Touchette Regional Hospital

2MB Size 7 Downloads 26 Views

Touchette Regional Hospital Community Health Needs Assessment Introducon Community Served by the Hospital Demographics of the Community
Touchette Regional Hospital Community Health Needs Assessment Introduc)on   Community Served by the Hospital   Demographics of the Community    

Health Status of the Community Health Sta7s7cs in the Service Area

Process and Methods Used to Develop the CHNA   Data Background Community Input Priority Health Needs

Mental Health Cancer Diabetes STIs Violence Language Barriers

Community Resources Addi)onal Health Data      

Birth Data Food Dessert Physical Environment

1

Introduction ToucheGe Regional Hospital is located in Centreville, IL and provides services throughout Southwestern  Illinois, centered around the impoverished greater East St. Louis area.  ToucheGe Regional Hospital  opened in 1957 as Centreville Township Hospital to provide care to low income, underserved persons  and others who were not welcomed in surrounding hospitals.  In 1993 it was converted from a township  tax supported hospital to a private, not‐for‐profit en7ty.  ToucheGe Regional Hospital maintains its  community roots and remains the community’s safety net hospital.  The hospital offers Cardiopulmonary  with Stress, Pulmonary Func7on and ECHO Cardio Tes7ng, Laboratory, Radiology including Digital  Mammography, CT, MRI, US guided Biopsy, Physical Therapy, Obstetrical Services, 24 hour Emergency  Department, Intensive Care, Inpa7ent Medical, Medical Alcohol and Opiate Detox, Dialysis; Obstetrical  with Level 2 Nursery; Surgical with General, Orthopedic, Urological, Gynecological, Obstetrical,  Ophthalmologic; Outpa7ent Pediatric Dental, General, Orthopedic, Gastroenterological, Podiatric, and  Otolaryngology; Behavioral Health Inpa7ent and Intensive Outpa7ent programs. Because of the poverty  and hazards in the community it provides free transporta7on services (not ambulance) to and from the  hospital and community health center physician offices within the primary service area.  The hospital  also provides Southern Illinois Home Care Services including nursing, aide and physical/occupa7onal  therapy services; and Archview Medical Specialists, a mul7‐specialty group of physicians.  ToucheGe  Regional Hospital also offers community based programs such as Start Now Breast Cancer Awareness  and Seniors IQ.

2

Community Served by the Hospital The hospital’s Primary Service Area is composed of the communi7es surrounding East Saint Louis, Illinois  and iden7fied in the specific zip codes below. These are the same communi7es served by East Side  Health District. This is a predominantly low income African American community.  Residents in the  Primary Service Area make up 69% of the inpa7ent admissions; while 31% come from the Secondary  Service Area.   A larger propor7on of the Emergency Department visits (83%) come from the Primary  Service Area and the remainder from the Secondary Service Area.   East Saint Louis, Illinois and surrounding communi7es were once communi7es of prosperous steel,  chemical, meat packing and other large manufacturing industries.  As these plants moved south and  abandoned the area in the 1950s & 60s rapid economic changes resulted in communi7es with high  concentra7ons of families with mul7ple genera7ons of poverty and associated inner city problems.   Today, these communi7es are s7ll struggling to overcome the grip of poverty.  They stand in stark  contrast to the prosperity displayed by the St. Louis Gateway Arch immediately on the other side of the  Mississippi River in Missouri.  The en7re community is a designated a Health Professional Shortage Area.    Many challenges confront the community.   The general medical / surgical service area in its en7rety consists of the following zip codes and  communi7es:

Primary Service Area (PSA) 62201 East Saint Louis 62203 East Saint Louis 62204 East Saint Louis 62205 East Saint Louis 62206 East Saint Louis 62207 East Saint Louis Secondary Service Area (SSA) 62040 Granite City 62060 Madison 62208 Fairview Heights 62220 Belleville 62221 Belleville 62223 Belleville 62226 Belleville 62232 Caseyville 62234 Collinsville 62239 Dupo 62269 O’ Fallon

3

Demographic Analysis of the Service Area There are significant demographic differences between the Primary and Secondary Service Areas for  TRH.  However, those from the Secondary Service Area who seek services at TRH tend to more closely  resemble the residents of the Primary Service Area than those of the communi7es included in the  Secondary Service Area as a whole.  The following charts detail the demographic make‐up of the Primary  and Secondary Service Areas. Primary Service Area

Secondary Service Area

58,994

236,129

Race* % African American % Caucasian %  Other

82% 16% 2%

16% 79% 5%

Ethnicity* Hispanic Not Hispanic

3% 95%

5% 95%

Income* Below Poverty 100‐200% of Poverty Over 200% of Poverty

39% 28% 34%

12% 17% 71%

Educa)on* Below High School High School Graduate College Graduate

25% 75% 8%

10% 90% 25%

Age*  Below 18 18‐64 65+

12% 59% 29%

26% 61% 13%

Unemployment** 2013 (June) 2010 2000

14.4% 18.2% 9.0%

9.4% 11.1% 6.1%

Total Popula)on*

*Data taken from Census 2010           **Data taken from Bureau of Labor Sta7s7cs official data.

4

Health Status of the Community One of the most valid compara7ve analysis tools for measuring health status is the University of  Wisconsin Popula7on Health Ins7tute and the Robert Wood Johnson Founda7on report, County Health  Rankings Mobilizing Ac7on toward Community Health 2011. It provides a ranking for the 102 coun7es in  the State of Illinois using measures of health outcomes and health factors (higher ranking = poorer  health). Health outcomes are characterized by mortality and morbidity while the health factors are  characterized by health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, and physical environment.   ToucheWe Regional Hospital’s service area is coterminous with East Side Health District’s service area.  Much of the informa7on in this report is from the recently completed East Side Health District Local  Health Needs Assessment. Although the popula7on of East Side Health District’s service area is 24% of  the total popula7on in St. Clair County, the County Health Rankings for St. Clair County is the most  comprehensive measure of health outcomes and factors available that are applicable to the hospital’s  service area.   St. Clair County is ranked •94th out of 102 coun7es in Illinois for Health Outcomes •100th out of 102 coun7es in Illinois for Health Factors Health related data specific to the various communi7es that comprise the service area is delayed and  fragmented.  The most recent available vital sta7s7cs data on births, par7cularly maternal/child health is   2009, while the most recent death data available from the Illinois Department of Public Health is 2008.   Sexually transmiGed disease data is generally available by county; however, a specific request was made  to the Illinois Department of Public Health for East Side Health District service area data for their plan.   HIV/AIDS was only available for St. Clair County.   Health Measure Health Outcomes

Descrip)on Mortality and Morbidity

St. Clair County, IL Rank 94 out of 102 coun7es in IL

Mortality

Premature Death or the years of poten7al life lost prior to age 75

96 out of 102 coun7es in IL

Morbidity

Self‐reported fair or poor health, Poor physical health days, Poor  mental days, and Low birth weight

93 out of 102 coun7es in IL

Health Factors

100 out of 102 coun7es in IL

Health Behaviors

Health Behaviors, Clinical Care, Social and Economic Factors,  Physical Environment Smoking, Diet and Exercise, Alcohol use, High risk sexual behavior

Clinical Care Social and Economic  Factors Physical Environment

Access to care and Quality of Care Educa7on, Employment, Income, Family and Social Support, and  Community Safety Air Quality and Built Environment

25 out of 102 coun7es in IL 99 out of 102 coun7es in IL

101 out of 102 coun7es in IL

64 out of 102 coun7es in IL

Source: University of Wisconsin Popula7on Health Ins7tute. County Health Rankings 2011.

