 86.

Doris J.(Hampton) Abbott, ’47, of Owl Head, ME, Apr. 15, age 89.

Clyde J. Greenman, ’51, of Kalamazoo, June 5, age 80.

Ruth (Welch) Brown, ’40, of Whitehall, July 8, age 85.

Fred Martin, Jr., ’47, J.D. ’50, of Saginaw, June 2, age 81.

Maurice J. Hartsuff, ’51, of Clarklake, June 23, age 76.

Robert J. Buzenberg, ’40, of Chapel Hill, NC, Sept. 6.

Warren Card, ’48, of Linden, June 21.

Joel B. Dean, ’52, of New York, NY, May 24, age 73.

Raymond Kangas, ’40, of Wilmington, DE, Apr. 11, age 90.

Elaine (Brandt) Johnson, ’48, of Jacksonville, FL, formerly of Lansing, June 22, age 78.

Russell A. Hansen, ’52, of Lakeland, FL, formerly of Detroit, June 28, age 77.

40’s

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O. Keith Petersen, ’52, of Tampa, FL, formerly of Jackson, May 25, age 75. Clarence Johnson, ’53, of Higgins Lake, formerly of Clio, Sept. 1, age 76. H. Morley Fraser, M ’54, of Albion, June 28, age 82. F. “Doc” Oral Grounds, ’54, DVM ’56, of Gowan, Aug. 16, age 79. Philip “Phil” H. Paine, ’54, of Verona, WI, formerly of East Lansing, July 20, age 72. William “Bill” E. Carroll, M ’55, of Wakefield, June 11, age 80. Donald J. Holland, ’55, of Shelby Twp., May 27, age 72. Wilbur D. Howard, ’55, of Lansing, June 17, age 71. William H. Bovin, ’56, M ’57, of Metamora, Dec. 25, 2002, age 72. Ronald F. Heck, Sr., ’56, of Lansing, July 7, age 69. Charles I. Switzer, M ’56, Ph.D. ’66, of Morton, IL, July 18, age 74. Marylynn “Suzie” (Lambert) Weaver, ’56, of East Tawas, June 30, age 69. Howard D. Wilson, ’56, of Traverse City, June 12, age 75. Mason I. Himelhoch, ’57, of Southfield, May 24, age 71. Lawrence C. Lindstrom, ’57, of Portland, July 25, age 72. Frank T. Paganini, ’57, of Grand Rapids, Sept. 6, age 70. Willis A. Reid, ’57, of Livonia, July 17, age 79. Theodore L. Vernier, ’57, of Grosse Pte. Woods, July 26, age 75. MSU ALUMNI MAGAZINE

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John C. Calhoun, ’58, of Flint, July 11, age 75.

Janet D. Greene, M ’64, of Americus, GA, June 14, age 61.

Jacques Levy, MA, ’58, Ph.D. ’61, of Manhattan, NY, director of the original Broadway production of Oh! Calcutta for a total of 7,273 performances, and head of Colgate University’s theater department, Sept. 30, of cancer. He was 69.

Anna Howery, ’64, of Leslie, June 25, age 80.

Helen A. (Caskey) Olk, M ’58, of East Lansing, July 13, age 93.

Richard Pangrazzi, ’66, of Troy, May 23, age 59.

Carl H. Steffen, ’58, of East Lansing, July 8, age 71.

John R. Shaw, III, ’66, of Santa Rosa, CA, May 12.

Sally (Foster) Lockhart, ’59, of East Lansing, Sept. 7, age 67.

Wilbur L. Dungy, Ph.D. ’67, of Jackson, June 8, age 78.

Barbara M.(Blancett) Sawdey, ’59, of Tallman Lake, July 25, age 67.

Richard K. Nelson, M ’67, of Grayling, May 18, age 76.

60’s

Richard D. Parmater, M ’67, of Bridgeview, IL, July 14, age 60.

Randolph R. Hippler, ’60, of Warren, June 12, age 65. Robert E. Kimmerly, ’60, of St. Joseph, July 11, age 67. Earl D. McCracken, ’61, of Dunwoody, GA, July 29, age 67. Beulah (Hannah) McGovney, ’61, of DeWitt, June 14, age 93. Costa N. Miller, ’61, of Indianapolis, IN, June 19, age 64. Roy S. Pung, ’61, of Jackson, Aug. 2, age 66. Vilma (Graf) Wetzel, M ’61, of Tucson, AZ, Sept. 11, age 84. Dorothy (Schweinsberg) WilksBaughman, ’61, of Dataw Island, SC, June 28, age 66.

Eugene N. Morgan, ’64, of Farmington Hills, May 22, age 67. Roger S. Leavenworth, ’65, of Grand Rapids, May 31, age 63. Wayne A. Tongue, ’65, of San Antonio, TX, July 8, age 66.

Julie A. Reader, ’67, of East Lansing, Sept. 10, age 59.

Edith M.(Turkish) Hall, ’72, of Sandusky, OH, Nov. 22, 2003, age 54.

Lacey C. Kerner, ’94, of Sayville, NY, formerly of Linden, June 25, age 31.