5

Health Statistics Data in the Service Area This low income service area suffers from a vast number of health dispari7es. The hospital’s Primary  Service Area specific data displays that the burden of health outcomes and factors in St. Clair County are  largely situated in the hospital’s primary service area.      Health Disparity Chart: Disparity

Rate in  United States

Infant Mortality Rates per 1,000  4.5 live births* Low Birth Weights * 5.0% (<2,500 grams) Gonorrhea rates per100,000* 98.1 Chlamydia rates per 100,000 367.5 Cancer Incidence Rates per  459.0 100,000** Deaths from Heart Disease per  254.1 100,000** Death due to Diabetes mellitus  22.4 per 100,000** Serious Psychological Distress  3.3% within the last year***

Rate in  State of  Illinois

Rate in  TRH Service  Area

Es)mated number in  service area affected each  year

7.4

10.8

25

8.4%

10.9%

204

163.5 381.3

349.1 691.9

202 400

484.9

502.9

291

252.9

267.7

155

23.1

40.3

23

3.2%

5.1%

2,925

*Most recent 5‐year averages from the Illinois Project for Local Assessment of Needs (IPLAN) Data System – TRH Service Area  East Side Health District ** Taken from 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) data most recent 10 year averages – TRH Service Area St. Clair County *** Extrapolated by poverty status from 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) data – TRH Service Area defined by Zip Codes  62201‐62207

6

Process and Methods Used to Develop the Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) Data Background

This Community Health Needs Assessment uses both quan7ta7ve data and informa7on collected from  community residents.  The sta7s7cal data used mul7ple data sources from the most recently available  sources. The following sources (specific cita7ons are included with the specific tables) were used.   •Illinois Project for Local Assessment of Needs (IPLAN) developed by the Illinois  Department of Public Health •Centers for Disease Control & Preven7on   •East Side Health District’s Local Health Needs Assessment •Healthy People 2020 •Na7onal Center for Health Sta7s7cs •US Census Bureau •US Department of Health and Human Services •SIHF Community Healthcare Needs Data Survey

7

Community Input

Together, the sta7s7cal data and community input was used to inform decisions and select priority  community health and wellness issues.  A key component in this process was the local health  department’s needs assessment and addi7onal data analysis provided by the local Federally Qualified  Health Center (FQHC). The Federally Qualified Health Center’s (FQHC) planning and development staff  assisted the hospital in conduc7ng the CHNA and development of this document. In regards to the  qualifica7ons and exper7se of this staff in needs assessment, they have conducted needs assessments in  this community over 20 years and have several notable accomplishments in u7lizing needs assessments  to secure grant funding. Needs assessments are significant factors in the scoring of many compe77ve  grants that have been awarded to the FQHC and hospital.   Every five years the local public health department conducts an extensive needs analysis and strategic  plan to guide its public health efforts for the next five years. This IPLAN document became available to  the public in December 2012. The public health department’s needs assessment process relied heavily  upon a series of five community mee7ngs involving 52 community members represen7ng a variety of  business/civic organiza7ons and neighborhoods and a community survey which obtained 870 responses.   The area covered is coterminous with the primary service area of the hospital.  Addi7onally, SIHF conducts periodic surveys of health needs within the communi7es served by TRH and  this assessment u7lized the most recent survey to determine that 48% rely on visi7ng the Emergency  Room for care, and a third either have or know family members with unmet health needs. A group of key informants who represent agencies that provide health and social services in the greater  East St. Louis community was convened by the hospital to review data and priori7ze community issues  for the hospital to address. The assistant administrator of the local public health department gave an  extensive presenta7on of the informa7on and process that the local health department had just  completed.  The local health department’s priority areas to address by 2017 included sexually  transmiGed diseases, HIV/AIDS, obesity, cancer, and environment. The local FQHC iden7fied infant  mortality, chlamydia, gonorrhea, low birth weights, cancer incidence, heart disease mortality, diabetes  mortality, and serious psychological distress within the last years significant community health needs.  

8

Stakeholders

Stakeholders in the community include a variety of healthcare and social service providers as well as the  residents of the community.  For the purposes of this Needs Assessment, stakeholder input was solicited  through in‐person mee7ngs, including a group mee7ng featuring representa7ves of local physician  groups, the local health department and mul7ple social service agencies.  Stakeholders were able to  confirm the results of demographic and health data sta7s7cal analysis and offer ideas of addi7onal  health priori7es in the community and discuss ways in which organiza7ons can work together to address  the health problems of the TRH service area.  The stakeholders consulted for this project include: •East Side Health District •Hoyleton Ministries and Puentes de Esperanza •Windsor Health Center •Southern Illinois Healthcare Founda7on (SIHF) – Community Programs •Catholic Urban Programs •Lessie Bates Davis Neighborhood House •Opal’s House (Domes7c Violence Shelter) •Griffin Center (unable to make the mee7ng but was consulted personally and her input 

was also u7lized.)

9

A focus group mee7ng was held at TRH on July 10, 2013 with the following individuals present:  Agency 

Name 

Posi)on

Role in the agency/community

East Side Health  District

Hardy  Ware

Assistant  administrator

Staff person responsible for the local health department’s recently  completed community needs assessment. The health department  provides WIC services, STD services, and healthy food ini7a7ve,  dental sealant, environmental health and other public health  services.

Opal's House

Essie  Calhoun Puentes de Esperanza  Chris Cox and Hoyleton  Ministries

Proprietor/director Domes7c violence shelter in East St. Louis President and Chief  Puentes is a social service outreach to the Hispanic community.  Opera7ng Officer Hoyleton has contracts with the state to recruit and manage the  area foster care programs; violence preven7on programs;  residen7al care for abused and low IQ wards of the state;  transi7onal and independent living facili7es for clients who age out  of the state sponsored residen7al care. Senior Opera7ons  Responsible for the community programs including healthy start,  Director Ryan White HIV AIDS programs, fatherhood ini7a7ves, family  planning, vic7ms of violence; and community health center special  popula7on programs‐healthcare for the homeless, public housing  primary care, and migrant and seasonal farmworkers program.

Southern Illinois  Healthcare  Founda)on

Paula  Brodie

Southern Illinois  Healthcare  Founda)on Leslie Bates Davis  Neighborhood House

Carla  Gibson

Windsor Health  Center manager

East St. Louis primary medical and behavioral health care clinic

Cheryl  Anthony

Providing A Sure  Start Manager

Catholic Urban  Programs

Gerry  Director Hasenstab

Paren7ng and developmental program for at risk teenage parents.   Agency also provides numerous social services including day care,  homemaker services, aperschool programs, community  development, u7lity assistance, etc. Social service mission helping those who fall between the cracks in  the social service safety net including food pantry, clothing, thrip  shop, soup kitchen, homeless shelter, immediate rent assistance,  etc. Aperschool program in six public housing complexes in East St.  Louis

Griffin Center Sister Julia  Director (Did not make the  Huskamp mee7ng; but input  was obtained by  phone July 11, 2013 )

10

Priority Health Needs The members of the group were provided with informa7on about the modified Hanlon priori7za7on  method and asked to help hospital develop priori7es. Aper extensive discussion and debate by  community representa7ves the following community priori7es were selected:

•Mental Health •Cancer •STIs •Diabetes •Violence •Language Barriers

11

Mental Health Mental health is a state of successful performance of mental func7on, resul7ng in produc7ve ac7vi7es,  fulfilling rela7onships with other people, and the ability to adapt to change and to cope with challenges.  Mental health is essen7al to personal well‐being, family and interpersonal rela7onships, and the ability  to contribute to community or society. Mental disorders are health condi7ons that are characterized by altera7ons in thinking, mood, and/or  behavior that are associated with distress and/or impaired func7oning. Mental disorders contribute to a  host of problems that may include disability, pain, or death.  Mental illness is the term that refers  collec7vely to all diagnosable mental disorders. Why Is Mental Health Important? Mental disorders are among the most common causes of disability. The resul7ng disease burden of  mental illness is among the highest of all diseases. According to the Na7onal Ins7tute of Mental Health  (NIMH), in any given year, an es7mated 13 million American adults (approximately 1 in 17) have a  seriously debilita7ng mental illness. Mental health disorders are the leading cause of disability in the  United States and Canada, accoun7ng for 25 percent of all years of life lost to disability and premature  mortality. Moreover, suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the United States, accoun7ng for the  deaths of approximately 30,000 Americans each year.  Mental health and physical health are closely connected. Mental health plays a major role in people’s  ability to maintain good physical health. Mental illnesses, such as depression and anxiety, affect people’s  ability to par7cipate in health‐promo7ng behaviors. In turn, problems with physical health, such as  chronic diseases, can have a serious impact on mental health and decrease a person’s ability to  par7cipate in treatment and recovery.  Understanding Mental Health and Mental Disorders The exis7ng model for understanding mental health and mental disorders emphasizes the interac7on of  social, environmental, and gene7c factors throughout the lifespan. In behavioral health, researchers  iden7fy: · Risk factors, which predispose individuals to mental illness · Protec7ve factors, which protect them from developing mental disorders Researchers now know that the preven7on of mental, emo7onal, and behavioral (MEB) disorders is  inherently interdisciplinary and draws on a variety of different strategies.  Over the past 20 years, research on the preven7on of mental disorders has progressed. The  understanding of how the brain func7ons under normal condi7ons and in response to stressors,  combined with knowledge of how the brain develops over 7me, has been essen7al to that progress. The  major areas of progress include evidence that:

12

• • • • • • • • • • •

MEB disorders are common and begin early in life. The greatest opportunity for preven7on is among young people. There are mul7year effects of mul7ple preven7ve interven7ons on reducing substance abuse,  conduct disorder, an7social behavior, aggression, and child maltreatment. The incidence of depression among pregnant women and adolescents can be reduced. School‐based violence preven7on can reduce the base rate of aggressive problems in an average  school by 25 to 33 percent. There are poten7al indicated preven7ve interven7ons for schizophrenia. Improving family func7oning and posi7ve paren7ng can have posi7ve outcomes on mental health  and can reduce poverty‐related risk. School‐based preven7ve interven7ons aimed at improving social and emo7onal outcomes can  also improve academic outcomes. Interven7ons targe7ng families dealing with adversi7es, such as parental depression or divorce,  can be effec7ve in reducing risk for depression among children and increasing effec7ve paren7ng. Some preven7ve interven7ons have benefits that exceed costs, with the available evidence  strongest for early childhood interven7ons. Implementa7on is complex, and it is important that interven7ons be relevant to the target  audiences.

The progress iden7fied above has led to a stronger understanding of the importance of protec7ve  factors. A 2009 Ins7tute of Medicine (IOM) report advocates for mul7disciplinary preven7on strategies  at the community level that support the development of children in healthy social environments. In  addi7on to advancements in the preven7on of mental disorders, there con7nues to be steady progress  in trea7ng mental disorders as new drugs and stronger evidence‐based outcomes become available. Emerging Issues in Mental Health and Mental Disorders New mental health issues have emerged among some special popula7ons, such as: • • •

Veterans who have experienced physical and mental trauma People in communi7es with large‐scale psychological trauma caused by natural disasters Older adults, as the understanding and treatment of demen7a and mood disorders con7nues to  improve

As the Federal Government begins to implement the health reform legisla7on, it will give aGen7on to  providing services for individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders, including new  opportuni7es for access to and coverage for treatment and preven7on services. From Healthy People 2020

13

 

 

 

 

How is the Local Service Area Affected?

Extrapolated by poverty status from 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) data –  TRH Service Area defined by Zip Codes 62201‐62207

14

Cancer Con7nued advances in cancer research, detec7on, and treatment have resulted in a decline in both  incidence and death rates for all cancers. Among people who develop cancer, more than half will be alive  in 5 years. Yet, cancer remains a leading cause of death in the United States, second only to heart  disease. The cancer objec7ves for Healthy People 2020 support monitoring trends in cancer incidence,  mortality, and survival to beGer assess the progress made toward decreasing the burden of cancer in the  United States. The objec7ves reflect the importance of promo7ng evidence‐based screening for cervical,  colorectal, and breast cancer by measuring the use of screening tests iden7fied in the U.S. Preven7ve  Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommenda7ons. The objec7ves for 2020 also highlight the importance of  monitoring the incidence of invasive cancer (cervical and colorectal) and late‐stage breast cancer, which  are intermediate markers of cancer screening success. In the coming decade, as the number of cancer survivors approaches 12 million, understanding survivors’  health status and behaviors will become increasingly important. Why Is Cancer Important? Many cancers are preventable by reducing risk factors such as: • Use of tobacco products • Physical inac7vity and poor nutri7on • Obesity • Ultraviolet light exposure Screening is effec7ve in iden7fying some types of cancers, including: • Breast cancer (using mammography) • Cervical cancer (using Pap tests) • Colorectal cancer (using fecal occult blood tes7ng, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy) In an era of pa7ent‐centered care, it is cri7cal to assess whether people understand and remember the  informa7on they receive about cancer screening. Research shows that a recommenda7on from a health  care provider is the most important reason pa7ents cite for having cancer screening tests. For cancers with evidence‐based screening tools, early detec7on must include the con7nuum of care  from screening to appropriate follow‐up of abnormal test results and referral to cancer treatment. 

15

Understanding Cancer Complex and interrelated factors contribute to the risk of developing cancer. These same factors  contribute to the observed dispari7es in cancer incidence and death among racial, ethnic, and  underserved groups. The most obvious factors are associated with a lack of health care coverage and low  socioeconomic status (SES). SES is most open based on a person’s: • Income • Educa7on level • Occupa7on • Social status in the community • Geographic loca7on (where the person lives) Studies have found that SES, more than race or ethnicity, predicts the likelihood of an individual’s or  group’s access to: • Educa7on • Health insurance • Safe and healthy living and working condi7ons, including places free from exposure to  environmental toxins All of these factors are associated with the risk of developing and surviving cancer. SES also appears to play a major role in: • Prevalence of behavioral risk factors for cancer (like tobacco smoking, physical inac7vity, obesity,  and excessive alcohol use) • Rates of cancer screenings, with those with lower SES having fewer cancer screenings Emerging Issues in Cancer In the past decade, overweight and obesity have emerged as new risk factors for developing certain  cancers, including colorectal, breast, uterine corpus (endometrial), and kidney cancers. The impact of the   current weight trends on cancer incidence will not be fully known for several decades. Con7nued focus  on preven7ng weight gain will lead to lower rates of cancer and many chronic diseases. From Healthy People 2020

16

How is the Local Service Area Affected? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Preven7on, chronic diseases such as cancer  and diabetes are the leading causes of death and disability.  The number and rate per 100,000  of deaths for cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes for 2007 and 2008 are displayed in  the tables below.  Data for specific types of cancers were available for 2007.  There were a  total of 154 cancer deaths (236 cancer deaths per 100,000) in 2007.  The rate of bronchus and  lung cancer was the highest among the types of cancers at 83 deaths per 100,000 popula7on  in the East Side Health District service area followed by the rate of colorectal cancer, 34  deaths per 100,000.  The rate of cancer deaths was 246 per 100,000 in 2008.           Malignant Neoplasms – Cancer Deaths ESHD service area, 2007 Residence  Area

Lip, Oral  Colorectal Cavity and  Pharynx 

Alorton Cahokia

Skin

Female  Breast

Cervical

Prostate Leukemia Other  Total Malignant  Neoplasms

1 2

1

13

37

4

16

1

26

81

1

1

7

2

5

Centreville

2

5

1

1

3

East St. Louis 2

14

29

3

1

5

3

1

1

1

Canteen  Township

1

2

Centreville  Township

5

2

11

Fairmont City

1

1

4

Washington  1 Park

 

Bronchus  and Lung

1 1

3

2

3

Total

5

22

54

2

11

2

9

2

47

154

Rate per  100,000



34 

83 

3

17

3

14

3

72

236

       *Total popula7on 65,349

17

 

       Taken from 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) data most recent 10 year averages – TRH Service Area St. Clair County

Malignant Neoplasms – Cancer Deaths ESHD service area, 2008 Residence Area Total Alorton 3 Brooklyn 2 Cahokia