Lawrence C. Nash, ’72, of Gladwin, June 16, age 54.

Daniel E. Radke, ’96, of St. Charles, MO, May 10, age 29.

Diane (Thelen) Urbanik, ’72, of East Lansing, Aug. 30, age 56.

Nicholas J. Bell, ’99, of Central Mine, July 23, age 46.

James T. Vedders, ’72, of Whitehall, July 5, age 55.

00’s

Harry H. Raby, ’73, of Lake City, June 25, age 52.

Brian K. Corbitt, ’00, of Adrian, June 7, age 28.

Howard Gustafson, ’74, of Chesaning, July 8, age 50.

Scott L. Marshall, ’02, of Midland, July 13, age 25.

Ralph E. Peckens, ’74, of Fowlerville, May 20, age 65.

Faculty

Mary (White) Skusa, ’74, of Okemos, Aug. 23, age 53. Lane E. Holdcroft, M ’76, of Poulsbo, WA, July 27. Mary J. Marshall, ’76, of Okemos, July 14.

Imogen Bowers, professor emeritus of the Counseling Center (1972-89), of East Lansing, Apr. 9, age 84.

Norman W. Stevens, ’67, of St. Clair Shores, Aug. 21.

Michele Cousino-LeMay, ’77, MA ’79, of Ann Arbor, June 8, age 54.

Cleo B.(Hall) Isbister, ’69, of Traverse City, June 7.

Leslie (Statz) Fraske, ‘77, of Livonia, Sept. 23, age 49.

E. Michael Kelly, ’69, of Burr Ridge, IL, Aug. 9, age 57.

Debra A.(Seeger) Hiltner, ’77, of Muskegon, June 15, age 50.

Lee McIntosh, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology (1981-), of Leslie, June 28, age 54.

80’s

Alvin Rogers, professor emeritus of medical technology (196894), of Safety Harbor, FL, May 9, age 75.

Donna (Davis) Lewis, MA ’69, of Jackson, formerly of Battle Creek, June 12, age 73. 70’s John W. Ingersoll, ’70, MS ’72, of Lapeer, formerly of Davison, Aug. 12, age 55.

John F. Giuliano, ’83, ’93, of Haslett, July 4, age 47. Peter Hrisko, ’87, of Cleveland Heights, OH, June 29, age 39. Eve M. Broderick-Nugent, MA ’88, of Miami, FL, July 4.

Hazel Vaughn, ’70, of Leslie, July 4, age 84.

Alison P. Wolcott, ’88, of Oxford, July 27, age 27.

John D. Rogers, ’62, of Texas Twp., formerly of Kalamazoo, May 29, age 65.

Kathryn “Kitty” L. Kane, ’71, of Hanahan, SC, June 20, age 55.

Craig L. Neuner, MD ’89, of Bloomfield Hills, June 2004.

Alan Kochanski, ’71, of Rochester Hills, June 14, age 55.

John C. Valas, ’89, of Howard City, May 31, age 76.

Jerry R. Hutchins, ’63, of Lawrence, May 23, age 63.

Linda (Metzger) Linske, ’71, of Okemos, Sept. 10, age 55.

90’s

John H. Lazell, ’63, of Flint, June 17, age 64.

Kenneth L. McCormick, ’71, of Fairlawn, OH, July 8, age 61.

Genevieve M.(Schornberg) deBeaubien, MD ’94, of Saginaw, June 6, age 39.

Gary Lamm, ’62, of Jackson, Aug. 22, age 64.

Robert Blomstrom, professor emeritus of hotel, restaurant and institute management (1965-83), of Sun City, AZ, July 27, age 84.

Walter W. Fisher, ’64, of Suffern, NY, July 25, age 65. CLICK RIGHT THROUGH FOR MSU

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Frank Mossman, professor emeritus of marketing and supply chain management (1951-81), of Montclair, CA, July 1, age 89.

Munir Sendich, professor emeritus of linguistics and Germanic, Slavic, Asian and African languages (1970-03), of East Lansing, June 2, age 71. Lee Sonneborn, professor emeritus of mathematics (1967-02), of East Lansing, Aug. 14, age 72. David Stewart, professor of counseling, educational psychology and special education (1986-), of Mason, June 5, age 50.

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LASTINGIMPRESSIONS Photo by Dennis Groh

A GREEN ANGEL?—This amazing Weeping Norway Spruce in MSU’s Hidden Lake Gardens, Tipton, naturally grew to resemble an angel, complete with wings and a needle configuration resembling a halo. It was spotted by visitor Dennis Groh, ’68, of Dearborn Heights, who photographed the unique 15-foot tree.

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FALL 2004

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Follow Sparty around the campus of Michigan State University in this fun and beautifully illustrated hardcover children’s book. Read along as Sparty visits State’s most beloved landmarks – Beaumont Tower, Main Library, Beal Botanical Gardens, Breslin Center and the Spartan Statue – before heading to Spartan Stadium for a football game. There are even special appearances by Coach Izzo and Coach Smith! HELLO SPARTY! makes a great holiday gift. Order by December 18th to guarantee delivery by December 25th.

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