42

Centreville East St. Louis Washington Park Fairmont City Total

13 90 3 8 161

Rate per 100,000

246

18

Sexual Transmitted Infections An es7mated 19 million new cases of sexually transmiGed diseases (STDs) are diagnosed each year in the  United States—almost half of them among young people age 15 to 24. An es7mated 1.1 million  Americans are living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and 1 out of 5 people with HIV do  not know they have it. Untreated STDs can lead to serious long‐term health consequences, especially for  adolescent girls and young women, including reproduc7ve health problems and infer7lity, fetal and  perinatal health problems, cancer, and further sexual transmission of HIV. For many, reproduc7ve and sexual health services are the entry point into the medical care system.  These services improve health and reduce costs by not only covering pregnancy preven7on, HIV and STD  tes7ng and treatment, and prenatal care, but also by screening for in7mate partner violence and  reproduc7ve cancers, providing substance abuse treatment referrals, and counseling on nutri7on and  physical ac7vity. Each year, publicly funded family planning services help prevent 1.94 million  unintended pregnancies, including 400,000 teen pregnancies. For every $1 spent on these services,  nearly $4 in Medicaid expenditures for pregnancy‐related care is saved.  Improving reproduc7ve and sexual health is crucial to elimina7ng health dispari7es, reducing rates of  infec7ous diseases and infer7lity, and increasing educa7onal aGainment, career opportuni7es, and  financial stability. Health Impact of Reproduc7ve and Sexual Health Reproduc7ve and sexual health is a key component to the overall health and quality of life for both men  and women. Reproduc7ve and sexual health services can: • Prevent unintended pregnancies. Nearly half of all pregnancies are unintended. Risks associated  with unintended pregnancy include low birth weight, postpartum depression, delays in receiving  prenatal care, and family stress. • Prevent adolescent pregnancies. More than 400,000 teen girls age 15 to 19 give birth each year in  the United States.  • Detect health condi7ons early. Prenatal care can detect gesta7onal diabetes or preeclampsia  before it causes problems, and taking prenatal vitamins can prevent birth defects of the brain and  spinal cord. • Increase the detec7on and treatment of STDs. Untreated STDs can lead to serious long‐term  health consequences, especially for adolescent girls and young women. • Decrease rates of infer7lity. The Centers for Disease Control and Preven7on (CDC) es7mates that  undiagnosed and untreated STDs cause at least 24,000 women in the United States each year to  become infer7le. • Slow the transmission of HIV through tes7ng and treatment.5 People living with HIV who receive  an7retroviral therapy are 92% less likely to transmit HIV to others. From Healthy People 2020

19

How is the Local Service Area Affected? The 5 year (2007‐2011) average of Gonorrhea Cases in the East Side Health District service  area is 529 cases.  This is a rate of 809.5 cases per 100,000 people in the area. African  Americans were 97.5% (2,265 cases) of the Gonorrhea cases with known race in ESHD over 

The 5 year average of ra7o of Gonorrhea is 1.3:1 between women and men.  The greatest  ra7o was in 2011 – 1.5:1.    Year

Female

Male

Ra)o

2007

404

310

1.3:1

2008

348

291

1.2:1

2009

245

186

1.3:1

2010

227

187

1.2:1

2011

269

179

1.5:1

5 year (2007‐2011)  average

298.6

230.6

1.3:1

20

Age group 15‐19 had an average of 192.6 cases (36.4%) of Chlamydia during the 5 year  period.   Age Group

5 year (2007‐2011)  Average

0‐4

0.6              (.1%)

5‐9

0.8              (.2%)

10‐14

9              (1.7%)

15‐19

192.6         (36.4%)

20‐24

184.8         (34.9%)

25‐29

73              (13.8%)

30‐34

30.8            (5.8%)

35‐39

16.2            (3.1%)

40‐44

9                 (1.7%)

45‐49

6.8               (1.3%)

50+

5.6               (1.0%)

Unknown

0                (0%)

Total

529.2

21

National and State Comparisons

Data from most recent 5‐year averages from the Illinois Project for Local Assessment of Needs (IPLAN) Data System – TRH Service Area=East  Side Health District.

Data from most recent 5‐year averages from the Illinois Project for Local Assessment of Needs (IPLAN) Data System – TRH Service Area=East  Side Health District.

22

Diabetes Mellitus DM occurs when the body cannot produce or respond appropriately to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that  the body needs to absorb and use glucose (sugar) as fuel for the body’s cells. Without a properly  func7oning insulin signaling system, blood glucose levels become elevated and other metabolic  abnormali7es occur, leading to the development of serious, disabling complica7ons. Many forms of diabetes exist. The 3 common types of DM are: • Type 2 diabetes, which results from a combina7on of resistance to the ac7on of insulin and  insufficient insulin produc7on. • Type 1 diabetes, which results when the body loses its ability to produce insulin. • Gesta7onal diabetes, a common complica7on of pregnancy. Gesta7onal diabetes can lead to  perinatal complica7ons in mother and child and substan7ally increases the likelihood of  cesarean sec7on. Gesta7onal diabetes is also a risk factor for subsequent development of  type 2 diabetes aper pregnancy. Effec7ve therapy can prevent or delay diabe7c complica7ons. However, almost 25 percent of Americans  with DM are undiagnosed, and another 57 million Americans have blood glucose levels that greatly  increase their risk of developing DM in the next several years. Few people receive effec7ve preventa7ve  care, which makes DM an immense and complex public health challenge. Why Is Diabetes Important? DM affects an es7mated 23.6 million people in the United States and is the 7th leading cause of death. • • •

Lowers life expectancy by up to 15 years. Increases the risk of heart disease by 2 to 4 7mes. Is the leading cause of kidney failure, lower limb amputa7ons, and adult‐onset blindness. 

In addi7on to these human costs, the es7mated total financial cost of DM in the United States in 2007  was $174 billion, which includes the costs of medical care, disability, and premature death.  The rate of DM con7nues to increase both in the United States and throughout the world. Due to the  steady rise in the number of persons with DM, and possibly earlier onset of type 2 DM, there is growing  concern about: • • •



The possibility of substan7al increases in diabetes‐related complica7ons The possibility that the increase in the number of persons with DM and the complexity of their  care might overwhelm exis7ng health care systems The need to take advantage of recent discoveries on the individual and societal benefits of  improved diabetes management and preven7on by bringing life‐saving discoveries into wider  prac7ce The clear need to complement improved diabetes management strategies with efforts in primary  preven7on among those at risk for developing DM

23

Understanding Diabetes Four “transi7on points” in the natural history of diabetes health care provide opportuni7es to reduce the  health and economic burden of DM: • • • •

Primary preven7on: movement from no diabetes to diabetes Tes7ng and early diagnosis: movement from unrecognized to recognized diabetes Access to care for all persons with diabetes: movement from no diabetes care to access to  appropriate diabetes care Improved quality of care: movement from inadequate to adequate care

Dispari7es in diabetes risk: •





People from minority popula7ons are more frequently affected by type 2 diabetes. Minority  groups cons7tute 25 percent of all adult pa7ents with diabetes in the United States and  represent the majority of children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes. African Americans, Hispanic/La7no Americans, American Indians, and some Asian Americans and  Na7ve Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders are at par7cularly high risk for the development of  type 2 diabetes. Diabetes prevalence rates among American Indians are 2 to 5 7mes those of whites. On average,  African American adults are 1.7 7mes as likely and Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans are  twice as likely to have the disease as non‐Hispanic whites of similar age.

Barriers to progress in diabetes care include: • •

Systems problems (challenges due to the design of health care systems) The troubling increase in the number of people with diabetes, which may result in a decrease in  the aGen7on and resources available per person to treat DM

Emerging Issues in Diabetes Evidence is emerging that diabetes is associated with addi7onal comorbidi7es including: • • • •

Cogni7ve impairment Incon7nence Fracture risk Cancer risk and prognosis

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidi7es will con7nue to increase as the popula7on  ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complica7ons will need to  be assessed in light of the newly iden7fied comorbidi7es.

24

Lifestyle change has been proven effec7ve in preven7ng or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high‐ risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring  at the na7onal level. For example, the Diabetes Preven7on Program demonstrated that lifestyle  interven7on had its greatest impact in older adults and was effec7ve in all racial and ethnic groups. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new diagnos7c criteria, such as introducing the  use of HbA1c for diagnosis of diabetes and high risk for diabetes, and lower thresholds for gesta7onal  diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate  the introduc7on of diabetes preven7on at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement  of HbA1c may not be sensi7ve enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ul7mately result in  reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality‐of‐care indicators are currently under development and may  help determine whether appropriate, 7mely, evidence‐based care is linked to risk factor reduc7on. In  addi7on, the scien7fic evidence that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed has s7mulated new  research into the best markers and approaches for iden7fying high‐risk individuals and the most effec7ve  ways to implement preven7on programs in community sexngs. Finally, it may be possible to achieve addi7onal reduc7on in the risk of diabetes or its complica7ons by  influencing various behavioral risk factors, such as specific dietary choices, which have not been tested in  large randomized controlled trials. From Healthy People 2020  

25

How is the Local Service Area Affected?

Area

Diabetes Diabetes 2007 2008

Alorton

0

2

Brooklyn

NA

0

Cahokia

9

5

Centreville

3

4

East St. Louis

32

23

Washington Park

4

2

Fairmont City

0

3

Canteen Township

0

NA

Centreville Township (Centreville) 1

4

Sauget

NA

0

Total

49

43

Rate per 100,000

75

66

Sources:  Illinois Department of Health, Vital Sta7s7cs 2007 and 2008

26

Violence Homicide, domes7c and school violence, child abuse and neglect, suicide, and uninten7onal drug  overdoses are important public health concerns in the United States. In addi7on to their immediate  health impact, the effects of injuries and violence extend well beyond the injured person or vic7m of  violence, affec7ng family members, friends, coworkers, employers, and communi7es. Witnessing or  being a vic7m of violence is linked to lifelong nega7ve physical, emo7onal, and social consequences. Both uninten7onal injuries and those caused by acts of violence are among the top 15 killers of  Americans of all ages. Injuries are the leading cause of death for Americans age 1 to 44, and a leading  cause of disability for all ages, regardless of sex, race and ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. Each year,  more than 29 million people suffer an injury severe enough that emergency department treatment is  needed. More than 180,000 people each year die from these injuries, with approximately 51,000 of  these deaths resul7ng from a violent event. Many inten7onal and uninten7onal injuries are preventable. From Healthy People 2020

27

Crime and Violence in the Community

The annual uniform crime reports (2006‐2009) from the Illinois State Police were used to describe crime  in the East Side Health District service area.  The data for the reports were obtained from Illinois Uniform  Crime Repor7ng (I‐UCR) Program that highlights more than 900 agencies.  Agencies in the East Side  Health District service area repor7ng crime data include:  Alorton, Cahokia, Caseyville, Centreville, East  St. Louis, Washington Park, Brooklyn, Fairmont City, and Sauget.  Offenses and arrests, both reported  and rates per 100,000 popula7on are displayed in the annual reports.   From 2006 to 2009, the total reported index crime offenses in the ESHD were 25,550.  East St. Louis had  the greatest number of total reported crime index offenses, 16,840 during the 7me period.  The highest  number of total index crimes reported was 4,492 in East St. Louis, 2007.  Sauget had a total index crime  rate of 59,832.6 per 100,000 popula7on in 2008. The 2008 total reported crime index rate per 100,000 in  Sauget was the highest among all the ESHD areas between 2006 and 2009.   Total Index Crime Rates per 100,000 Popula)on (Total Index Crimes Reported) Agency

2006  Rates

2006 Reported

2007 Rates

2007 Reported

2008 Rates

2008 Reported

2009 Rates

2009 Reported

Alorton

9,160.3

240

7,137.3

184

10,788.5

275

9,699.1

245

Cahokia Caseyville Centreville

4,337.8 2,559.9 6,475.9

677 110 378

3,739.5 2,771.9 9,596.4

577 118 554

4,052.8 2,941.9 10,320.5

617 127 586

4,979.1 2,219.6 10,452.5

752 95 589

East St. Louis

15,035.4

4,487

15,254.0

4,492

14,550.3

4,219

12,657.7

3,642

Washington  Park Brooklyn

8,310.1

477

9,480.2

538

8,696.4

487

521.8

29

6,220.8

40

12,755.9

81

19,808.3

124

11,451.6

71

Fairmont City 2,661.4

61

2,606.0

59

1,658.4

37

3,030.3

67

Sauget

126

55,371.9

134

59,832.6

143

47,257.4

112

Total

51,851.9

6,596

6,737

6,615

5,602

Washington Park had 29 index crimes reported in 2009, the lowest number during the 7me period as well as lowest rate of 521.8 per 100,000 popula7on in  the same year.   Source:  Illinois State Police.  Illinois Uniform Crime Repor7ng (I‐UCR) 2006‐2009. 2009/2008 Crime Index Offense & Arrest Database hGp:// www.isp.state.il.us/crime/cii2009.cfm, 2008/2007 Crime Index Offense & Arrest Database hGp://www.isp.state.il.us/crime/cii2008.cfm, 2007/2006 Crime  Index Offense & Arrest Database hGp://www.isp.state.il.us/crime/cii2007.cfm.  

The numbers and rates of total index crime arrests are listed below in the table below by area within the  East Side Health District, from 2006 to 2009.  The total index crime arrests reported in the ESHD service  area were 4,070.  East St. Louis had the greatest number of total index crime arrests, 1,214 among those  agencies in the service area.  The highest number of total index crime arrests reported was 462 in East  St. Louis, 2009.  Moreover, Sauget had the highest total index crime arrests per 100,000 popula7on in  2007, at 26,859.5 arrests per 100,000 popula7on.  Washington Park had the lowest total index crime  arrests reported and rater per 100,000 in 2009, 5 and 90.0 total index crime arrests per 100,000  popula7on, respec7vely. 

28

Total Index Crime Arrests per 100,000 Popula)on (Total Index Crime Arrests Reported) Agency

Alorton

2006  2006  Arrests Rates Arrests Reported 5,648.9 148

2007 Arrests Rates 2,366.2

2007 Arrests Reported 61

2008 Arrests Rates 3,295.4

2008 Arrests Reported 84

2009 Arrests Rates 2,454.5

2009 Arrests Reported 62

Cahokia Caseyville Centreville

1,172.5 768.0 3,255.1

183 33 190

1,399.9 422.8 4,555.7

216 18 263

1,701.3 509.6 4,385.3

259 22 249

1,774.5 607.5 4,241.3

268 26 239

East St. Louis

847.8

253

961.0

283

744.9

216

1,605.7

462

Washington Park 1,411.1

81

1,409.7

80

946.4

53

90.0

5

Brooklyn

2,332.8

15

3,464.6

22

2,076.7

13

2,903.2

18

Fairmont City

479.9

11

750.9

17

672.3

15

904.6

20

Sauget

18,518.5

45

26,859.5

65

17,573.2

42

13,924.1

33

Total 

959

1,025

953

1,133

Rates of inten7onal homicide and robbery per 100,000 people have been used as a proxy for the  incidence of violent crime; for the occurrence of homicide is related to the occurrence of other crimes of  violence and robbery has a dual trauma, physical and psychological.  Robberies are also related to  property and associated with violence (Fajnzylber, P. et al. 2002).  The numbers and arrests of murders in  the ESHD service area between 2006‐2009 are displayed in a graph and table below.  Among all the  areas, East St. Louis had the greatest number of murders, 95 with approximately 20% of all the murders  resul7ng in arrests between 2006‐2009.  Caseyville was the only area to have zero murders while  Alorton, Centreville, and Brooklyn each had 2 numbers during the 7me period. From East Side Health District Local Health Needs Assessement

29

500 375 250 125

W as

hi

et Sa ug

ity tC on

Fa irm

B

ro

Pa ng to

n

.L St Ea st

ok ly n

rk

is ou

lle ev i C

C

en tr

as ey

vi

ah ok C

lo rt A

lle

ia

on

0

2006 2007 2008 2009

 

Murders in ESHD service area, 2006-2009 Numbers of Murders and arrests in ESHD service area, 2006‐2009 Agency

2006

2006 Arrests

2007

2007 Arrests

2008

2008 Arrests

2009

2009 Arrests

Alorton

0

0 (0%)

1

0 (0%)

1

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

Cahokia

1

1(100%)

1

0 (0%)

2

2 (100%)

3

3 (100%)

Caseyville

0

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

Centreville

3

3(100%)

4

1 (25%)

2

2 (100%)

3

2 (67%)

East St. Louis

25

7 (28%)

30

0 (0%)

16

5 (31%)

24

8 (33%)

Washington Park 2

0 (0%)

3

0 (0%)

5

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

Brooklyn

0

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

1

0 (0%)

1

0 (0%)

Fairmont City

0

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

1

0 (0%)

1

1 (100%)

Sauget

1

1(100%)

0

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

0

0 (0%)

Total

32

12(38%)

39

1 (2%)

28

9 (32%)

32

14 (44%)

Source:  Fajnzylber, P. et al. (2002).  Inequality and Violent Crime.  Journal of Law and Economics, vol. XLV. 

As one of two proxy’s for the incidences of violent of crimes, there were a total of 1,801 robberies and a  total of 171 robbery arrests in the ESHD service area between 2006 and 2009.  East St. Louis had the  greatest number of robberies 1,369 while Fairmont City had the least number of robberies 7 during this  7me period.

30

Numbers of Robberies and arrests in ESHD service area, 2006-2009 Total Aggravated Assault/BaWery Offenses (Total aggravated assault/baWery arrests reported) Agency

2006 Offenses

2006 Arrests

2007 Offenses

2007 Arrests

2008 Offenses

2008 Arrests

2009 Offenses

2009 Arrests

Alorton

79

53 (67%)

21

15 (71%)

97

58 (60%)

57

40 (70%)

Cahokia

27

18 (67%)

13

13 (100%)

17

17 (100%)

44

18 (41%)

Caseyville

6

6 (100%)

3

3 (100%)

6

4 (67%)

13

9 (69%)

Centreville

169

98 (58%)

209

114 (54%)

161

64 (40%)

195

72 (37%)

East St. Louis

1,745

138 (8%)

1,762

157 (9%)

1,584

92 (6%)

1,348

176 (13%)

Washington Park 157

50 (32%)

179

46 (26%)

130

36 (28%)

5

2 (40%)

Brooklyn

10

7 (70%)

35

20 (57%)

34

8 (24%)

14

10 (71%)

Fairmont City

1

1 (100%)

1

1 (100%)

1

1 (100%)

2

2 (100%)

Sauget

46

37 (80%)

61

51 (84%)

51

37 (72%)

31

25 (81%)

Total

2,240

408 (18%)

2,284

456(20%)

2,081

317 (15%)

1709

354(21%)

31

Total drug crime arrests reported (Total drug crime arrests per 100,000 popula)on) Agency

2006  Rates

2006 Reported

2007 Rates

2007 Reported

2008 Rates

2008 Reported

2009 Rates

2009 Reported

Alorton

1,717.6

45

3,064.4

79

3,216.9

82

1,346.0

34

Cahokia Caseyville Centreville

333.2 2,583.2 531.1

52 111 31

356.4 1,432.9 675.6

55 61 39

394.1 1,413.0 757.3

60 61 43

331.1 1,799.1 443.7

50 77 25

East St. Louis

2,472.9

738

3,198.9

942

3,462.5

1,004

3,506.8

1,009

Washington Park 365.9

21

405.3

23

589.3

34

0.0

0

Brooklyn

5,754.3

37

8,346.5

53

4,153.4

26

4,032.3

25

Fairmont City

1,265.3

29

618.4

14

672.3

15

361.8

8

Sauget

18,107.0

44

10,743.8

26

8,368.2

20

4,641.4

11

Total

1,108

1,292

1,345

1,239

From East Side Health District Local Health Needs Assessement

32

Language Barriers The popula7on of the United States is growing linguis7cally more diverse each year, with approximately  11 million people repor7ng they speak English “not well” or “not at all” in the 2000 U.S. census.   Language barriers have been found to complicate many aspects of pa7ent care, including receipt of  medical services, pa7ent sa7sfac7on, interpersonal processes of care, comprehension, adherence to  prescribed medica7on regimens, and length of hospital stay. Advocates for pa7ents with limited English  proficiency (LEP) have searched for ways to make interpreters available to pa7ents who need them and  to make LEP pa7ents aware of their rights to an interpreter. To date, most pa7ents and providers do not  have access to professional interpreters, yet a body of research suggests that interpreters may be  underu7lized even when readily available.  From the Journal of General Internal Medicine ‐ © Society of  General Internal Medicine 2007 Hispanics of all races experience more age‐adjusted years of poten7al life lost before age 75 years per  100,000 popula7on than non‐Hispanic whites for the following causes of death: stroke (18% more),  chronic liver disease and cirrhosis (62%), diabetes (41%), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease  (168%), and homicide (128%).  Hispanics have higher age‐adjusted incidence for cancers of the cervix  (152% higher) and stomach (63% higher for males and 150% higher for females).  Mexican Americans  aged 20‐‐74 years report higher rates of overweight (11% higher for males and 26% higher for females)  and obesity (7% higher for males and 32% higher for females) than non‐Hispanic whites (3); Mexican‐ American youths aged 12‐‐19 years also report higher rates of overweight (112% higher for males and  59% higher for females). Despite recent progress, ethnic dispari7es persist among the leading indicators of good health iden7fied  in na7onal health objec7ves.  Hispanics or Hispanic subpopula7ons trail non‐Hispanic whites in various  measures, including 1) persons aged <65 years with health insurance (66% Hispanics versus 87% non‐ Hispanic whites) and persons with a regular source of ongoing health care (77% versus 90%); 2) children  aged 19‐‐35 months who are fully vaccinated (73% versus 78%) and adults aged >65 years vaccinated  against influenza (49% versus 69%) and pneumococcal disease (28% versus 60%) during the preceding 12  months; 3) women receiving prenatal care in the first trimester (77% versus 89%); 4) persons aged >18  years who par7cipated in regular moderate physical ac7vity (23% versus 35%); 5) persons who died from  homicide (8.2 versus 4.0 per 100,000 popula7on); and 6) persons aged 6‐‐19 years who were obese (24%  [Mexican Americans] versus 12%), and adults who were obese (34% [Mexican Americans] versus 29%). In other health categories (e.g., tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke, infant mortality, and  low birth weight), Hispanics lead non‐Hispanic whites. In addi7on, since the 1970s, ethnic dispari7es in  measles‐vaccine coverage during childhood and in endemic measles have been all but eliminated;  however, the vaccina7on‐coverage gap between non‐Hispanic white and Hispanic children has widened  for children aged 19‐‐35 months who were up to date for the 4:3:1:3:3 series of vaccines recommended  to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis; polio; measles; Haemophilus influenzae type b disease;  and hepa77s B. Reported by: Office of Minority Health, Office of the Director, CDC.

33

Community Resources SIHF Southern Illinois Healthcare Founda7on is a community‐based, Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC)  network, with over 30 health centers located in seven coun7es in Southern Illinois. As an FQHC, Southern  Illinois Healthcare Founda7on serves predominately low income or medically underserved popula7ons  throughout southern Illinois. SIHF opened its doors in 1985 as a small healthcare facility on Bond Avenue in Centreville, IL with one  doctor, one nurse, and a clinic director at a 7me when many physicians were leaving southern Illinois.  Today, SIHF employs over 600 people, including over 140 medical providers as well as a controlled  affiliate hospital in Centreville, Illinois. East Side Health District The East Side Health District is devoted to improving public health and the environment of the residents  of Canteen Township, Centreville Township, East St. Louis Township and S7tes Township by providing the  appropriate preven7ve health care throughout our community. The District works closely with both the  East St. Louis and Cahokia School Districts to provide programs that posi7vely impact the health of  children. Furthermore the District collaborates with local community social service and health care  organiza7ons to include: Lessie Bates Davis Neighborhood House, Comprehensive Mental Health,  Southern Illinois Regional Wellness Center, Southern Illinois Healthcare Founda7on and various local  Churches. Annually, the District provides preven7ve health services to thousands of clients throughout  our community. Comprehensive Behavioral Health Center Comprehensive Behavioral Health Center has been in opera7on since 1957, providing quality  individualized essen7al services for people in need of emo7onal, rehabilita7ve and social support, on a  twenty‐four (24) hour basis, in the least restric7ve environment. Comprehensive Behavioral Health Center strives to be the top ranking Community Behavioral Healthcare  Center within its size, popula7on and category within the State of Illinois, offering quality services  designed to meet the needs of children, adolescents and adults. Services may include but are not limited  to therapeu7c counseling, psychosocial tes7ng, individual and group therapy, crisis interven7on,  consulta7on, community interven7on, psychiatric evalua7on, case management services, referrals, and  outreach services. Social Service Agencies That Address Issues Related to the Social Determinants of Health Several social services organiza7ons operate in East St. Louis including Lessie Bates Davis Neighborhood  House, Catholic Urban Programs, The Urban League, Hoyleton Ministries, Puentes de Esperanza, and  Chris7an Ac7vity Center.  These agencies strive to improve life outcomes for local residents through a  host of programming designed to improve the social determinants of health through direct ac7on.

34

Additional Health Issues and Information Maternal Health and Birth Outcomes The well‐being of mothers, infants, and children determines the health of the next genera7on and can  help predict future public health challenges for families, communi7es, and the medical care system.  Moreover, healthy birth outcomes and early iden7fica7on and treatment of health condi7ons among  infants can prevent death or disability and enable children to reach their full poten7al. Despite major advances in medical care, cri7cal threats to maternal, infant, and child health exist in the  United States. Among the Na7on’s most pressing challenges are reducing the rate of preterm births,  which has risen by more than 20% from 1990 to 2006, and reducing the infant death rate, which in 2011  remained higher than the infant death rate in 46 other countries.  Health Impact of Maternal, Infant, and Child Health More than 80% of women in the United States will become pregnant and give birth to one or more  children. 31% of these women suffer pregnancy complica7ons, ranging from depression to the need for a   cesarean delivery. Many of these complica7ons are associated with obesity during pregnancy. Although  rare, the risk of death during pregnancy has declined liGle over the last 20 years. Each year, 12% of infants are born preterm and 8.2% of infants are born with low birth weight. In  addi7on to increasing the infant’s risk of death in its first few days of life, preterm birth and low birth  weight can lead to devasta7ng and lifelong disabili7es for the child. Primary among these are visual and  hearing impairments, developmental delays, and behavioral and emo7onal problems that range from  mild to severe. Preconcep7on (before pregnancy) and interconcep7on (between pregnancies) care provide an  opportunity to iden7fy exis7ng health risks and to prevent future health problems for women and their  children. These problems include heart disease, diabetes, gene7c condi7ons, sexually transmiGed  diseases, and unhealthy weight. From Healthy People 2020

35

How is the Local Service Area Affected? Births in service area Data between 2007‐2009 documented 3,272 births, respec7vely 1,091, 1,133, and 1,048.   The number of births decreased by 43 between 2007 and 2009.  The most recent data  available is 2009.  Below are characteris7cs of the 2009 births in the service area.            In 2009, there were a total of 267 teenage births (<19) or 25.5% of all births in the ESHD  service area.  Women ages 20‐24 had the greatest number of births in 2009, 404 total or  38.5%. Of the 1,048 births in 2009, 85.7% (898) were to unmarried couples.  

Data from most recent 5‐year averages from the Illinois Project for Local Assessment of Needs (IPLAN) Data System – TRH Service  Area=East Side Health District.

36

Heart Disease Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Stroke is the third leading cause of death  in the United States. Together, heart disease and stroke are among the most widespread and costly  health problems facing the Na7on today, accoun7ng for more than $500 billion in health care  expenditures and related expenses in 2010 alone. Fortunately, they are also among the most  preventable. The leading modifiable (controllable) risk factors for heart disease and stroke are: • High blood pressure • High cholesterol • CigareGe smoking • Diabetes • Poor diet and physical inac7vity • Overweight and obesity Over 7me, these risk factors cause changes in the heart and blood vessels that can lead to heart aGacks,  heart failure, and strokes. It is cri7cal to address risk factors early in life to prevent the poten7ally  devasta7ng complica7ons of chronic cardiovascular disease. Controlling risk factors for heart disease and stroke remains a challenge. High blood pressure and  cholesterol are s7ll major contributors to the na7onal epidemic of cardiovascular disease. High blood  pressure affects approximately 1 in 3 adults in the United States, and more than half of Americans with  high blood pressure do not have it under control. High sodium intake is a known risk factor for high  blood pressure and heart disease, yet about 90 percent of American adults exceed their  recommenda7on for sodium intake.  The risk of Americans developing and dying from cardiovascular disease would be substan7ally reduced  if major improvements were made across the U.S. popula7on in diet and physical ac7vity, control of high  blood pressure and cholesterol, smoking cessa7on, and appropriate aspirin use.  Why Are Heart Disease and Stroke Important? Currently more than 1 in 3 adults (81.1 million) live with 1 or more types of cardiovascular disease. In  addi7on to being the first and third leading causes of death, heart disease and stroke result in serious  illness and disability, decreased quality of life, and hundreds of billions of dollars in economic loss every  year.

37

The burden of cardiovascular disease is dispropor7onately distributed across the popula7on. There are  significant dispari7es in the following based on gender, age, race/ethnicity, geographic area, and  socioeconomic status:  • Prevalence of risk factors • Access to treatment • Appropriate and 7mely treatment • Treatment outcomes • Mortality Understanding Heart Disease and Stroke Disease does not occur in isola7on, and cardiovascular disease is no excep7on. Cardiovascular health is  significantly influenced by the physical, social, and poli7cal environment, including: • Maternal and child health • Access to educa7onal opportuni7es • Availability of healthy foods, physical educa7on, and extracurricular ac7vi7es in schools • Opportuni7es for physical ac7vity, including access to safe and walkable communi7es • Access to healthy foods • Quality of working condi7ons and worksite health • Availability of community support and resources • Access to affordable, quality health care Emerging Issues in Heart Disease and Stroke No na7onal system exists to collect data on how open cardiovascular events occur or recur, or how open  they result in death. Similarly, there is inadequate tracking of quality indicators across the con7nuum of  care, from risk factor preven7on through treatment of acute events to post hospitaliza7on and  rehabilita7on. New measures and tools are needed to monitor improvement in cardiovascular health  over the next decade. From Healthy People 2020

38

How is the Local Service Area Affected? Cardiovascular diseases or diseases of the heart were among the greatest causes of  deaths in the East Side Health District service area.  The rate of cardiovascular disease  deaths were 311 and 234 per 100,000 popula7on in 2007 and 2008, respec7vely.   Moreover, the rate of diabetes deaths was 75 and 66 per 100,000, respec7vely in 2007  and 2008. 

Rate per 100,000

75

66

Sources:  Illinois Department of Health, Vital Sta7s7cs 2007 and 2008

Taken from 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) data most recent 10 year averages – TRH Service Area St. Clair County

39

Nutrition Environment The East Side Health District’s Local Needs Assessment iden7fied the the nutri7onal environment as a  factor in local health status. The nutri7on environment is a complex set of environmental variables that  influence ea7ng paGerns.  The Na7onal Preven7on Strategy documents, “over 23 million people,  including 6.5 million children, live in “food deserts” – neighborhoods that lack access to stores where  affordable, healthy food is readily available.”  According the USDA Food Desert Locator, several census  tracts in the East Side Health District Service Area are iden7fied as “food deserts” or “a low‐income  census tract where a substan7al number or share of residents has low access to a supermarket or large  grocery store,” (ERS, 2011).  There are a total of 21 census tracts in the service area of which nearly half  (10) of the census tracts are food deserts (East St Louis ‐5004, 5009, 5013, 5042.01, 5045, Alorton‐ 5025,  Centreville ‐ 5026.03, 5027, 5028, 5029).  East St Louis with a popula7on of 25,222 or 38.6% of the  service area has 5 of its 10 census tracts iden7fied as food deserts.  Moreover, Centreville Township with  a popula7on of 26,805 or 41% in the service area has 7 census tracts and 4 of those tracts are food  deserts.  

                     

              

Source:  Na7onal Preven7on Council, Na7onal Preven7on Strategy, Washington, DC:  U.S. Department of Health and Human  Services, Office of the Surgeon General, 2011 Retrieved March 12, 2012 hGp://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/FoodDesert/fooddesert.html

40

A list of food outlets that serve as grocery stores was obtained from the Environmental Health Sec7on of  the East Side Health District.  These food outlets are rou7nely inspected by the Environmental Health  Sec7on.  The IPLAN Team, ESHD Director, and Administrators reviewed the list and iden7fied outlets that  serve as grocery stores for residents.  Of the 18 stores iden7fied, 6 were excluded from the list, 7 were  classified as grocery stores, 4 as specialty stores, and 1 as a butcher shop.  The specialty stores largely  sell ethnic foods.  The store loca7ons were geocoded using GIS. Food Outlet Aldi Foods         Schnucks Grocery Co Shop & Save Grocery Schnuck Markets, Inc Save A Lot Gateway Market Cahokia More Food For Less Mi Tiera  El Cerrito Meat Market Tienda El Ranchito Grocery Tienda El Maguey East Side Meat Company

Address 1233 Camp Jackson Cahokia, IL 62206 1615 Camp Jackson Cahokia, IL 62206 1028 Camp Jackson Cahokia, IL 62206 2511 State St East St Louis, IL 62205 2600 State St East St Louis, IL 62205 7600 State St. East St Louis, IL 62203 800 Upper Cahokia Cahokia, IL 62206 3121 Collinsville Rd Fairmont City, IL 62201 5370 Collinsville Rd Fairmont City, IL 62201 2565 N 32nd St Fairmont City, Il 62201 8402 Collinsville Rd Collinsville, IL 62234 514 M L King Dr. East St Louis, IL 62201

Type of Store Grocery Store Grocery Store Grocery Store Grocery Store Grocery Store Grocery Store Grocery Store Specialty Store Specialty Store Specialty Store Specialty Store Butcher Shop

               

              

41

Built Environment and Physical Activity The Built Environment is another contribu7ng factor to poor health status iden7fied in East Side Health  District’s Local Needs Assessment. The Metro East Park and Recrea7on District (MEPRD) has the duty to  develop trails and trail facili7es in Madison and St. Clair County, Illinois providing support to local  governments and jurisdic7ons.  The districts mission is to, “have as its primary duty the development,  opera7on, and maintenance of a public system of interconnec7on trails and parks through the coun7es  compromising the district.”  The Metro East Park and Recrea7on District has iden7fied 2,700 park  ameni7es in the coun7es of Madison and St Clair.  Some of these park ameni7es are located in the East  Side Health District service area.  hGp://www.meprd.org/index.html MEPRD is con7nuously compiling a map of every park amenity and structure in Madison and St. Clair  that currently boasts over 2,700 ameni7es.  A far of the ameni7es iden7fied on this interac7ve map  include:  restrooms, pavilions, sport ac7vity fields, and playgrounds.  hGp://www.meprd.org/mapping‐ project.html  Malcolm W. Mar7n Memorial Na7onal Park The Malcolm W. Mar7n Memorial Na7onal Park opened to the public in the spring of 2009.  It is located  on the East St. Louis Riverfront and features the Mississippi River Overlook and the Gateway Geyser.  The  Mississippi River Overlook provides picturesque views of the Mississippi and Skylines in St. Louis.   Moreover, the Gateway Geyser is encapsulated by a small lake and four fountains.  The geyser reaches  heights of 630 feet, releasing 7,500 gallons of water per minute four 7mes a day in the spring and  summer.  hGp://www.meprd.org/mmmp.html The MEPRD has funded projects within the East Side Health District Service Area.  In  2007, park ligh7ng improvements were made in Cahokia, IL at the Cahokia Community Park around the  asphalt walking park.  There was also the installa7on of park benches at this same park.  In 2010,  upgrades were made to Lincoln Park in East St. Louis.  These improvements included various renova7ons  to the pool‐house and the improvement/construc7on of various structures within the park. hGp:// www.meprd.org/projects.html  The parks and recrea7on facili7es in East St. Louis could benefit from  con7nued funding from the MEPRD to improve ameni7es as there are a number of opportuni7es for  recrea7on and physical ac7vity in the East St. Louis area.  These parks and the ameni7es have been  iden7fied below: • Frank Holten Park is a State of Illinois recrea7on area and is approximately 1,080 acres with an  18‐hole golf course (Grand Marais Golf Course), football‐soccer field, cross country track,  basketball, and baseball diamonds, fishing, and launch ramps for boast at Whispering Willow and  Grand Marais Lakes, and picnic facili7es. hGp://www.dnr.state.il.us/lands/landmgt/parks/r4/frank.htm • Jones Park is located in Census Tract 5004 and is approximately 130.5 acres.  It is the largest park  in the East St. Louis.  The park has such ameni7es as 8 tennis courts, 6 baseball fields, 1 fountain,  1 waterpark, 2 playgrounds, 1 lagoon/lake, 3 pairs of restrooms, and a recrea7on center that is  only open in the summer, 2 basketball courts, and a garden.

42

Area







• •

• • •

Major Cardiovascular Diseases 2007

Diseases of  the heart 2008

Alorton

4

3

Brooklyn



2

Cahokia

48

23

Centreville

19

12

East St. Louis

113

85

Washington Park

9

8

Fairmont City

7

7

Canteen Township

2

NA

Centreville 

1

12

Sauget

NA

1

Total

203

153

Rate per 100,000

311

234

Lincoln Park is located is located in Census Tract 5009 and is approximately 14.2 acres.  This park  has 1 basketball court, 4 tennis courts, 3 baseball/sopball fields, a concession center, a swimming  pool for children and adults, 2 playgrounds, and a picnic area. Virginia Park is located in Census Tract 5011 and is approximately 8 acres.  This park has 1 tennis  court, .5 of a basketball area, a picnic table with cover, a flower bed area, 2 playground areas,  several park benches, and a baseball area. Carver Park is located in Census Tract 5042.01 and is approximately 3 acres.  There is playground  equipment, 1 baseball/sopball field, a field house with restrooms, a basketball court, and a picnic  area. Cannady Park is located in Census Tract 5024.01 and is approximately 3 acres.  It has 2  playgrounds and a basketball court. 77th & State Street Park is located in Census Tract 5014 and is approximately 4 acres.  This park  has a picnic area and pavilion, 1 playground, 2 baseball fields, 1 basketball court, and 1 free play  area. Williams Park is located in Census Tract 5012 and is .8 acres.  It has a sopball field, a playground,  and a free play area. McBride Park is located in Census Tract 5011 and is 3.5 acres.  This park has 2 swing sets, a  baseball field, and an open play area. Sunken Garden Park is located in Census Tract 5006 and is 1.9 acres.  It has a slide and 5 swings. 43

• •

 

Joyner Park is another park in East St. Louis which has 1 baseball/sopball field, 1 basketball court,  1 tennis court, 1 picnic pavilion and a swing set. Sportsman Park is located in Washington Park and houses a playground and a baseball/sopball  field. Cita7on:  hGp://www.eslarp.uiuc.edu/ntac/resources/ParkReport01/pdf/appE.pdf

In addi7on to the parks in the East St. Louis, football and track fields provide opportuni7es for physical  ac7vity such as:  Clyde C. Jordan Center football and track, the Cahokia High School football and track  fields, and the Cahokia Area YMCA.  The Jackie Joyner Kersee Center provides opportuni7es to serve  youth and encourage physical ac7vity through its facili7es.  Skate City Roller Ska7ng Rink located in East  St. Louis is a venue that can promote physical ac7vity. 

44

Comments